is there a way to plot anti-aliased graphics from the Windows version of R? As you can see from the two versions below the Mac version of R prints graphics anti aliased.... Mac Version

....whereas while the Windows version anti-aliases text, it does not anti-alias the actual graphic, as can be seen from the riser points, and the grid: Windows Version

Here is the code by the way:

library(scatterplot3d) 
attach(mtcars) 
s3d <-scatterplot3d(wt,disp,mpg, pch=16, highlight.3d=TRUE,
  type="h", main="3D Scatterplot")
fit <- lm(mpg ~ wt+disp) 
s3d$plane3d(fit)

I need the highest quality possible, for web page publication. I am running Windows 7 and pulling data from RBloomberg, which only works under Windows.

up vote 18 down vote accepted

This is likely to depend on details of the rendering engine on each platform, which could be hard to modify. My suggestions (untested, for lack of time and access to Windows):

  • install the cairoDevice package and use Cairo_png(). According to the documentation:
 This functions the same as any other R graphics device. You may
 use the conventional plot commands and expect essentially the same
 output, except that everything is anti-aliased (similar to other
 vector-based devices like Quartz). Alpha-blending is supported, as
 is enhanced interactivity via ‘getGraphicsEvent’. The device
 should work the same across all supported platforms (Mac, Windows,
 and Linux).
  • Render the PNG at a much higher resolution (or output data from R as PDF) and use ImageMagick (convert) or some other tool to get the anti-aliased version you need.
  • You can also output as SVG with Cairo which may provide superior output. – James May 17 '11 at 9:58
  • I have (finally) got this working. But is there any way to save files or copy and paste, from the screen image, like one can with the standard device? Thanks. – Thomas Browne Aug 11 '11 at 20:34
  • Once cairoDevice is installed, you can simply call Cairo() for a plot window that is anti-aliased under MS Windows. – Thomas Browne Oct 4 '15 at 8:12

Use a vector device such as pdf. First make sure you have that capability and so not surprisingly the capabilities function is what to check. If you do have pdf then just do this:

pdf(file="out_graph.pdf")
s3d <-scatterplot3d(wt,disp,mpg, pch=16, highlight.3d=TRUE,
  type="h", main="3D Scatterplot")
fit <- lm(mpg ~ wt+disp) 
s3d$plane3d(fit)
dev.off()

An alternative for web output might be the png() graphics device. It gets high marks for compactness and web browser compatibility although it is a raster format.

  • 1
    @DWin : the pic given by OP is png format... – Joris Meys May 16 '11 at 21:45
  • @Joris ... I thought the SO interface might have chosen a format on its own. I don't think it takes my pdf's and keeps them in that format when I upload them. (But I could be in error here.) – 42- May 16 '11 at 22:08
  • The OP said he needs them for web display, so he probably needs a raster format. – Ben Bolker May 16 '11 at 22:34
  • I would be lazy and make a pdf then use ImageMagick to convert that to a high-res png. – Roman Luštrik May 17 '11 at 5:06
  • @DWin : I would have thought so too, but the difference between the upper plot and the lower is apparent, and both are png. – Joris Meys May 17 '11 at 8:10

Installing cairoDevice is no longer necessary for using Cairo with png devices. You can now specify type='cairo' when opening the device. Compare the following:

png('test1.png', 500, 500)
s3d <- scatterplot3d(wt,disp,mpg, pch=16, highlight.3d=TRUE,
                     type="h", main="3D Scatterplot")
fit <- lm(mpg ~ wt+disp) 
s3d$plane3d(fit)
dev.off()

enter image description here

png('test2.png', 500, 500, type='cairo')
s3d <- scatterplot3d(wt,disp,mpg, pch=16, highlight.3d=TRUE,
                     type="h", main="3D Scatterplot")
fit <- lm(mpg ~ wt+disp) 
s3d$plane3d(fit)
dev.off()

enter image description here

I'm running Win 8.1, and 64-bit R 3.2.2.

You don't need to go via files, you can simple install cairoDevice as suggested by Ben Bolker, and then call the Cairo() function which will give you a fully anti-aliased plot window under Windows (slower though).

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