-1

Can you help me to implement one Accumulator from List of maps?.

[
 %{
    score: 1,
    name: "Javascript",
 },
 %{
    score: 2,
    name: "Elixir",
 },
 %{
    score: 10,
    name: "Elixir",
 }
]

The result should be:

[
    %{
        score: 12,
        name: "Elixir",
    },
    %{
        score: 1,
        name: "Javascript",
    }
]

I will appreciate your suggestion.

Regards

  • 1
    When asking these sorts of questions, you should share whatever research you've done and any code you've already tried. As it stands right now, it appears (no doubt incorrectly) that you didn't make any effort to solve your own problem before posting here. – Onorio Catenacci Feb 24 at 21:14
1

Assuming your original list is stored in input local variable, one might start with Enum.reduce/3 using Map.update/4 as a reducer.

Enum.reduce(input, %{}, fn %{score: score, name: name}, acc ->
  Map.update(acc, name, score, & &1 + score)
end)
#⇒ %{"Elixir" => 12, "Javascript" => 1}

Whether you insist on having a list of maps as a result (which is way less readable IMSO,) go further and Enum.map/2 the result:

Enum.map(%{"Elixir" => 12, "Javascript" => 1}, fn {name, score} ->
  %{name: name, score: score}
end)
#⇒ [%{name: "Elixir", score: 12},
#   %{name: "Javascript", score: 1}]

To sum it up:

input
|> Enum.reduce(%{}, fn %{score: score, name: name}, acc ->
  Map.update(acc, name, score, & &1 + score)
end)
|> Enum.map(& %{name: elem(&1, 0), score: elem(&1, 1)})
#⇒ [%{name: "Elixir", score: 12},
#   %{name: "Javascript", score: 1}]

Sidenote: maps in (and, hence, in ) are not ordered. That means, if you want the resulting list to be sorted by name, or by score, you should explicitly Enum.sort/2 it:

Enum.sort(..., & &1.score > &2.score)
#⇒ [%{name: "Elixir", score: 12},
#   %{name: "Javascript", score: 1}]
|improve this answer|||||
1

A simple way could be to use Enum.group_by/3 to group the items by name, then Enum.sum/1 to sum the scores:

list
|> Enum.group_by(& &1.name, & &1.score)
|> Enum.map(fn {name, score} -> %{name: name, score: Enum.sum(score)} end)

Output:

[%{name: "Elixir", score: 12}, %{name: "Javascript", score: 1}]
|improve this answer|||||
1

If you were looking to create & use a more generalized solution, you could create your own Merger module.

defmodule Merger do
  def merge_by(enumerable, name_fun, merge_fun) do
    enumerable
    |> Enum.group_by(name_fun)
    |> Enum.map(fn {_name, items} -> Enum.reduce(items, merge_fun) end)
  end
end

list = [
 %{score: 1, name: "Javascript"},
 %{score: 2, name: "Elixir"},
 %{score: 10, name: "Elixir"}
]

Merger.merge_by(list, & &1.name, &%{&1 | score: &1.score + &2.score})
# => [%{name: "Elixir", score: 12}, %{name: "Javascript", score: 1}]
|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.