12
using Foo.Uber;

namespace MyStuff.Foo
{
    class SomeClass{
        void DoStuff(){
            // I want to reference the outer "absolute" Foo.Uber
            // but the compiler thinks I'm refering to MyStuff.Foo.Uber
            var x = Foo.Uber.Bar();
        }
    }
}

How could I solve this? Just moving the using statement inside my namespace doesn't help.

23

You can do this using a namespace alias qualifier (typically global::) to refer to the default / root namespace:

global::Foo.Uber

  • (edited to add context... words are useful) – Marc Gravell May 17 '11 at 14:00
  • 1
    Nice, I did not know this. – Jaimal Chohan May 17 '11 at 14:01
  • Thanks, first and best solution for my case. PS: I liked the unedited answer too. :p – Qtax May 17 '11 at 14:07
4

You can actually specify the full path via the root namespace

var x = global::Foo.Uber.Bar();

Namespaces Overview

A namespace has the following properties:

  • They organize large code projects.

  • They are delimited with the . operator.

  • The using directive means you do not need to specify the name of the namespace for every class.

  • The global namespace is the "root" namespace: global::system will always refer to the .NET Framework namespace System.

I prefer this over aliases because when you read it, you know exactly what is going on. Aliases can be easy to misunderstand if you skip over the definition.

3

Alias the namespace in the using statement:

using ThatOuterFoo = Foo.Uber;
...
...
//Some time later...
var x = ThatOuterFoo.Bar();
3

You can use using alias directives

using Outer = Foo.Uber;

namespace MyStuff.Foo
{
    class SomeClass{
        void DoStuff(){                
            var x = new Outer.Bar(); //outer class
        }
    }
}
2

Using Aliaseseseseseses

using Foo.Uber;
using FooUberBar = Foo.Uber.Bar

namespace MyStuff.Foo
{
    class SomeClass{
        void DoStuff(){
            // I want to reference the outer "absolute" Foo.Uber
            // but the compiler thinks I'm refering to MyStuff.Foo.Uber
            var x = FooUberBar();
        }
    }
}
  • sesesesseseseses – Allen Rice May 17 '11 at 14:08
1

You can assign an alias in your using directive as described on MSDN.

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