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I have a multi-project setup (ProjectB -> ProjectA), and I'm using flatDir to specify a single lib directory in each project.

ProjectA:

repositories {
    flatDir name: 'localRepository', dirs: 'lib'
}

dependencies {
    compile group: 'com.google.guava', name: 'guava', version: 'r08'
    compile group: 'com.miglayout', name: 'miglayout', version: '3.7.4'
    testCompile group: 'junit', name: 'junit', version: '4.+'
    testCompile group: 'org.easymock', name: 'easymock', version: '2.5.2'
}

ProjectB:

repositories {
    flatDir name: 'localRepository', dirs: 'lib'
}

dependencies {
    compile group: 'yan', name: 'yan', version: '5.0.2'
    runtime group: 'yan', name: 'jfunutil', version: '5.0.2'
    compile project(':ProjectA')
    testCompile group: 'junit', name: 'junit', version: '4.+'
    testCompile group: 'org.easymock', name: 'easymock', version: '2.5.2'

}

When I use gradle dependencies for ProjectB, the correct dependency list is generated, showing transitive dependencies from ProjectA (eg, including guava-r08). However, when I gradle build, the actual classpath used for javac only includes the direct dependencies of ProjectB, and the jar generated by building ProjectA.

Another annoyance is it seems for testCompile, I have to re-declare the dependency on junit for ProjectB otherwise gradle dependencies will not be successful.

Any pointers much appreciated - I am new to Gradle.

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About your project structure...

It seems like a better idea to have a single lib folder instead of having one for each project.

Your directory structure is like this:

project/settings.gradle
project/ProjectA/lib
project/ProjectA/src
project/ProjectB/lib
project/ProjectB/src

Any particular reason why you want to have a lib folder for each subproject? This seems like a better idea:

project/settings.gradle
project/lib
project/ProjectA/src
project/ProjectB/src

You can create a build.gradle in the root of the project (project/build.gradle) that contains the following:

subprojects{
   apply plugin: 'java'
   repositories {
        flatDir name: 'localRepository', dirs: "$rootProject.projectDir/lib"
   }
}

This way you can drop all your dependencies into project/lib.

About your test depencendies...

You may also place your testCompile dependencies into this root build.gradle file. It becomes:

subprojects{
   apply plugin: 'java'
   repositories {
        flatDir name: 'localRepository', dirs: "$rootProject.projectDir/lib"
   }
   dependencies{
        testCompile group: 'junit', name: 'junit', version: '4.+'
        testCompile group: 'org.easymock', name: 'easymock', version: '2.5.2'
   }
}

This way you do not have to specify the testCompile dependency in each subproject's build.gradle file.

However, when I gradle build, the actual classpath used for javac only includes the direct dependencies of ProjectB, and the jar generated by building ProjectA.

In order to compile ProjectB, you only need ProjectA. Only ProjectA is your compile dependency; ProjectA compile dependencies become ProjectB's transitive dependencies.

  • Thanks for the suggestion, however perhaps I simplified things too much. The idea is that ProjectA is a general-purpose library. It contains my common utilities etc, and I have 3 other projects (applications) that depend on ProjectA. ProjectA should be entirely independent of the others, and additionally each other Project (Projects B, C, D) are independent of each other. This is why I'm less keen on the global lib idea, as well as the hierarchical project structure. (I'm not rejecting this outright though - so thanks for your effort!) – zorgbargle May 17 '11 at 18:22
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I agree with the previous answer. After a number of attempts we have the same structure

> shared
 - build.gradle
 - gradle.properties
 - settings.gradle
> project-a 
 - gradle.properties
 - settings.gradle
> project-b 
 - gradle.properties
 - settings.gradle

Shared has all the common code, in our case it handles checkins, module deploy, code quality (cobertura), compile etc Shared also defines the classpath which is inherited by sub-projects which can then add additional dependencies.

For your problem:

Have you defined the following in your Project A?

settings.gradle includeFlat('Project B')

Have you defined the following in Project B?

settings.gradle includeFlat('Project A')

  • This looks slightly different to the previous answer: in the previous answer, it seemed the shared lib folder was defined in a root project, while ProjectA and ProjectB were sub-projects of the root. In your case it looks like shared is a sibling of project-a and project-b. My preference is for such a flat hierarchy. Consider if I have shared-a, and shared-b (two independent core projects that can be used by app-level projects. Would your solution support this structure? Thanks! – zorgbargle May 23 '11 at 20:45
  • Yes that is how we use it, if you want I will post more details but I guess you have probably already figured it out by now. I just took a very simple project and got the structure working and then I added in all the real code. The problem I found with Gradle is that the documentation is not mature enough and you never know which is the best way to do things. I hope it isn't a project that fades away due to poor learning resources.. – Shawn Vader May 25 '11 at 9:48
  • Thanks, still stuck though: I've tried for Project B: includeFlat('Project A'). Because B depends on A, I would not expect to have to use includeFlat('Project B') for A (A should not know anything about B). My build now fails when executing gradle build on B - gradle determines it must build A first (yes), but then tries to resolve A's jar dependencies against B's lib folder (no!), so it finds none of the jars and project A won't compile. This is frustrating, because it looks like your structure is exactly what I'm after - thanks! – zorgbargle May 30 '11 at 21:05
  • Ok so I think the missing piece of the puzzle is that project_a needs to know about project_b, well at least have a reference to it. When I run compile in project_b I run it from project_a like "gradle project_b:compile – Shawn Vader May 31 '11 at 8:29
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The build scripts in your original post are fine. The reason why transitive dependency resolution doesn't work is that a project will only ever use its own repositories for resolving its configurations. Hence, one way to overcome your problem is to have just one lib directory. Another solution is to declare a second repository for B that points to A's lib directory.

Another annoyance is it seems for testCompile, I have to re-declare the dependency on junit for ProjectB otherwise gradle dependencies will not be successful.

Not sure what you are saying here, but it might be a consequence of what I explained above. Maybe the following information also helps: Depending on a project doesn't pull in its testCompile/testRuntime dependencies. It's expected that you have to declare JUnit for each project that needs it. To avoid repetition, you can use configuration injection to declare the commonalities between your projects. Previous answers already gave concrete examples for this (e.g. subprojects { ... }).

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