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Working on a program that uses RPN (Reverse Polish Notation).

I have a function that reverses all the words of string without using strtok or triggering printf (unlike all the solutions found online and here).

The function actually works partially as it prints all the words of a given string except the last one and I need help figuring out what's going on.

char *extract(char s[]) {
    if (s[0] == '\0') 
        return NULL;
    int i = 0;
    char *p = NULL;
    while (s[i] != '\0') {
        if (s[i] == ' ')
            p = s + i;
        i++;
    }
    if (p != NULL) {
        *p = '\0';
        return p + 1;
    }
}

And then it's called in main like this:

char s[MAX] = "5 60 +";
while(s != NULL){
    printf("%s\n", extract(s));
}

The output is + 60 with the cursor endessly waiting for something but the expected output should be + 60 5

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  • 4
    Why do you want to reverse the strings? Reverse Polish is designed to be parsed left to right, using a stack to store intermediate values.
    – Rup
    Feb 18 '20 at 14:36
  • 1
    And a minimal reproducible example would be helpful to help you. Feb 18 '20 at 14:36
  • 3
    Your extract function doesn't return anything when p is NULL (when no space character is found). I think it should return a pointer to the start of the string s in that case.
    – Ian Abbott
    Feb 18 '20 at 14:41
  • 1
    @androidexpert35 you didn't add a minimal reproducible example. Your example is minimal but not complete. BTW your las edit messed up the formatting. Feb 18 '20 at 14:42
  • 3
    This should be trivial to fix if you compiled with warnings and if you stepped through the code with a debugger. Feb 18 '20 at 14:45
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A standard approach is to reverse each word within a string and then to reverse the whole string.

Here you are.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

static char * reverse( char *s, size_t n )
{
    for ( size_t i = 0; i < n / 2; i++ )
    {
        char c = s[ i ];
        s[ i ] = s[ n - i - 1 ];
        s[ n - i - 1 ] = c;
    }

    return s;
}

char * reverse_by_words( char *s )
{
    const char *delim = " \t";

    char *p = s;

    while ( *p )
    {
        p += strspn( p, delim );

        if ( *p )
        {
            char *q = p;

            p += strcspn( p, delim );

            reverse( q, p - q );
        }
    }

    return reverse( s, p - s );
}

int main(void) 
{
    char s[] = "5 60 +";

    puts( s );

    puts( reverse_by_words( s ) );

    return 0;
}

The program output is

5 60 +
+ 60 5

If you want to keep leading and trailing spaces as they were in the original string then the functions can look the following way

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

static char *reverse( char *s, size_t n )
{
    for ( size_t i = 0; i < n / 2; i++ )
    {
        char c = s[i];
        s[i] = s[n - i -1 ];
        s[n - i - 1] = c;
    }

    return s;
}

char * reverse_by_words( char *s )
{
    const char *delim = " \t";

    char *first = s, *last = s;

    for ( char *p = s;  *p; )
    {
        p += strspn( p, delim );

        if ( last == s ) first = last = p;


        if ( *p )
        {
            char *q = p;

            p += strcspn( p, delim );

            last = p;

            reverse( q, p - q );
        }
    }

    reverse( first, last - first );

    return s;
}

int main(void) 
{
    char s[] = "\t\t\t5 60 +";

    printf( "\"%s\"\n", s );

    printf( "\"%s\"\n", reverse_by_words( s ) );

    return 0;
}

The program output is

"           5 60 +"
"           + 60 5"
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