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The homework is requiring us to find out the probabilities of 2 to 12 as the sum by experiment. We want to roll two dices 1000 times and count the number of times the sum is 2, 3, …, and 12. I have this as my code so far, but im unable to get the output that the professor is asking for. output of ex. code

What I have so far:

import random as r

die_1 = r.randint(1,6)
die_2 = r.randint(1,6)


print('For-Loop')
for i in range(2,13):
    r.seed(1)
    counter = 0
    for j in range(1000):
        if i == r.randint(2,12):
            counter = counter + 1
    print("sum = ", i,  " count = ",  counter)
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  • You roll your dice 11 * 1000 times. It's no big deal, but your description says differently. Feb 21, 2020 at 17:57
  • 1
    @finefoot does not mean link to the image - he/she means paste the code into the body of the question please.
    – modesitt
    Feb 21, 2020 at 18:06
  • You don’t say what she is looking for, but probabilities are in the range 0 to 1, so maybe just divide your values by the total of all your values Feb 21, 2020 at 18:07
  • but im unable to get the output that the professor is asking for. What does that mean?
    – AMC
    Feb 21, 2020 at 19:00
  • @AMC I added a picture of what the example output looks like
    – c_S71
    Feb 21, 2020 at 19:20

3 Answers 3

4
from random import randint

rolls = [sum([randint(1, 6), randint(1, 6)]) for i in range(1000)]

for i in range(2, 13):
    print(f'Sum of {i} was rolled {rolls.count(i)} times')
1
  • Binomial theorem
    – ifly6
    Sep 8, 2020 at 19:09
4

I have tried to explain everything that's happening in the comments:

from collections import defaultdict
from random import randint

# Roll the two dice how many times?
n = 1000

# Create a dictionary to store the results
results = defaultdict(int)

# Loop n times
for _ in range(n):
    # Get random numbers for the two dice
    die_1 = randint(1, 6)
    die_2 = randint(1, 6)
    # Increase the corresponding result by 1
    results[die_1 + die_2] += 1

# Print results
print(results)

Which might print something like this:

defaultdict(<class 'int'>, {7: 160, 8: 134, 6: 145, 9: 107, 3: 50, 10: 76, 12: 26, 4: 86, 5: 128, 2: 37, 11: 51})

You can also easily illustrate the results with a plot:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
plt.bar(results.keys(), results.values())
plt.show()

enter image description here

1
  • 1
    if you are wondering why the plot looks like this OP, the convolution of two nice distributions is nice and N(\mu, \sigma) is the nicest of them all - even discretely ;)
    – modesitt
    Feb 21, 2020 at 18:09
3

You are not correctly accounting for the probabilities. r.randint(2, 12) is not the same as independently rolling two die (as their are multiple rolls of two that sum to the same value, for some values).

import collections
import random

print("For Loop")

occurrences = []
for trial in range(1000):
    die1 = random.randint(1, 6)
    die2 = random.randing(1, 6)
    occurrences.append(die1 + die2)
counter = collections.Counter(occurrences)
for roll, count in counter.items():
    print(f"sum = {roll} count = {count}") 

if you do not want to import other parts of the standard library you can make the counter yourself.

import random

print("For Loop")
occurrences = {}
for trial in range(1000):
    die1 = random.randint(1, 6)
    die2 = random.randing(1, 6)
    roll = die1 + die2
    current = occurrences.setdefault(roll, 0)
    occurrences[roll] = current + 1

for roll, count in occurrences.items():
    print(f"sum = {roll} count = {count}")

note that the outputs will be slightly different as their is, of course, randomness involved.

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