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I want to reduce typing System and other root namespaces, for example

[string] $ComputerName = [Environment]::MachineName

vs.

[System.String] $ComputerName = [System.Environment]::MachineName

Another example:

[Net.Dns]::GetHostEntry("192.168.1.1")

vs.

[System.Net.Dns]::GetHostEntry("192.168.1.1")

Are there any reasons and specific situation when typing System and similar parent namespaces is required?

I often wonder why is there System namespace after all since everything is inside that namespace so what the deal with that namespace? it's a nonsense; what is the term System supposed to mean anyway? it's not related to operating system here. but to everything in NET framework.

I assume that there may be exceptions when calling static methods, but I don't know C# so unable to answer this myself.

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    Along what 'Mathias R. Jessen' is saying, without using the full namespace, you lose the IntelliSense when dot referencing stuff off the [System] root, thus forcing you to have already memorized the child of that [System.] beforehand. Who has a photographic/eidetic memory of all of those? So, even with leveraging the 'using namespace System.Net', pointed to, sure, you don't have to type [System], but you still to know what you want to use, which means using [System.] to find it, then use the shorthand after. So, no real escaping its use 100%. – postanote Feb 23 '20 at 22:46
  • Intellisense, uh man, now I understand why it doesn't work sometimes! thanks for mentioning. – metablaster Feb 24 '20 at 4:03
  • No worries, and I kind of figured that was part of what you were driving for as well. I had this self-discovery a while back. – postanote Feb 24 '20 at 4:07
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In somewhat jumbled order:

it's a nonsense; what is the term System supposed to mean anyway?

The "System" in question is the .NET runtime and framework. The original idea, as far as I understand, was that code that doesn't ship with .NET would fall under different namespaces - but multiple Microsoft-authored components built on top of .NET has since made use of System parent namespace - including all the APIs that make up PowerShell itself.

I often wonder why is there [a] System namespace after all since everything is inside that namespace so what the deal with that namespace?

Not "everything" is inside the System namespace, but as mentioned above, everything that ships with the runtime or base class libary is - which is exactly why PowerShell automatically resolve type literals even if you omit System. from a qualified type name - PowerShell is trying to help you reduce typing already

Are there any reasons and specific situation when typing System and similar parent namespaces is required?

Yes - when the parent namespace is not System.

The first example that comes to mind is the .NET wrapper classes for the Win32 registry API on Windows:

$HKLM = [Microsoft.Win32.RegistryKey]::OpenBaseKey([Microsoft.Win32.RegistryHive]::LocalMachine, [Microsoft.Win32.RegistryView]::Default)

Now, for the actual question:

I want to reduce typing System and other root namespaces

You can't add custom namespace prefixes (like System) to PowerShell's name resolution method, but you can declare automatic resolution of type names in specific namespaces in PowerShell 5 and up, with the using namespace directive.

Without using namespace:

[System.Net.Dns]::GetHostEntry("192.168.1.1")

With using namespace:

using namespace System.Net

[Dns]::GetHostEntry("192.168.1.1")

When used in a script, any using directives must precede anything else in the file, including the param block.

using namespace directives will work in an interactive session as well, granted that you issue it as a separate statement:

PS> using namespace System.Net 
PS> [Dns] # still works!
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  • You beat me to it and very well put! (+1) – Theo Feb 23 '20 at 20:20
  • I see, so the System is actually the same as std in C++. therefore avoiding System is almost always safe in powershell? – metablaster Feb 23 '20 at 20:21
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    @metablaster kinda, except it's not quite comparable - omitting System only works in PowerShell because it deliberately (and silently) adds it for you when you omit it from a type name, the namespace of which doesn't already resolve – Mathias R. Jessen Feb 23 '20 at 20:25
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By the way, powershell has a lot of "type accelerators" like [datetime], can you make your own, like [dt]: Boolean and bool difference?

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    thank you, this is link from my own question, but I posted a new one since this is specific to NET namespaces. PowerShell is awesome and I'm obviously learning the basics :) – metablaster Feb 23 '20 at 21:42

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