14

How to sum float numbers in the format hours and minutes?

Those. if calculate two such numbers 0.35+3.45 then it should be = 4.20, not 3.80

var arr = [0.15, 0.2, 3.45, 0.4, 2, 0.3, 5.2, 1, 1.4, 1.1, 2.4, 1, 3.4]
    
var sum = 0.0;
    
arr.forEach(function(item) {
  console.log(sum);
  sum += parseFloat(item);
});

The result should be like this:

0
0.15
0.35
4.20
5.0
7.0
7.30
12.50
13.50
15.30
16.40
19.20
20.20
  • 1
    How will you define the logic ? – Juhil Somaiya Feb 19 at 5:30
  • 6
    So does 0.2 represent 20 minutes, or 0.2 of an hour? does 1.0 mean an hour, or does 0.6 mean an hour? – Spangle Feb 19 at 5:31
  • 2
    Sorry, so 1.0 means 1 hour and 0 minutes?. What does 0.6 and 0.7 mean for example? – Spangle Feb 19 at 5:33
  • 2
    You'll find an answer here: codereview.stackexchange.com/a/109478. Convert your numbers to strings, and in the function use "." to split those strings, not ":". – Gerardo Furtado Feb 19 at 5:34
  • 6
    You complicate yourself with such logic. 0.5 hours should be 30 minutes, anything else is completely irrational. I hope it's not for a client in real life.. Either work with float values of a fixed time unit or you separate hours/minutes. As simple as that. – Kaddath Feb 19 at 15:36
7

The best way to deal with "crazy" data formats like that is to first convert them into a sane and easily processable format, do whatever you need to do using the converted data and finally (if you absolutely have to) convert the results back to the original format.

(Of course, the real solution is to stop using such crazy time representations entirely. But that's not always practical, e.g. because you need to interface with a legacy system that you cannot change.)

In your case, a suitable sane format for your data would be e.g. an integral number of minutes. Once you've converted your data to this format, you can then do ordinary arithmetic on it.

// converts a pseudo-float of the form hh.mm into an integer number of minutes
// robust against floating-point roundoff errors, also works for negative numbers
function hhMmToMinutes(x) {
  const hhmm = Math.round(100 * x)  // convert hh.mm -> hhmm
  return 60 * Math.trunc(hhmm / 100) + (hhmm % 100)
}

// convert minutes back to hh.mm pseudo-float format
// use minutesToHhMm(minutes).toFixed(2) if you want trailing zeros
function minutesToHhMm(minutes) {
  return Math.trunc(minutes / 60) + (minutes % 60) / 100
}

const arr = [0.15, 0.2, 3.45, 0.4, 2, 0.3, 5.2, 1, 1.4, 1.1, 2.4, 1, 3.4]

let sum = 0
console.log( arr.map(hhMmToMinutes).map(x => sum += x).map(minutesToHhMm) )

Note that the conversion code above first multiplies the input float by 100 and rounds it to an integer before separating the hour and minute parts. This should robustly handle inputs with possible rounding errors while avoiding the need to stringify the inputs.

The reason for taking extra care here is because the number 0.01 = 1/100 (and most of its multiples) is not actually exactly representable in the binary floating-point format used by JavaScript. Thus you can't actually have a JS number that would be exactly equal 0.01 — the best you can have is a number that's so close that converting it to a string will automatically hide the error. But the rounding error is still there, and can bite you if you try to do things like comparing such numbers to a exact threshold. Here's a nice and simple demonstration:

console.log(Math.trunc(100 * 0.29))  // you'd think this would be 29...

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7

// We got this after simple addition
// Now we want to change it into 4.2
sample = 3.8

// Now here are the minutes that the float currently shows
minutes = (sample % 1) * 100

// And the hours
hours = Math.floor(sample)

// Here are the number of hours that can be reduced from minutes
AddHours = Math.floor(minutes / 60)

// Adding them to the hours count
hours += AddHours

// Reducing mintues
minutes %= 60

// Finally formatting hour and minutes into your format
final = hours + (minutes / 100.0)
console.log(final)

You can use this logic after doing simple arithmetic addition, this will convert the sum into time format

|improve this answer|||||
  • 2
    Why math.floor(sample/1) instead of just math.floor(sample) ? – selbie Feb 19 at 5:46
  • 2
    @selbie, simply because I firstly added only sample / 1, I though JS will floor it itself because there was no decimal in the divisor (as in sample / 1.0, quite a long time since used JS ;), But it didn't so I quickly googled and added floor, forgot to remove that. Anyways thanks for pointing that – Letsintegreat Feb 19 at 5:49
  • 2
    You should mention that this needs to be done for every element in arr not on the result. For example, if arr = [1.5, 2.5] the result will be 4 instead of 4.4 – Titus Feb 19 at 5:52
  • 1
    @Titus, Yes I missed that part, so we need to fetch hours and minutes from every single element, then add them separately, then only my approach will be useful. – Letsintegreat Feb 19 at 5:57
4

Here you go, implementation in Javascript ES6. I looped each element, and splits hours, minutes by ., checked if minutes is non-existing else assign 0 count the total of hours and minutes and applied necessary computation.

const resultObj = [0.35, 3.45].reduce((a, e) => {
  const [hours, minutes] = e.toString().split('.');
  a.h += +hours;
  a.m += (+(minutes.padEnd(2, 0)) || 0); 
  return a;
}, {h: 0, m: 0});


const result = resultObj.h + Math.floor(resultObj.m / 60) + ((resultObj.m % 60) / 100);
console.log(result);

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  • 1
    Will not work as is, e.g 0.3 will only be counted as three minutes, not 30 minutes with your solution. – Spangle Feb 19 at 7:05
3

You need to convert everything either into hours or into minutes and then do the math.

Example: 0.35 + 3.45
Convert 0.35 to Hours Number((35/60).toFixed(2))
= 0.58

Then convert 3hours 45 minutes into hours
= 3 + Number((45/60).toFixed(2))
= 3hours + 0.75 hours
= 3.75

Add the 2 conversions
= 0.58 + 3.75
= 4.33 hours

Convert the 0.33 back to minutes by multiplying by 60
= 4 hours 19.8 minutes ~ 20 mins

Hope that helps!
|improve this answer|||||
2

You have to convert them to hours and minutes first

var arr = [0.15, 0.2, 3.45, 0.4, 2, 0.3, 5.2, 1, 1.4, 1.1, 2.4, 1, 3.4];

function add(arr) {
  var hm = arr
    .map(v => [Math.floor(v), (v % 1).toFixed(2) * 100])  // Map the array to values having [hours, minutes]
    .reduce((t, v) => { //  reduce the array of [h, m] to a single object having total hours and minutes
      t = {
        h: t.h + v[0],
        m: t.m + v[1]
      };
      return t;
    }, {
      h: 0,
      m: 0
    });

  // final result would be = 
  // total hours from above
  // + hours from total minutes (retrived using Math.floor(hm.m / 60)) 
  // + minutes (after converting it to be a decimal part)
  return (parseFloat(hm.h + Math.floor(hm.m / 60)) + parseFloat(((hm.m % 60) / 100).toFixed(2))).toFixed(2);
}

// adding `arr` array
console.log(add(arr));

// adding 0.35+3.45
console.log(add([0.35, 3.45]));

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  • 2
    Unfortunately no one noticed this at first. And although probably correct, where is the learning coming in? Copy and paste from OP of your solution helps a lot of course in short run. But it was an intelligent question that deserves an intelligent explanation. – GetSet Feb 19 at 5:47
2

May I know why you want the first result to be 0? Below Is a way to do this with a single loop. Comments are in the code to explain. With each loop we add the minutes, and if they are greater than 60, we add an hour, and then use % 60 to get get the remaining minutes. Floats can be a pain to work with,

e.g 1.1 + 2.2 === 3.3 is false

So I converted the numbers to a string, and then back to an int.

var arr = [0.15, 0.2, 3.45, 0.4, 2, 0.3, 5.2, 1, 1.4, 1.1, 2.4, 1, 3.4];
let hoursTally = 0;
let minutesTally = 0;

for(var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
  // Convert the float to a string, as floats can be a pain to add together
  let time = arr[i].toString().split('.');
  // Tally up the hours.
  hoursTally += parseInt(time[0]);
  // Tally up the minutes;
  let minute = time[1];
  if(minute) {
    // We do this so we add 20 minutes, not 2 minutes
    if(minute.length < 2) {
      minutesTally += parseInt(minute) * 10;
    } else {
      minutesTally += parseInt(minute);
    }
    // If the minutesTally is greater than 60, add an hour to hours
    if(minutesTally >= 60) {
      hoursTally++;
      // Set the minutesTally to be the remainder after dividing by 60
      minutesTally = minutesTally % 60;
    }
  }
  console.log(hoursTally + "." + minutesTally);
}

|improve this answer|||||
  • uh .. by all means .. 2.2+1.1 IS 3.3 with the meaning of 3h30min – eagle275 Feb 19 at 14:30
  • 1
    toString().split('.'); - argh, really? – user253751 Feb 19 at 14:51
  • 3
    @eagle275 But the number 1.1 + 2.2 isn't 3.3 when the numbers are floating-point. It's 3.3000000000000001 or 3.29999999999999 or something. That's because 1.1 isn't really 1.1 and 2.2 isn't really 2.2 and 3.3 isn't really 3.3 in floating-point. – user253751 Feb 19 at 14:51
  • don't start splitting hairs - I wouldn't choose this weird number scheme from the start ... when I started out programming I would have probably converted everything down to minutes (or seconds if necessary) - convert them back for display .. but nowadays DateTime rules in my eyes – eagle275 Feb 19 at 15:52
1

const arr = [0.15, 0.2, 3.45, 0.4, 2, 0.3, 5.2, 1, 1.4, 1.1, 2.4, 1, 3.4]

const reducer = (acc, curr) => {
  acc = `${acc}`.split('.').length > 1 ? acc : `${acc}.0`;
  curr = `${curr}`.split('.').length > 1 ? curr : `${curr}.0`;
  let hours = parseStrAndSum(true, `${acc}`.split('.')[0], `${curr}`.split('.')[0]);
  let minute = parseStrAndSum(false, `${acc}`.split('.')[1], `${curr}`.split('.')[1]);
  hours = parseInt(hours / 1) + parseInt(minute / 60);
  minute = minute % 60;
  console.log(`${acc} + ${curr} = ${hours}.${minute}`);
  return `${hours}.${minute}`;
}

const parseStrAndSum = (is_hours, ...strs) => {
  let result = 0;
  strs.forEach(function(number) {
    if (!is_hours) {
      number = number.length == 1 ? `${number}0` : number;
    }
    result += parseInt(number);
  });
  return result;
};

arr.reduce(reducer);

|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    @lan 0.15 + 0.2 Why =0.17? Must be 0.35 – user12916796 Feb 19 at 6:38
  • 1
    At that time I thought that the decimal 0.2 was equal to two minutes instead of 20 minutes. Now that I have adjusted the code, please confirm again. – Ian Feb 19 at 6:48
1

The standard way to reduce a modulus is to add the deficit after the add if an overflow was caused. This is how you'd do BCD addition using binary hardware for instance.

Although you can do addition using floats in this way, there's a question of whether you should. The problems with using float numbers to operate on what are basically integer quantities are well known, and I'm not going to rehash them here.

Normally, the addition on float fractions works implicitly with a modulus of 1.0, an overflow out of the fraction increments the integer part. If we interpret the point as the hours.minutes separator, then we want the fraction to overflow at 0.6. This needs the deficit of 0.4 to be added at the appropriate time.

function add_float_hours_minutes(a, b)
{
  var trial_sum = a+b;
  // did an actual overflow occur, has the integer part incremented?
  if ( Math.floor(trial_sum) > Math.floor(a)+Math.floor(b) )  {
    trial_sum += 0.4;
  }
  // has the fractional part exceeded its allotted 60 minutes?
  if ( trial_sum-Math.floor(trial_sum) >= 0.6)  {
    trial_sum += 0.4;
  }
  return trial_sum;
}

var arr = [0.15, 0.2, 3.45, 0.4, 2, 0.3, 5.2, 1, 1.4, 1.1, 2.4, 1, 3.4]

var sum = 0.0;

arr.forEach(function(item) {
  console.log(sum);
  // sum += parseFloat(item);
  sum = add_float_hours_minutes(sum, parseFloat(item));
});

which produces the following output, correct to within a rounding to what the OP asked for

0
0.15
0.35
4.2
5.000000000000001
7.000000000000001
7.300000000000001
12.5
13.5
15.3
16.400000000000002
19.2
20.2

I've left the final formatting to two decimal places as an exercise for the reader. The 15 trailing digits in all their glory illustrate part of why using floats is not the best way to do this.

Also, consider what happens when you want to include seconds, or days. The two rather more standard ways of either float seconds, or a tuple of integers, suddenly look a lot more sensible.

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