33

I am trying to define a function using templates and I want the typename to be either int or anEnum (a specific enum I had defined). I have tried the following but I have failed:

template <int | anEnum T> // or <int T, anEnum T> or <int, anEnum T>
bool isFunction(const T &aVariable){}

What I am trying to do is to use templates, instead of defining two overloaded functions. I'd prefer the function to be called as the following, without the programmer having to consider the type

isFunction(aVariable) // and not isFunction<int> (aVariable) nor isFunction<anEnum> (aVariable)

Basically, I want this function to be templated for int and aNum types. I have searched for this, but could not find the answer. What may I be missing? Thank you,

  • If it is exactly a single enum or the type int, why not simply write both functions? Why you need a template in that case? – Klaus Feb 17 at 9:14
  • What about other types? Do you want to return false for other types or want to not instantiating the function for other types. – frogatto Feb 17 at 9:45
  • @frogatto No, the bool return value does not have anything with types. – b.g. Feb 17 at 10:24
  • @Klaus I've asked to learn alternatives. Based on current answers, I've decided to simply define both functions. – b.g. Feb 17 at 10:26
25

In addition to non-C++20 answer, if you are, by any chance, able to use C++20 and its concepts feature, I would suggest you the following implementation:

#include <iostream>
#include <concepts>

enum class MyEnum {
    A,
    B,
    C
};

template <typename T>
concept IntegralOrEnum = std::same_as<MyEnum, T> || std::integral<T>;

template <IntegralOrEnum T>
bool isFunction(T const& aVariable) {
    return true;
}

int main() {
    isFunction(MyEnum::A);
    isFunction(3);
    isFunction("my_string"); // error
    return 0;
}

Demo

UPDATE

According to @RichardSmith's comment, here is a more scalable and reusable approach:

template <typename T, typename ...U>
concept one_of = (std::is_same_v<T, U> || ...);

template <one_of<int, MyEnum> T>
bool isFunction(T const& aVariable) {
    return true;
}
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  • For the specific case of requiring the type to be one of two specific types, something like this might work better: template<typename T, typename ...U> concept one_of = (std::is_same_v<T, U> || ...); template<one_of<int, MyEnum> T> bool isFunction(T const& aVariable) { – Richard Smith Feb 19 at 0:09
  • 1
    @RichardSmith I have updated my answer with that also. I find this more reusable and scalable. Thanks – NutCracker Feb 19 at 6:53
20

There are a couple of ways to accomplish this. All involve using the type_traits header. You can static assert on the types in question in the body of the function, for instance.

Or, if you need to consider this function among other overloads, a SFINAE technique can be employed.

template<typename T>
auto isFunction(const T &aVariable) 
  -> std::enable_if_t<std::is_same<T, int>::value || std::is_same<T,anEnum>::value, bool> {
}

This will remove the function from an overload set before it's called if the types don't match. But if you don't need this behavior, a static assertion does allow for a more programmer friendly error message.

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3

What about this solution? A code with the function will be compiled if the type T is satisfied your requrements. Otherwise, the static assertion failed.

#include <type_traits>
enum anEnum {
    //
};

template <typename T, bool defined = std::is_same<T, int>::value ||
                                     std::is_same<T, anEnum>::value>
bool isFunction(const T& aVariable)
{
    static_assert(defined, "Invalid specialization");

    bool result = false;
    // Put your code here
    return result;
}
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  • 1
    This doesn't work well with overload resolution if there are other signatures present (e.g., a hypothetical isFunction(std::string_view)). The signature will still be a valid match, but instantiation causes error. – L. F. Feb 18 at 2:05
  • You can declare useless signatures as deleted: bool isFunction(std::string_view) = delete; – ixjxk Feb 18 at 10:58
  • I'm talking about additional overloads. In that case, this invalid signature may end up being an exact match (e.g., for string literals), thus blocking the overload. – L. F. Feb 18 at 11:25
0

I've improved https://stackoverflow.com/a/60271100/12894563 answer. 'If constexpr' can help in this situation:

template <typename T>
struct always_false : std::false_type {};

template <typename T>
bool isFunction(const T& aVariable)
{
    if constexpr(std::is_same_v<T, int> || std::is_same_v<T, anEnum>)
    {
        std::cout << "int\n";
        // put your code here
        return true;
    }
    else
    {
        static_assert(always_false<T>::value, "You should declare non-template function or write if constexpr branch for your type");
        return false;
    }
}

bool isFunction(std::string_view)
{
    std::cout << "std::string_view\n";
    return true;
}

int main()
{
    isFunction(std::string_view("1L"));
    isFunction(1);
    //isFunction(1L); // will produce an error message from static_assert
}

isFunction(1L) will fail becuase there is no overloaded function or 'if constexpr' branch.

UPDATE: Fixed missed

template <typename T>
struct always_false : std::false_type {};

https://godbolt.org/z/eh4pVn

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