12

That is to make this:

[ ['dog','cat', ['chicken', 'bear'] ],['mouse','horse'] ]

into:

['dog','cat','chicken','bear','mouse','horse']

  • 2
    You could simply replace all [ and ] with an empty string and then add a leading and ending bracket. – pimvdb May 17 '11 at 15:07
  • 3
    That isn't JSON. – Quentin May 17 '11 at 15:10
  • 1
    So what is that thing properly called, an object , an array ? – rsk82 May 17 '11 at 15:14
  • Ok, I now - array, edited. – rsk82 May 17 '11 at 15:21
  • 1
    an array. Look at tech.karbassi.com/2009/12/17/pure-javascript-flatten-array – Swift May 17 '11 at 15:21

13 Answers 13

25
var flattened = [[0, 1], [2, 3], [4, 5]].reduce(function(a, b) {
  return a.concat(b);
});
// flattened is [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

It's note worthy that reduce isn't supported in IE 8 and lower.

developer.mozilla.org reference

  • 2
    This doesn't do what the OP wanted. It produces ["dog","cat",["chicken","bear"],"mouse","horse"] leaving the inner array as an array instead of flattening its elements as well. – Craig M Jul 22 '13 at 22:10
  • True True, I just figured the concept is what he needed, and it looks like he got it from there. – ChewOnThis_Trident Jul 22 '13 at 22:46
23

In modern browsers you can do this without any external libraries in a few lines:

Array.prototype.flatten = function() {
  return this.reduce(function(prev, cur) {
    var more = [].concat(cur).some(Array.isArray);
    return prev.concat(more ? cur.flatten() : cur);
  },[]);
};

console.log([['dog','cat',['chicken', 'bear']],['mouse','horse']].flatten());
//^ ["dog", "cat", "chicken", "bear", "mouse", "horse"]
  • This should be the accepted answer – neatnick May 14 '15 at 17:04
10

Grab underscore.js and use the flatten function.

_.flatten([ ['dog','cat', ['chicken', 'bear'] ],['mouse','horse'] ]);
  • THIS should be the accepted answer. No need to reinvent the wheel :) – Marco Sulla Feb 25 '16 at 12:56
  • some people don't want to load a new script just for one functionality! – Rathma Jan 22 '17 at 10:15
7

What about this one liner code ?

console.log([['dog', 'cat', ['chicken', 'bear']], [['mouse', 'horse'], 'lion']].join().split(','));

basically join will make comma separated string from nested array and using split you can get 1d array, nice ? bonus it'll work on all major browsers as well :)

5

Small fix for ChewOnThis_Trident solution and it works perfect:

Array.prototype.flatten = function() {
    return this.reduce(function(a, b) {
        return a.concat(b);
    }, []);
};
4

Assuming an array that's already unpacked from JSON, try this:

Array.prototype.flatten = function() {
    var r = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; ++i) {
        var v = this[i];
        if (v instanceof Array) {
            Array.prototype.push.apply(this, v.flatten());
        } else {
            r.push(v);
        }
    }
    return r;
};

It appears to work correctly on your input - see http://jsfiddle.net/alnitak/Ws7L5/

  • That isn't necessarily true, look at jsfiddle.net/theycallmeswift/qfpGK/1 – Swift May 17 '11 at 15:21
  • yup, alert is flattening. console.log() shows correct result. – Alnitak May 17 '11 at 15:25
  • p.s. downvote is harsh for code that actually worked but didn't show the result correctly due to unexpected alert() behaviour – Alnitak May 17 '11 at 15:29
  • Valid point. Sorry, its been a long morning. – Swift May 17 '11 at 15:33
2

Now in 2019 you can easily use Array.flat with whatever depth you want.

let arr  = [ ['dog','cat', ['chicken', 'bear'] ],['mouse','horse'] ]

let op = arr.flat(Infinity)

console.log(op)

Now if you want to get unique values you can combine both Set and flat

let arr  = [ ['dog','cat', ['chicken', 'bear', 'cat'] ],['mouse','horse', 'dog'], [[[['deeper','chicken']]]] ]

let unique  = [...new Set(arr.flat(Infinity))]

console.log(unique)
Browser comparability Except IE all other seems to support for IE you can use polyfill.

  • Random question but whats the best resource to see how node maps to chrome versions? Found this thread after trying to use array.flat() in node 10.15.3 and having it fail despite appearing to be a valid chrome js function. – sirclesam May 9 at 18:42
1

I know this is late but I also ran into a situation where I needed to make a multidimensional array into 1 array and I made a function as follows.

function nested(arr) {
    var noNest = arr.toString().split(',').filter(Boolean),
        i = 0;

    for(i;i<noNest.length; i++){
        if(isNaN(noNest[i])){
            return console.log(noNest);
        } else {
            noNest[i] = parseInt(noNest[i]);
        }
    }
    return console.log(noNest);
}

nested([[['a']], [['b']]]);

This also take the nested arrays inside the tested array and makes sure its one array as the final out put

  • I don't need to have the Filter on it but as it currently is, this will automatically turn the numbers that are strings into integers but that is easily editable. I'm sure someone will also find this useful and not run in circles like I had to – TrojanMorse Apr 30 '15 at 18:34
1

This solution has been working great for me, and i find it particularly easy to follow:

function flattenArray(arr) {
  // the new flattened array
  var newArr = [];

  // recursive function
  function flatten(arr, newArr) {
    // go through array
    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
      // if element i of the current array is a non-array value push it
      if (Array.isArray(arr[i]) === false) {
        newArr.push(arr[i]);
      }
      // else the element is an array, so unwrap it
      else {
        flatten(arr[i], newArr);
      }
    }
  }

  flatten(arr, newArr);

  return newArr;
}
1

That's why I love javascript:

function flattenArray(source) {
  return source.toString().split(',');
}

flattenArray([['dog', 'cat', ['chicken', 'bear']], ['mouse', 'horse']]);
// -> ['dog','cat','chicken','bear','mouse','horse']
  • 2
    It's cool when the array is small and the words don't have "," inside, once it grows, performance can be an issue. – calbertts Jun 28 '17 at 8:24
1

The easiest way of flattening the Objects of any depth would be using the flat method

var arr = [['dog','cat', ['chicken', 'bear']],[['mouse','horse'],'lion'] ]; 
var flattened = arr.flat(Infinity);
//output--> ["dog", "cat", "chicken", "bear", "mouse", "horse", "lion"]

More aout Flat()

0

One approach you could take would be, using the JSON2 library:

  1. JSON.stringify the array
  2. Strip out all but the first and last [ and ] (or strip all of them and add the start and end ones back in).
  3. JSON.parse it back to a JavaScript array

I'm assuming, of course, you aren starting with a JavaScript array. If its a string, then steps 1 and 3 are irrelevant.

  • JSON.stringify internally loops recursively over the array, so in this method you go over it all twice..so you might want to just do the recursion yourself and push all encountered "numbers" to a new array, and return that one – vsync Jul 2 '11 at 15:06
  • lol...+1 for creativity....just be careful not to remove any square brackets from inside quoted values! It's a crazy idea, but it could work. ( in reality, just use lodash.flatten ) – Nick Perkins May 5 '16 at 14:27
0

ES6 way of doing this would be

[['a', 'b'], ['c', 'd']].reduce((x,v) => [...x, ...v], [])

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