1

To access a struct byte-wise, I'm using a union.

typedef struct {
    char hi;
    char lo;
} range;

union {
    range by_name;
    char as_bytes[sizeof(range)];
} U1;

char use_U1(void){
    char c = U1.as_bytes[0];
    return U1.by_name.hi;
}

Question 1: Is it possible to skip the typedef? Like this:

union {
    struct {
        char hi;
        char lo;
    } by_name;
    char as_bytes[2]; //want sizeof()
} U2;

A naive char as_bytes[sizeof(by_name)] doesn't compile:
error: 'by_name' undeclared here (not in a function)

Question 2: Same but with anonymous structure, to avoid typing .by_name when using.

union {
    struct {
        char hi;
        char lo;
    };
    char as_bytes[2]; //want sizeof()
} U3;

int use_U3(void){
    char c = U3.as_bytes[0];
    return U3.hi; // anonymous structure
}

Read so far: union, struct

  • Why are you using a union instead of just casting the address to char *? (Tangential to the question itself) – Mad Physicist Feb 14 at 15:51
  • @MadPhysicist, that's just a short fake example. Real struct is much longer. – Xpector Feb 14 at 15:52
  • Wouldn't that make a char * cast all the more attractive? – Mad Physicist Feb 14 at 15:53
  • 1
    in general, it is a poor programming practice to use Anonymous structs and unions. This is (for several reasons including) most debuggers cannot display the individual fields without a 'tag' name. – user3629249 Feb 15 at 22:54
  • 1
    Though notably, using "sloppy typing" char for storing raw binary data is a horrible idea, because of the implementation-defined signedness. Professional code always uses uint8_t. – Lundin Feb 18 at 12:04
3

You cannot take the size of an an anonymous type, so simply make it not anonymous:

union 
{
    struct range// <<< give it a tag here
    { 
        char hi;
        char lo;
    } by_name;

    char as_bytes[sizeof(struct range)]; // <<< Take sizeof here

} U2;

You can also create a nested typedef, though it serves little purpose perhaps:

union 
{
    typedef struct 
    {
        char hi;
        char lo;
    } range ; 

    range by_name;

    char as_bytes[sizeof(range)];
} U2;
  • The little purpose of a nested typedef could be to limit the scope of the range, I think. Useful in my case. – Xpector Feb 16 at 18:41
  • @Xpector The first non-typdef has that same advantage. My point was merely that there was little purpose in creating a typedef alias just to avoid typing 'struct' given the limited scope, and the fact that it appears only once. Possibly if there were other members using the same type. – Clifford Feb 16 at 18:55
3

You can give the struct a tag name and use that.

union {
    struct inner {
        char hi;
        char lo;
    } by_name;
    char as_bytes[sizeof(struct inner)];
} U2;

Note that this does require that the inner struct has a name. If there's no name, the tag must be omitted.

  • You can make it anonymous and satisfy the question’s request to avoid typedef by repeating the structure definition: union { struct { char hi; char lo; }; char as_bytes[sizeof(struct { char hi; char lo; })]; } U2;. I think they might prefer to repeat the typedef, though. 😀 – Eric Postpischil Feb 14 at 17:18
1

More simple version not portable (if you plan to use non gcc or mvsc compilers):

union {
    struct{
        char hi;
        char lo;
    };
    char as_bytes[0];
} U2;

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