24

Surprisingly the following code fails the Assert:

int? wtf = 0;
Assert.IsType<Nullable<int>>(wtf);

So just out curiosity, how can you determine if a given instance is a Nullable<> object or not?

53

Well firstly, Nullable<T> is a struct, so there isn't an object as such. You can't call GetType(), as that will box the value (at which point you either get null and thus an exception, or a boxed non-nullable value and therefore not the type you want).

(Boxing is what's messing up your assertion here - I would assume that IsType accepts object.)

You can use type inference though to get the type of the variable as a type parameter:

public bool IsNullable<T>(T value)
{
    return Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(typeof(T)) != null;
}

That's not a huge amount of use when you know the exact type at compile-time as in your example, but it's useful for generics. (There are alternative ways of implementing it, of course.)

What's your real life situation? I assume it's not an assertion like this, given that you know the answer to this one at compile time.

  • 1
    Very tricky! That appears to do it. Now I just have to remember why I wanted to know that... – justin.m.chase May 17 '11 at 6:14
  • Also I never realized that structs don't have a GetType() but I should have figured that out since I understand that they get boxed for such things. – justin.m.chase May 17 '11 at 6:15
  • @justin.m.chase: Structs inherit GetType from object - but because the call is non-virtual, they can't override it, which means the value is always boxed... which then screws things up when the original value is nullable. – Jon Skeet May 17 '11 at 6:17
  • 1
    To see if it is any nullable type you can do this: (type.IsGenericType && type.GetGenericTypeDefinition().Equals( typeof(Nullable<>) )); – Andre May 17 '11 at 6:57
  • @Andre: Yes, but I find using Nullable.GetUnderlyingType simpler :) – Jon Skeet May 17 '11 at 7:21
3
int? i = 0;
var type = TypedReference.GetTargetType(__makeref(i));
var isNullable = type.IsGenericType &&
    type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>);
  • This is brilliant, it gives the declared type (not underlying type as in object i = 0; i.GetType() == typeof(int);). But if it is to get declared type why not make us of type inference simply? Like, public Type GetDeclaredType<T>(this T t) { return typeof(T); }. Much more readable. – nawfal Jul 2 '16 at 7:10
3

I like the @jon-skeet answer but it only works if you know the type you are testing against. In our world we are using reflection to open up objects and test values against regex expressions.

simplifying the extension to work for any type worked better for us.

public static bool IsNullable(this Type type)
{
    return Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type) != null;
}

generics are life's blood but sometimes... :)

0

What namespace is Assert in?

The following returns true as you would expect:

int? wtf = 0;
if (typeof(Nullable<int>).IsInstanceOfType(wtf))
{
    // Do things
}

Although its worth noting that typeof(Nullable<int>).IsInstanceOfType(42) also returns true - this is because this method accepts an object and so gets boxed as a Nullable<int>.

  • Assert in my case was in Xunit but I was just trying to say in general that that statement should succeed. – justin.m.chase May 17 '11 at 6:08
  • Also, I don't think the above works... well technically it returns true but I believe it's a false positive because this also returns true: typeof(Nullable<int>).IsInstanceOfType(0) – justin.m.chase May 17 '11 at 6:09
  • @Kragen: Try it with int wtf = 0; and int? wtf = null; for some surprising results. Boxing makes it impossible for such a method signature to really do what you want. EDIT: After your edit, there's still a problem - 42 does not get boxed as a Nullable<int>. Rather, 0 gets boxed as an int boxed type. There is no way of constructing a boxed value of a nullable type. – Jon Skeet May 17 '11 at 6:09
  • @Jon How come typeof(Nullable<int>) return true for an int boxed type in that case? – Justin May 17 '11 at 6:12
  • @Kragen: It looks like Type.IsInstanceOfType is basically treating nullable types and non-nullable types as equivalent. Try typeof(int).IsInstanceOfType(wtf) with your initial code, for example. I can't immediately find this documented, which is rather worrying... – Jon Skeet May 17 '11 at 6:18
0

Here is what I came up with, as everything else seemed to fail - at least on Portable Class Library / DotNet Core with >= C# 6

Basically you extend generic Type Object and Nullable<T> and use the fact that the static extension method that matches the underlying type is going to be invoked and takes precedence over the generic T extension-method.

public static partial class ObjectExtension
{
    public static bool IsNullable<T>(this T self)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

and one for Nullable<T>

public static partial class NullableExtension
{
    public static bool IsNullable<T>(this Nullable<T> self) where T : struct
    {
        return true;
    }
}

Using Reflection and type.IsGeneric and type.GetGenericParameters() did not work on my current set of .NET Runtimes.

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