1

I have a model class that has an array of objects which I want to store in the database. In order to fit this data into a single row and column; I have a get property which concatenates the array and returns a single string. I want to store this concatenated string in the database.

[NotMapped]
public object[] Values { get; set; }

public string Value
{
    get
    {
        return string.Join("|", this.Values);
    }
}

I have confirmed that the Value property contains the string that I expect. However, this does not save to the database; it just saves it as NULL. I do not have any special mapping code in place; it is relying on the defaults of having the column name match the property name.

The closest thing I have found it this tutorial which describes using the HasField() method to map the column to a private field instead of a property; but in my case it's not just that I have a private set; it's that I don't have any set property at all.

  • 1
    Why don't you just set the string Value field in the set method of object[] Values too? – Adolfo F. Ibarra Landeo Feb 21 '20 at 20:32
  • @AdolfoF.IbarraLandeo I actually got that idea almost right after posting the question... since the object is being created by automatically parsing Json with Newtonsoft, I wasn't sure if it would have an issue with a property being more complex than a normal get/set; but it seems to work!. I am still curious about the question as-asked; because doing it this way seems like a workaround; and it wouldn't work if, for example, the get-only property were not simply calculated based on another property I already have. – GendoIkari Feb 21 '20 at 20:43
  • @Gendolkari, can you explain what do you mean with the last thing you said? Do you mean if Value needs to be calculated using more than one single property? – Adolfo F. Ibarra Landeo Feb 21 '20 at 20:44
  • As a trivial though maybe-not-useful example, what if Value returned DateTime.Now instead? Or, yes, such as if Value were based on multiple properties. – GendoIkari Feb 21 '20 at 20:50
  • 1
    Well, in that case you have two options: 1: Create a blank setter and leave the return logic in the get accessor, as @Claudio Valerio suggested (for simple scenarios) 2: Create a setter for that property to take the values from the properties you want and store the result in a private field, then, retrieve that private one from the get accessor. (for more complex scenarios). – Adolfo F. Ibarra Landeo Feb 21 '20 at 21:20
1

Why don't you just do somethig like this?

private object[] values;

[NotMapped]
public object[] Values { 
    get => values;
    set {
        if (value != values);
        values = value;
        Value = string.Join("|", value);
    }
}

public string Value { get; set; }
  • When I create a new instance would this work correctly? var object = new MyObject { Values = new[] {"one", "two"}, Value = "Another values" } – Fabio Feb 22 '20 at 6:35
1

You can trick EF by doing something like this:

[NotMapped]
public object[] Values { get; set; }

public string Value
{
    get
    {
        return string.Join("|", this.Values);
    }
    set {}
}

Setter won't do anything, so you achieve what you want.

  • I'm actually surprised that this works, but it does! It feels a bit more hacky than the other solution though; very weird quirk in EF apparently. – GendoIkari Feb 21 '20 at 21:09
1

Another approach not to mix business and persistence structures.

Other parts of application should care/know how data is stored.

public class BusinessObject
{
    public object[] Values { get; set; }
}

public class ValuesEntity
{
    public static ValuesEntity From(BusinessObject object)
    {
        return new ValuesEntity { Values = string.Join("|", object.Values) };
    }

    public string Values { set; set; }

    public BusinessObject ToBusinessObject()
    {
        return new BusinessObject { Values = Values.Split("|") };
    }
}

With this approach you will explicitly "tell" other developers or reader of the code your intentions.
Working with different classes for each responsibility(business logic or persistence) will be simpler because both responsibilities are isolated from each other.

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