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  1. How to do "call by reference" in Java? (Assume that we are using that term in the same way that it has been used in peer-reviewed CS literature since the 1960's; see this Wikipedia page for a simple explanation.)

  2. Since Java doesn't support pointers, how is it possible to call a function by reference in Java like we do in C and C++??

7
  • 2
    Judging from the answers so far, I guess the question is ambiguous. Can you provide an example in C or C++ of what you are trying to achieve? May 17, 2011 at 9:48
  • Take the example of swapping of two numbers....as given by Stephen C....Is it possible in Java??? May 17, 2011 at 10:51
  • 1
    see this previous answer of mine: stackoverflow.com/questions/3624525/… May 17, 2011 at 10:59
  • I have attempted to resolve the ambiguity by making the question about BOTH classical pass-by-reference AND passing function pointers (which is actually passing references by value).
    – Stephen C
    Jul 18, 2021 at 6:17
  • @StephenC Passing to a C++ function that has declared parameters of reference type is as "classical pass-by-reference" as it gets (one of very few ways to do it with languages in common use today; the only other example I can think of is ref and out parameters in C#, which can also impose restrictions on the caller). C++ reference "types" are weird in that one uses the normal variable-declaration syntax, and can even e.g. declare a struct member of a reference type, but it doesn't create "objects" in the storage-allocation sense. Sep 25, 2023 at 1:24

13 Answers 13

43

Real pass-by-reference is impossible in Java. Java passes everything by value, including references. But you can simulate it with container Objects.

Use any of these as a method parameter:

  • an array
  • a Collection
  • an AtomicXYZ class

And if you change its contents in a method, the changed contents will be available to the calling context.


Oops, you apparently mean calling a method by reference. This is also not possible in Java, as methods are no first-level citizens in Java. This may change in JDK 8, but for the time being, you will have to use interfaces to work around this limitation.

public interface Foo{
    void doSomeThing();
}

public class SomeFoo implements Foo{
    public void doSomeThing(){
       System.out.println("foo");
    }
}

public class OtherFoo implements Foo{
    public void doSomeThing(){
       System.out.println("bar");
    }
}

Use Foo in your code, so you can easily substitute SomeFoo with OtherFoo.

2
  • 2
    I think you mean pass-by-reference. I think the OP is asking about call-a-method-using-a-reference-to-the-method. ;) May 17, 2011 at 9:46
  • 1
    +1 for a thorough answer that covers all possible meanings of the OP's question! May 17, 2011 at 9:58
14
  1. How to do call by reference in Java?

You cannot do "call by reference" in Java. Period. Nothing even comes close. And passing a reference by value in a function1 call is NOT the same as "call by reference". The correct term for that is "call by value".

(Real "call by reference" allows you to do this kind of thing:

void swap(ref int i, ref int j) { int tmp = *i; *i = *j; *j = tmp }

int a = 1;
int b = 2;
swap(a, b);
print("a is %s, b is %s\n", a, b);  // -> "a = 2, b = 1"

You simply can't do that in Java.)


  1. Since Java doesn't support pointers ...

While this is technically true, it would not be an impediment to what you are trying to do.

Java does support references, which are like pointers in the most important respects. The difference is that you can't treat references as memory addresses by doing arithmetic on them, converting them to and from integer types and so on.

Furthermore, you can't create a reference to a variable in Java. because that concept does not exist in Java or the JVM architecture. This is what makes real "call by reference" impossible in Java.


... how is it possible to call a function by reference in Java like we do in C and C++??

This part of your question is ambiguous. If you are asking (again) if you can do "call by reference" in Java, the answer is (again) "It is not possible"; see above.

If you are actually talking about calls that involve references to functions (or function pointers in C / C++ parlance) ...

Important note: this is NOT "call by reference". It is calling via a reference to a function2. Once you have figured out what function is called, normal Java "call by value" semantics apply. And the same goes for the case where you pass a function reference as an argument to another function call: the reference is passed by value.

Prior to Java 8, references to functions were not supported as values. So you could not pass them as arguments, and you could not assign them to variables. However, you could define a class with one instance method, and use an instance of the class instead of a function reference. Other Answers give examples of this approach.

From Java 8 onwards, method references are supported using :: syntax. There are 4 kinds of method reference:

  • Reference to a static method: ContainingClass::staticMethodName
  • Reference to an instance method of a particular object: containingObject::instanceMethodName
  • Reference to an instance method of an arbitrary object of a particular type: ContainingType::methodName
  • Reference to a constructor: ClassName::new

Method and constructor references (and lambdas) are passed by value, just like everything else in Java.


1 - To simplify, I am using "function" as a shorthand for "method" or "constructor" or "lambda" in the Java context.
2 - From a pedagogical perspective, it is unfortunate that C and C++ use the & symbol for both call-by-reference and for denoting function pointers. However, from a language design perspective, I don't disagree with that design choice.

1
3

Usually in java this is solved by using interfaces:

Collections.sort(list, new Comparator() {

  @Override
  public int compareTo(Object o1, Object o2) {
  /// code
  }

});
1
  • The only reason you can modify list, is through list's methods. If the parameters were ints, interfaces don't help. The OP is referring to being able to modify the actual parameter through the formal parameter.
    – jbruni
    Jan 5, 2017 at 16:34
2
package jgf;

public class TestJavaParams {

 public static void main(String[] args) {
    int[] counter1 = new int[1];
    counter1[0] = 0;
    System.out.println(counter1[0]);
    doAdd1(counter1);
    System.out.println(counter1[0]);
    int counter2 = 0;
    System.out.println(counter2);
    doAdd2(counter2);
    System.out.println(counter2);   
  }

  public static void doAdd1(int[] counter1) {
    counter1[0] += 1;
  }

  public static void doAdd2(int counter2) {
    counter2 += 1;
  }
}

Output would be:

0
1
0
0
1

The best way is to use an interface which performs the action.

// Pass a Runnable which calls the task() method
executor.submit(new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        task();
    }
});

public void task() { }

You can use reflections to call any method

Method method = MyClass.class.getMethod("methodToCall", ParameterType.class);
result = method.invoke(object, args);
1

In Java, except for primitives, passing Object to a method/function is always by reference. See Oli Charlesworth's answer for the example.

For primitive types, you can wrap it using array: For example:

public void foo(int[] in){
  in[0] = 2;
}

int[] byRef = new int[1];
byRef[0] = 1;
foo(byRef);
// ==> byRef[0] == 2.
2
  • Wrapping primitive type in an array does work. See code with package jgf:
    – JGFMK
    Sep 11, 2013 at 16:56
  • 2
    A lot of ppl confuse between "call by reference" and "object references are passed by value". In Java, it is always "call by value".
    – jAckOdE
    Dec 27, 2013 at 16:38
1

Java allows only call by value. However, references to objects can be transferred to the called function using call by value. These references if used to manipulate the data of the object in the called function, this change will be visible in the calling function also. We can not do pointer arithmetic on the references as we do with pointers but references can point to the data of the object using period operator which functions as '*' operator in C/C++.

0

http://www.javaworld.com/javaqa/2000-05/03-qa-0526-pass.html

Java does manipulate objects by reference, and all object variables are references. However, Java doesn't pass method arguments by reference; it passes them by value.

1
  • 2
    While true, it's important to note one very important thing: The value being passed is the object's reference. Sep 10, 2012 at 13:45
0

From Java The Complete Reference by Herbert Shildt 9th edition: "When you pass an object to a method, the situation changes dramatically, because objects are passed by what is effectively call-by-reference. Keep in mind that when you create a variable of a class type, you are only creating a reference to an object. Thus, when you pass this reference to a method, the parameter that receives it will refer to the same object as that referred to by theargument. This effectively means that objects act as if they are passed to methods by use of call-by-referen ce. Changes to the object inside the method do affect the object used as an argument."

package objectpassing;

public class PassObjectTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Obj1 o1 = new Obj1(9);
        System.out.println(o1.getA());
        o1.setA(3);
        System.out.println(o1.getA());
        System.out.println(sendObj1(o1).getA());
        System.out.println(o1.getA());
    }

public static Obj1 sendObj1(Obj1 o)
{
    o.setA(2);
    return o;
}


}

class Obj1
{
    private int a;

    Obj1(int num)
    {
        a=num;
    }

    void setA(int setnum)
    {
        a=setnum;
    }

    int getA()
    {
        return a;
    }
}

OP: 9 3 2 2

FInal call to getA() shows original object field 'a' was changed in the call to method public static Obj1 sendObj1(Obj1 o).

2
  • I now own about 5 books on Java. Put bluntly, most of the authors SUCK at writing books and their mastery of the Java language is questionable at best.
    – Dave Black
    Aug 20, 2014 at 11:35
  • The author who wrote that quoted text does not understand what "call by reference" really means. Call by reference means passing a reference to a variable. Saying that passing a reference to a variable and a reference to an object are "effectively the same thing" is like saying that cars and bicycles are effectively the same thing.
    – Stephen C
    Jul 18, 2021 at 5:54
0

JAVA does allow internal reference using objects. When one write this assignment Obj o1 = new Obj(); Obj o2=o1; What does it do, that both o1 and o2 points to the same address. Manipulating any object's space, will reflect in the other's also.

So to do this, as mentioned above you can either use Array, Collections

1
  • This is barely comprehensible, and doesn't seem to add any information on top of previously existing answer. I think it was intended as an attempt to explain why the "container object" trick works, but it doesn't really have explanatory value. Sep 25, 2023 at 1:31
0

You cannot do call by reference in Java. Period. Nothing even comes close. And passing a reference by value is NOT the same as call by reference.

I used an array to do this...

    package method;


    import java.util.Scanner;

    public class InterChange {



        public static void main(String[] args) {

        Scanner sc=new Scanner(System.in);

        int a[]=new int[2];

        System.out.println("Enter two values");

        for(int i=0;i<2;i++) {

            a[i]=sc.nextInt();
        }




        hange(a);

        for(int i=0;i<2;i++) {

            System.out.println(a[i]);
        }


    }




     static int hange(int b[])
    {
        int temp;

        temp=b[0];
        b[0]=b[1];
        b[1]=temp;
        return b[0]&b[1];

    }

    }
1
  • Déjà Vu ... I have seen the first sentence somewhere else... :-|
    – user85421
    Sep 25, 2023 at 1:23
-1

Yes, you can implement Call by Reference in another way by "Pass by Reference".

  • You should pass the reference object of a class created.
  • Then you can manipulate the object's data by member function (.), which will be reflected in original data.

In below code the original data --> x is manipulated by passing the reference object.

public class Method_Call {
static int x=50;
public void change(Method_Call obj) {
    obj.x = 100;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {

    Method_Call obj = new Method_Call();
    System.out.println(x);
    obj.change(obj);
    System.out.println(x);

}

}

Output: 50 100

1
-1

Others have explained it nicely. My 2 cents on a workaround which I use while solving coding problems where global variable was not allowed to use.

class NodeWrapper { // Create a wrapper class around a Binary tree node
    TreeNode prev;

    public NodeWrapper() {
        prev = null;
    }
}

public boolean isValidBSTHelper(TreeNode root, NodeWrapper wrappedNode) {
 // In this method we can refer wrappedNode.prev and modify it 
 // here wrappedNode will always point to single TreeNode object 
 // unless we do wrappedNode = new NodeWrapper() here
}

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