1

I want to get a collection of elements with a class. I then wish to loop through each element in the collection in order to add a class.

However, I want it to add a class to the first in the collection, then wait 5 seconds before adding to the 2nd in the collection. And so on...

<script type="text/javascript">
    window.onload = function(){
        var boxs = document.getElementsByClassName("paragraph");

        for(let i = 0; i < boxs.length; i++){
            setTimeout(function () {
                boxs[i].classList.add("type");
            },5000);
        }
    }
</script>
0

You can use your i variable to calculate a suitable delay to setTimeout (first execution after 5s, second after 10s, etc.):

for(let i = 0; i < boxs.length; i++){
  setTimeout(function () {
    boxs[i].classList.add("type");
  }, (i + 1) * 5000);
}

When you call setTimeout, you are just setting a timer for the execution of your callback. That's why you need to compute appropriate delays for each call.

  • Doesn't solve boxs[i] that will always be boxs[boxs.length] and not boxs[0], boxs[1], etc. – Jeremy Thille Feb 14 at 16:03
  • You are right!! Closures! Will edit my answer soon – Alberto Trindade Tavares Feb 14 at 16:04
  • 1
    Ah, except no, because it does work with let, my bad – Jeremy Thille Feb 14 at 16:05
  • 1
    Today I learned. Lexical scope for the win. Good point, though. – Alberto Trindade Tavares Feb 14 at 16:06
0

You need a closure for this, otherwise all the functions will execute when i===boxs.length.

for (let i = 0; i < boxs.length; i++) {
    ( num => setTimeout(function () {
        boxs[num].classList.add("type");
    }, 5000*num))(i)
}

EDIT

I just noticed that you used let, so actually you don't need a closure. Every loop will have its own scope. You can just use 5000*i

0

All the set timeouts run at the same time. The loop runs and sets each thing to run at 5 seconds. You need to add a delay by offsetting each iteration.

for(let i = 0; i < boxs.length; i++){
  setTimeout(function () {
    boxs[i].classList.add("type");
  },5000 * (i + 1));
}

Most people would use a queue

// grab all the elements and put it into an array
const paras = Array.from(document.querySelectorAll("p"))

function runNext() {
  // wait 5 seconds
  window.setTimeout( () => {
    // remove the first item from array and set the class
    paras.shift().classList.add("type")
    // if items are remaining, set up the next timeout
    if (paras.length) runNext()
  }, 5000)
}

runNext()
p { color: #CCC; }
p.type { color: #000; }
<p>One</p>
<p>Two</p>
<p>Three</p>
<p>Four</p>
<p>Five</p>

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