40

Why when I try to shift bits for 110101002, the result is 1101010002, not 101010002.

int a = Integer.parseInt("11010100", 2) << 1;

I try to do this:

int a = (byte)(Integer.parseInt("11010100", 2) << 1);

But if the output value is greater than 128, everything goes into minus, which is logical. How can I make that number of bits does not change?

  • 4
    Integer arithmetic is always done on ints or longs. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 20 at 13:55
  • 34
    You are using integers, those are 32 bits long. Why would you expect the result to be truncated to 8 bits? – jhamon Feb 20 at 13:59
  • 1
    byte a = ... will fix it. – Perdi Estaquel Feb 21 at 3:07
60

Let's take it one step at a time.

  1. Integer.parseInt("11010100", 2) - this is the int value 212. This is, by the way, needless; you can just write: 0b11010100.

  2. 0b11010100 << 1 is the same as 0b110101000, and is 424.

  3. You then cast it to a byte: (byte)(0b11010100 << 1). The bits beyond the first 8 all get lopped off, which leaves 0b10101000, which is -88. Minus, yes, because in java bytes are signed.

  4. You then silently cast this -88 back up to int, as you assign it to an int value. It remains -88, which means all the top bits are all 1s.

Hence, the final value is -88.

If you want to see 168 instead (which is the exact same bits, but shown unsigned instead of signed), the usual trick is to use & 0xFF, which sets all bits except the first 8 to 0, thus guaranteeing a positive number:

byte b = (byte) (0b11010100 << 1);
System.out.println(b); // -88. It is not possible to print 168 when printing a byte.
int asUnsigned = b & 0xFF;
System.out.println(asUnsigned); // 168.

// or in one go:

System.out.println(((byte) (0b11010100 << 1)) & 0xFF); // 168

|improve this answer|||||
  • 19
    He's storing the value in int a, so if you have & 0xFF, then you don't need to cast at all. int a = (0b11010100<< 1) & 0xFF; – Mooing Duck Feb 20 at 22:18
9

If you want to set to 0 all bits higher than the bottom 8 bits, you can use bit-wise AND:

int a = (Integer.parseInt("11010100", 2) << 1) & 0xff;
System.out.println (Integer.toString(a,2));

Output:

10101000
|improve this answer|||||
6

Try something like this:

int anInt = Integer.parseInt("11010100", 2) << 1;
int asUnsignedInt= Byte.toUnsignedInt((byte) anInt);

toUnsignedInt has been introduced in Java SE 8.

|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.