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I am using Next.js and want to add an active class to a nav link when the page it links to matches the url. But I also want it to be active when the url is deeper than only the page.

For example, a nav link to /register would be "active" for:

  • /register
  • /register/sign-up
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  • What is next.js? obviously a JavaScript file, but it could literally contain anything, how is anyone supposed to help based on the little information provided in your post?
    – SPlatten
    Feb 20, 2020 at 16:06
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    @SPlatte. nextjs.org. I thought it was obvious with it being so well known in the industry. Feb 20, 2020 at 16:08
  • Not to anyone not familiar with react. Have you tried embedding the URI in an iframe?
    – SPlatten
    Feb 20, 2020 at 16:14
  • No. I think that would be overkill. I have used this and it works fine (flaviocopes.com/nextjs-active-link), But only for one layer. It doesn't work for deeper segmented urls @SPlatten Feb 20, 2020 at 16:32

1 Answer 1

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Here's a NavLink component I wrote for Next.js. It has the same API as Link, with the addition of two props:

  • an activeClassName that will be applied to the link when it matches
  • (optional) exact - prevents matching “deeper” routes)
import React from 'react';
import Link from 'next/link';
import { useRouter } from 'next/router';

export default function NavLink({ href, as, exact, activeClassName, children, ...props }) {
  const { asPath } = useRouter();
  // Normalize and split paths into their segments
  const segment = (p) => new URL(p, 'http://example.com').pathname.split('/').filter(s => s);
  const currentPath = segment(asPath);
  const targetPath = segment(as || href);
  // The route is active if all of the following are true:
  //   1. There are at least as many segments in the current route as in the destination route
  //   2. The current route matches the destination route
  //   3. If we're in “exact" mode, there are no extra path segments at the end
  const isActive = currentPath.length >= targetPath.length
    && targetPath.every((p, i) => currentPath[i] === p)
    && (!exact || targetPath.length === currentPath.length);

  const child = React.Children.only(children);
  const className = ((child.props.className || '') + ' ' + (isActive ? activeClassName : '')).trim();

  return (
    <Link href={href} as={as} {...props}>
      {React.cloneElement(child, { className })}
    </Link>
  );
}

It's possible to make this simpler and more robust by relying on the route-matching functionality from the path-to-regexp module, which is already a dependency of Next.js:

import React from 'react';
import Link from 'next/link';
import { useRouter } from 'next/router';
import { pathToRegexp } from 'path-to-regexp';

export default function NavLink({ href, as, exact, activeClassName, children, ...props }) {
  const { asPath } = useRouter();
  const isActive = pathToRegexp(as || href, [], { sensitive: true, end: !!exact }).test(asPath);

  const child = React.Children.only(children);
  const className = ((child.props.className || '') + ' ' + (isActive ? activeClassName : '')).trim();

  return (
    <Link href={href} as={as} {...props}>
      {React.cloneElement(child, { className })}
    </Link>
  );
}

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