4

I've followed the directions from the answers to the SO question How can classes be made parametric in Perl 6?. However, I've hit some soft roadblock; I'm trying to type an internal class's attribute using the type capture and getting the following error:

Died with X::TypeCheck::Assignment
  in submethod BUILDALL at ...
  in method insert at ...
  in block <unit> at ...

In the following example, I've typed the class BinaryNode's $.item attribute (with T) but doing so causes the above error:

class BinarySearchTree {
    my role BTSImpl[::T] {
        my class BinaryNode is rw {
            has T $.item; 
            has BinaryNode $.left;
            has BinaryNode $.right;
        }

        method create-node( T $x ) {
            BinaryNode.new(item => $x)
        }
    }

    method ^parameterize(Mu:U \this, Mu \T) {
        my $type := this.^mixin: BTSImpl[T];
        $type.^set_name: this.^name ~ '[' ~ T.^name ~ ']';
        $type
    }
}

my $bst = BinarySearchTree[Int].new;
$bst.create-node(6);
  • Couple things. When I tried the code in tio, which runs a Rakudo from 2018.12, it runs without an error. So it might make sense to use bisectable at the appropriate channel. Second, have you read minimal reproducible example, and if you did, did you understand it, and if you did, did you try it, and if you did some/all these things, what happened, and if you didn't yet do all these things, can you comment on whether you might? – raiph Feb 17 at 20:50
  • @raiph I left out the type from BinaryNode's $.item which meas the code will run without error. I've edited the code and it should produce the error I described in the question. – uzlxxxx Feb 17 at 21:21
  • Ah, now I understand what you originally meant. TBH when I first see a Q I typically automatically cut/paste the code to ensure I get the same results as claimed. And if I don't, and it's a large wodge of code, I typically stop at that point if it's not clear the poster understands MRE and has good reason for it being a large wodge of code. Anyhoo, in this case JW has answered. Indeed, it's quite plausible that it was a good thing you didn't MRE it else we might not have gotten the great answer he's written, which clears up several things in one go. All's well that ends well. :) – raiph Feb 17 at 23:01
8

First off, there's almost no need to perform the class + ^parameterize + role trick. It appears in some of the internals because it helps deal with some bootstrapping problems (the kind of fun one has when defining a language in terms of itself). However, in normal Raku code, just write a parametric role instead of a class. From the point of view of the consumer, there's usually no difference; one can:

  • Call .new on it to make an instance (which actually creates a class, known as a "pun", behind the scenes and makes the instance of that)
  • In fact, call any method on the type object with the same result; new isn't special
  • Inherit from it (again, it works on the automatically produced class)

With the added bonus that somebody can also compose it instead of inheriting.

Secondly, there's no relationship between a class defined inside of a role and the enclosing role (this is a general principle: nesting of one package inside of another doesn't imply any relationship between them at an object model level). Thus we need to make that separately generic and instantiate it.

These two get us to:

role BinarySearchTree[::T] {
    my role BinaryNode[::T] is rw {
        has T $.item;
        has BinaryNode $.left;
        has BinaryNode $.right;
    }

    method create-node( T $x ) {
        BinaryNode[T].new(item => $x)
    }
}

my $bst = BinarySearchTree[Int].new;
$bst.create-node(6);

Which really should work, but the compiler seems to get the timing wrong on the BinaryNode[T]. We can work around that by just forcing it to delay the paramerterization until runtime; there's many ways we may do that, but writing BinaryNode[$(T)] compact and cheap (optimizes into pretty much no extra cost). Thus giving a working solution:

role BinarySearchTree[::T] {
    my role BinaryNode[::T] is rw {
        has T $.item;
        has BinaryNode $.left;
        has BinaryNode $.right;
    }

    method create-node( T $x ) {
        BinaryNode[$(T)].new(item => $x)
    }
}

my $bst = BinarySearchTree[Int].new;
$bst.create-node(6);
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