62

I have a PowerShell script to add a website to a Trusted Sites in Internet Explorer:

set-location "HKCU:\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet Settings"
set-location ZoneMap\Domains
new-item TESTSERVERNAME
set-location TESTSERVERNAME
new-itemproperty . -Name http -Value 2 -Type DWORD

I want to execute these PowerShell commands from a batch file. It seems simple when I have to run a single command, BUT in this case I have a sequence of related commands. I want to avoid creating a separate file for the PS script to be called from the batch - everything must be in the batch file.

The question is: How to execute PowerShell commands (or statements) from a batch file?

1
99

This is what the code would look like in a batch file(tested, works):

powershell -Command "& {set-location 'HKCU:\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet Settings'; set-location ZoneMap\Domains; new-item SERVERNAME; set-location SERVERNAME; new-itemproperty . -Name http -Value 2 -Type DWORD;}"

Based on the information from:

http://dmitrysotnikov.wordpress.com/2008/06/27/powershell-script-in-a-bat-file/

4
  • 3
    how I can split long lines ? lines similar to your example.
    – JuanPablo
    Oct 8 '13 at 14:08
  • @JuanPablo Sorry for VERY late reply but only today made a commitment to review my stackoverflow usage and be more active. Did you get this answered? Jul 13 '18 at 10:27
  • Is it possible to pass multiple .ps1 files ?
    – Ali123
    Jan 20 '20 at 11:36
  • Can you give an example? Sounds like another question. Jan 20 '20 at 11:52
10

Type in cmd.exe Powershell -Help and see the examples.

7

This solution is similar to walid2mi (thank you for inspiration), but allows the standard console input by the Read-Host cmdlet.

pros:

  • can be run like standard .cmd file
  • only one file for batch and powershell script
  • powershell script may be multi-line (easy to read script)
  • allows the standard console input (use the Read-Host cmdlet by standard way)

cons:

  • requires powershell version 2.0+

Commented and runable example of batch-ps-script.cmd:

<# : Begin batch (batch script is in commentary of powershell v2.0+)
@echo off
: Use local variables
setlocal
: Change current directory to script location - useful for including .ps1 files
cd %~dp0
: Invoke this file as powershell expression
powershell -executionpolicy remotesigned -Command "Invoke-Expression $([System.IO.File]::ReadAllText('%~f0'))"
: Restore environment variables present before setlocal and restore current directory
endlocal
: End batch - go to end of file
goto:eof
#>
# here start your powershell script

# example: include another .ps1 scripts (commented, for quick copy-paste and test run)
#. ".\anotherScript.ps1"

# example: standard input from console
$variableInput = Read-Host "Continue? [Y/N]"
if ($variableInput -ne "Y") {
    Write-Host "Exit script..."
    break
}

# example: call standard powershell command
Get-Item .

Snippet for .cmd file:

<# : batch script
@echo off
setlocal
cd %~dp0
powershell -executionpolicy remotesigned -Command "Invoke-Expression $([System.IO.File]::ReadAllText('%~f0'))"
endlocal
goto:eof
#>
# here write your powershell commands...
3
  • Usage note: there are some edge cases where cd %~dp0 won't work, and this style of invocation will set $PSScriptRoot to null, because we're running as a series of commands instead of as a script. I've dropped the cd %~dp0 and changed the invoked expression to $($ScriptHome = '%~dp0'; [System.IO.File]::ReadAllText('%~dpf0')) to handle this.
    – Tydaeus
    Nov 30 '18 at 23:53
  • Do I include the # in my powershell commands? Apr 20 at 16:28
  • @JustinGoldberg - <# comment block for powershell #> - in this comment block is .bat/.cmd commands for powershell run, and after that comment block you can use any powershell syntax with a # :)
    – kapitanrum
    Apr 22 at 6:09
5

untested.cmd

;@echo off
;Findstr -rbv ; %0 | powershell -c - 
;goto:sCode

set-location "HKCU:\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet Settings"
set-location ZoneMap\Domains
new-item TESTSERVERNAME
set-location TESTSERVERNAME
new-itemproperty . -Name http -Value 2 -Type DWORD

;:sCode 
;echo done
;pause & goto :eof
1

Looking for the possibility to put a powershell script into a batch file, I found this thread. The idea of walid2mi did not worked 100% for my script. But via a temporary file, containing the script it worked out. Here is the skeleton of the batch file:

;@echo off
;setlocal ENABLEEXTENSIONS
;rem make from X.bat a X.ps1 by removing all lines starting with ';' 
;Findstr -rbv "^[;]" %0 > %~dpn0.ps1 
;powershell -ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted -File %~dpn0.ps1 %*
;del %~dpn0.ps1
;endlocal
;goto :EOF
;rem Here start your power shell script.
param(
    ,[switch]$help
)
0

When calling multiline PowerShell statements from a batch file, end each line with a caret, except the last line. You don't have to have the extra spacing at the beginning of the line, that's my convention.

PowerShell set-location "HKCU:\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet Settings" ^
           set-location ZoneMap\Domains ^
           new-item TESTSERVERNAME ^
           set-location TESTSERVERNAME ^
           new-itemproperty . -Name http -Value 2 -Type DWORD

If you are piping into a cmdlet like Select-Object, you need to terminate with a semicolon to end the command, otherwise it will include the next line.

Powershell $disk = Get-WmiObject Win32_LogicalDisk -Filter """"DeviceID='D:'"""" ^| Select-Object Freespace; ^
           Exit ([math]::truncate($disk.freespace / 1GB))

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