2

If you will launch this snipet it in your console

[0,1,2,3].reduce((acc, val, index) => {
  console.log(index);
  return acc;
});

You will get

1
2
3

So the question is why index starts from 1?

UPD: Probably I missing something very basic, but

[0,1,2,3].reduce((acc, val, index, initialValue) => {
  console.log(index);
  return acc;
});

gives me

1
2
3
0

UPD2: So yes, it's me missing something basic.

[0,1,2,3].reduce((acc, val, index) => {
  console.log(index);
  return acc;
}, 0);
8
  • Is it something obvious? Or what is the reason for downvote? – Volodymyr I. Feb 20 '20 at 14:11
  • 3
    This is answered in the documentation on MDN: "A value to use as the first argument to the first call of the callback. If no initialValue is supplied, the first element in the array will be used and skipped." – user47589 Feb 20 '20 at 14:12
  • 1
    @bananabrann I'll restate the core of my objection: I realize this is something about which reasonable people could have different opinions. I disagree with yours, but I don't think it's so wrong that it's worth calling you names in public over... downvotes (to me at least) are not personal, the way, say, name-calling is. – Jared Smith Feb 20 '20 at 14:19
  • 1
    @Amy you probably won't believe me but before asking I was reading that doc. Sometimes it's just not obvious even if it is. – Volodymyr I. Feb 20 '20 at 14:27
  • 1
    If you’re upset about the petty remark, that I’m sorry for. Though I still hold my original thinking, I did not mean an intentional attack of character – bananabrann Feb 20 '20 at 14:44
7

Because you have not provided an initialValue argument. From the docs:

If no initialValue is supplied, the first element in the array will be used and skipped

And reading further, there's a direct answer to your question:

Note: If initialValue is not provided, reduce() will execute the callback function starting at index 1, skipping the first index. If initialValue is provided, it will start at index 0.

More info here

3
  • I've updated my question, please can you explain my more on how can I make it start from 0 in my example? – Volodymyr I. Feb 20 '20 at 14:18
  • 2
    initialValue is a second argument to the reduce() and not a fourth argument to the callback. Like this: .reduce((acc, currentValue, index) => {...}, initialValue); – Sebastian Kaczmarek Feb 20 '20 at 14:19
  • 1
    @VolodymyrI. as a generally rule of thumb you almost never want to use an unseeded reduce (we all do it sometimes even though we shouldn't): it will throw on an empty array, it can make it hard to understand the code, etc. – Jared Smith Feb 20 '20 at 15:59

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