4

I'm receiving raw html snippets from a headless CMS that I need to render as-is in a Sapper application.

This also includes cases where I receive an opening tag and the corresponding closing tag as two pieces of HTML between which I add a Svelte component.

<script>
    import MyComponent from './MyComponent.svelte'

    // example snippets coming from headless CMS
    const prefix = '<p class="test">' 
    const suffix = '</p>'
</script>

<!-- use snippets as-is -->
{@html prefix}
<MyComponent />
{@html suffix}

See https://svelte.dev/repl/4c1bf80ae00e476587344b6065e7346e?version=3.19.1

However, Svelte expects each item rendered with @html to be self contained element and tries to "fix" common errors. For example, it will add a closing tag to the prefix-snippet, moving the <MyComponent/>-part out of the p.

Is there a way to circumvent this behavior in general? Or more specifically - is it possible to surround rendered components with arbitrary raw HTML?

As a side node: this runs as a sapper app and the server side rendered version of the page does correctly emit the raw HTML. It's when the client side rendering kicks in that the behavior changes.

3 Answers 3

2

Here's a wicked way...

DISCLAIMER Moving Svelte managed elements under its feet can't possibly be a good idea and I totally fail to appreciate what adverse side effects you might encounter next!

I especially recommend against using this in {#each} blocks, and especially keyed ones, since Svelte will want to reorder its elements and might be upset if they're not where it expects them in the DOM.

... but maybe it can get you unstuck for simple cases. You be the judge.

My idea is to render the full concatenated string (prefix + suffix) with an additional element I can grab and replace with a component already rendered independently by Svelte, outside of this fragment.

Here's the trick:

{@html prefix + '<span id="vslot"></span>' + suffix}

Here's an example component that implements the trick:

<script>
    import { afterUpdate } from 'svelte'

    export let prefix
    export let suffix

    let wrap
    let content

    afterUpdate(() => {
        const vslot = wrap.querySelector('#vslot')
        vslot.parentNode.replaceChild(content, vslot)
    })
</script>

<div bind:this={wrap}>
    {@html prefix + '<span id="vslot"></span>' + suffix}
</div>

<div bind:this={content}>
    <slot />
</div>

You would consume it like this:

<Wrapper {prefix} {suffix}>
    <MyComponent />
</Wrapper>

REPL

0

You can use slots in order to achieve a similar result by wrapping component inside another component. Here is official documentation: https://svelte.dev/tutorial/slots

3
  • 1
    I know about (and use) slots, but I'm not sure how they would help me here. The html snippets are strings returned by the server. They are not components themselves that could use the slot mechanisms. Feb 25, 2020 at 22:16
  • Can this one help you?: <script> const prefix = '<p class="test">' ; const suffix = '</p>'; const getComposed = () => { return prefix + '<MyComponent/>' + suffix; } </script> { @html getComposed() }
    – sasha
    Feb 26, 2020 at 8:56
  • 1
    That won't work. Svelte won't interpret '<MyComponent/>' as a component to instantiate. The final HTML will be something like <p class="test"><mycomponent/></p> without MyComponent being involved at all. Feb 26, 2020 at 12:31
0

This would be a way to generate the html of the component and show all three concatenated strings in the {@html}

REPL

<script>
    import Component from './Component.svelte';

    function getHtml() {
        const div = document.createElement('div')
        new Component({
            target: div
        })
        return div.innerHTML
    }

    let a = '<p>This is the first part of html. '
    let b = ' This is the other part of html.</p>'

</script>

<div>
 {@html a + getHtml() + b }
</div>

While this would work 'visually', the functionality of the component like a click event wouldn't. So an alternative way would be via a component

REPL

<script>
    import {onMount} from 'svelte'

    export let prefix
    export let suffix
    export let component
    export let props

    let wrapper

    const string = prefix + `<span class="split-html-target"></span>` + suffix

    onMount(() => {
        const target = wrapper.querySelector('.split-html-target')
        new component({
            target,
            props
        })
    })
</script>

<div bind:this={wrapper}>
    {@html string}
</div>

<style>
    div {
        display: contents;
    }
</style>

Similar to @rixo's answer, but with creating the element via the Client-side component API without moving it in the DOM. But the target element will remain in the DOM and the risk of building an unvalid structure (like a div inside a p) is quite high so use only if really necessary and with caution

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