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A common misconception is to think that CHAR(n) and VARCHAR(n), the n defines the number of characters. But in CHAR(n) and VARCHAR(n) the n defines the string length in bytes (0-8,000). n never defines numbers of characters that can be stored

According to this statement from Microsoft, I assume, n is the data length of a string and when we store unicode characters in varchar, a single character should take 2 bytes. But, when I try with a sample as below, I see varchar data taking 1 byte instead of 2 bytes.

declare @varchar varchar(6), @nvarchar nvarchar(6)

set @varchar = 'Ø'

select @varchar as VarcharString, len(@varchar) as VarcharStringLength, DATALENGTH(@varchar) as VarcharStringDataLength

Query Result

Could someone explain the reason behind it?

  • 3
    VARCHAR does NOT store Unicode text - NVARCHAR does. VARCHAR is always as long as the number of characters stored in it - 1 byte per character stored. – marc_s Feb 20 at 4:49
  • OK. I mistook 'Ø' for 'ǿ'. When I try to set the variable value to 'ǿ', I see that varchar cannot store it and returns ? in result. declare @varchar varchar(6) set @varchar = 'ǿ' select @varchar as VarcharString, len(@varchar) as VarcharStringLength, DATALENGTH(@varchar) as VarcharStringDataLength Does nvarchar(1) means, it can store one unicode character of size 2 bytes? – Vijay Swaroop Feb 20 at 6:17
  • A variable of type nvarchar(1) can store 1 Unicode character, and it will use up 2 bytes of space to do so – marc_s Feb 20 at 7:47
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Found time to test the assumptions of my first answer:

  • Create UTF8-enabled database

CREATE DATABASE [test-sc] COLLATE Latin1_General_100_CI_AI_KS_SC_UTF8

  • Create table with all kinds of N/VARCHAR columns

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[UTF8Test]( [Id] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL, [VarcharText] [varchar](50) COLLATE Latin1_General_100_CI_AI NULL, [VarcharTextSC] [varchar](50) COLLATE Latin1_General_100_CI_AI_KS_SC NULL, [VarcharUTF8] [varchar](50) COLLATE Latin1_General_100_CI_AI_KS_SC_UTF8 NULL, [NVarcharText] [nvarchar](50) COLLATE Latin1_General_100_CI_AI_KS NULL, [NVarcharTextSC] [nvarchar](50) COLLATE Latin1_General_100_CI_AI_KS_SC NULL, [NVarcharUTF8] [nvarchar](50) COLLATE Latin1_General_100_CI_AI_KS_SC_UTF8 NULL)

  • Insert test data from various Unicode ranges

INSERT INTO [dbo].[UTF8Test] ([VarcharText],[VarcharTextSC],[VarcharUTF8],[NVarcharText],[NVarcharTextSC],[NVarcharUTF8]) VALUES ('a','a','a','a','a','a') INSERT INTO [dbo].[UTF8Test] ([VarcharText],[VarcharTextSC],[VarcharUTF8],[NVarcharText],[NVarcharTextSC],[NVarcharUTF8]) VALUES ('ö','ö','ö',N'ö',N'ö',N'ö') -- U+56D7 INSERT INTO [dbo].[UTF8Test] ([VarcharText],[VarcharTextSC],[VarcharUTF8],[NVarcharText],[NVarcharTextSC],[NVarcharUTF8]) VALUES (N'囗',N'囗',N'囗',N'囗',N'囗',N'囗') -- U+2000B INSERT INTO [dbo].[UTF8Test] ([VarcharText],[VarcharTextSC],[VarcharUTF8],[NVarcharText],[NVarcharTextSC],[NVarcharUTF8]) VALUES (N'𠀋',N'𠀋',N'𠀋',N'𠀋',N'𠀋',N'𠀋')

  • SELECT lengths

SELECT TOP (1000) [Id] ,[VarcharText] ,[VarcharTextSC] ,[VarcharUTF8] ,[NVarcharText] ,[NVarcharTextSC] ,[NVarcharUTF8] FROM [test-sc].[dbo].[UTF8Test] SELECT TOP (1000) [Id] ,LEN([VarcharText]) VT ,LEN([VarcharTextSC]) VTSC ,LEN([VarcharUTF8]) VU ,LEN([NVarcharText]) NVT ,LEN([NVarcharTextSC]) NVTSC ,LEN([NVarcharUTF8]) NVU FROM [test-sc].[dbo].[UTF8Test] SELECT TOP (1000) [Id] ,DATALENGTH([VarcharText]) VT ,DATALENGTH([VarcharTextSC]) VTSC ,DATALENGTH([VarcharUTF8]) VU ,DATALENGTH([NVarcharText]) NVT ,DATALENGTH([NVarcharTextSC]) NVTSC ,DATALENGTH([NVarcharUTF8]) NVU FROM [test-sc].[dbo].[UTF8Test]

SELECT lengths

I was surprised to find that the old mantra "a VARCHAR only stores single byte characters" needs to be revised when using UTF8 collations.

  • Note that only table columns are associated with collations, but not T-SQL variables:

SELECT @VarcharText = [VarcharText], @NVarcharText = [NVarcharText] FROM [test-sc].[dbo].[UTF8Test] WHERE [Id] = 4 SELECT @VarcharText, Len(@VarcharText), DATALENGTH(@VarcharText), @NVarcharText, Len(@NVarcharText), DATALENGTH(@NVarcharText) SELECT @VarcharText = [VarcharTextSC], @NVarcharText = [NVarcharTextSC] FROM [test-sc].[dbo].[UTF8Test] WHERE [Id] = 4 SELECT @VarcharText, Len(@VarcharText), DATALENGTH(@VarcharText), @NVarcharText, Len(@NVarcharText), DATALENGTH(@NVarcharText) SELECT @VarcharText = [VarcharUTF8], @NVarcharText = [NVarcharUTF8] FROM [test-sc].[dbo].[UTF8Test] WHERE [Id] = 4 SELECT @VarcharText, Len(@VarcharText), DATALENGTH(@VarcharText), @NVarcharText, Len(@NVarcharText), DATALENGTH(@NVarcharText)

SELECT @Variable lengths

| improve this answer | |
  • This clears up lot of questions I have on varchar, nvarchar and encoding. Thank you for the details. I am preparing for 70-761 certification. Any suggestions for preparation material? – Vijay Swaroop Feb 21 at 0:31
  • sorry, can't help you with certification – devio Feb 21 at 6:38
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I thought the original quote was a bit confusion, as it continues

The misconception happens because when using single-byte encoding, the storage size of CHAR and VARCHAR is n bytes and the number of characters is also n.

but since it mentions encodings, my guess is that the statement refers to the UTF encodings supported in SQL Server 2019 and higher which seem to allow (I haven't tried yet) to store Unicode in VARCHAR columns.

| improve this answer | |
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declare @char varchar(4)
declare @nvarchar nvarchar(4)

Set @char = '@'
Set @nvarchar = '@'

select @char as charString, 
LEN(@char) as charStringLength,
DATALENGTH(@char) as charStringDataLength

select @nvarchar as nvarcharString, 
LEN(@nvarchar) as nvarcharStringLength,
DATALENGTH(@nvarchar) as nvarcharStringDataLength
| improve this answer | |
  • Try to run my code in SSMS and check datatype i think you wll get solution. – Jay Rindani Feb 20 at 6:40
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You can store unicode in varchar (if you want to), however every byte is interpreted as a single character, while unicode (for sql server, utf16, ucs2) uses 2 bytes for a single character and you have to account for that, when displaying unicode stored in varchar.

declare @nv nvarchar(10) = N'❤'
select @nv;

declare @v varchar(10) = cast(cast(@nv as varbinary(10)) as varchar(10))
select @v, len(@v); --two chars

select cast(@nv as varbinary(10)), cast(@v as varbinary(10)); --same bytes in both n/var char
--display nchar from char
select cast(cast(@v as varbinary(10)) as nvarchar(10));
| improve this answer | |
  • From the statement ``` declare @v varchar(10) = cast(cast(@nv as varbinary(10)) as varchar(10)) select @v, len(@v); --two chars ``` Though it appears to store the data, it won't be able to reproduce the same with select. the result is 'd''. However the size is 2 bytes. – Vijay Swaroop Feb 20 at 8:16
  • declare @v varchar(10) = cast(cast(N'A' as varbinary(10)) as varchar(10)) select @v, len(@v), '*'+@v+'*'; --two chars(where did the 2nd * go?) – lptr Feb 20 at 8:58

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