79

How do you send and receive UDP multicast in Python? Is there a standard library to do so?

10 Answers 10

86

This works for me:

Receive

import socket
import struct

MCAST_GRP = '224.1.1.1'
MCAST_PORT = 5007
IS_ALL_GROUPS = True

sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_DGRAM, socket.IPPROTO_UDP)
sock.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_REUSEADDR, 1)
if IS_ALL_GROUPS:
    # on this port, receives ALL multicast groups
    sock.bind(('', MCAST_PORT))
else:
    # on this port, listen ONLY to MCAST_GRP
    sock.bind((MCAST_GRP, MCAST_PORT))
mreq = struct.pack("4sl", socket.inet_aton(MCAST_GRP), socket.INADDR_ANY)

sock.setsockopt(socket.IPPROTO_IP, socket.IP_ADD_MEMBERSHIP, mreq)

while True:
  print sock.recv(10240)

Send

import socket

MCAST_GRP = '224.1.1.1'
MCAST_PORT = 5007
# regarding socket.IP_MULTICAST_TTL
# ---------------------------------
# for all packets sent, after two hops on the network the packet will not 
# be re-sent/broadcast (see https://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Multicast-HOWTO-6.html)
MULTICAST_TTL = 2

sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_DGRAM, socket.IPPROTO_UDP)
sock.setsockopt(socket.IPPROTO_IP, socket.IP_MULTICAST_TTL, MULTICAST_TTL)
sock.sendto("robot", (MCAST_GRP, MCAST_PORT))

It is based off the examples from http://wiki.python.org/moin/UdpCommunication which didn't work.

My system is... Linux 2.6.31-15-generic #50-Ubuntu SMP Tue Nov 10 14:54:29 UTC 2009 i686 GNU/Linux Python 2.6.4

  • 6
    For mac os x you need to use the socket.SO_REUSEPORT option as an alternative to socket.SO_REUSEADDR in the above example, to permit multiple listeners on the same multicast port address combination. – atikat Sep 8 '11 at 5:01
  • For sending, i also needed "sock.bind((<local ip>, 0))" because my multicast listener was bound to a specific adapter. – Mark Foreman Nov 9 '12 at 2:04
  • 2
    for udp multicast you need to bind to multicast group/port not the local group port, sock.bind((MCAST_GRP, MCAST_PORT)), your code might and might not work, it may not work when you have multiple nics – stefanB Jan 21 '13 at 22:22
  • @atikat : Thanks!! Although why do we need this on the MAC but not on Ubuntu ? – Kyuubi Nov 4 '13 at 15:52
  • 2
    @RandallCook: When I replace '' by MCAST_GRP I get socket.error: [Errno 10049] The requested address is not valid in its context – stewbasic Mar 22 '16 at 8:06
17

Multicast sender that broadcasts to a multicast group:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import socket
import struct

def main():
  MCAST_GRP = '224.1.1.1'
  MCAST_PORT = 5007
  sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_DGRAM, socket.IPPROTO_UDP)
  sock.setsockopt(socket.IPPROTO_IP, socket.IP_MULTICAST_TTL, 32)
  sock.sendto('Hello World!', (MCAST_GRP, MCAST_PORT))

if __name__ == '__main__':
  main()

Multicast receiver that reads from a multicast group and prints hex data to the console:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import socket
import binascii

def main():
  MCAST_GRP = '224.1.1.1' 
  MCAST_PORT = 5007
  sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_DGRAM, socket.IPPROTO_UDP)
  try:
    sock.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_REUSEADDR, 1)
  except AttributeError:
    pass
  sock.setsockopt(socket.IPPROTO_IP, socket.IP_MULTICAST_TTL, 32) 
  sock.setsockopt(socket.IPPROTO_IP, socket.IP_MULTICAST_LOOP, 1)

  sock.bind((MCAST_GRP, MCAST_PORT))
  host = socket.gethostbyname(socket.gethostname())
  sock.setsockopt(socket.SOL_IP, socket.IP_MULTICAST_IF, socket.inet_aton(host))
  sock.setsockopt(socket.SOL_IP, socket.IP_ADD_MEMBERSHIP, 
                   socket.inet_aton(MCAST_GRP) + socket.inet_aton(host))

  while 1:
    try:
      data, addr = sock.recvfrom(1024)
    except socket.error, e:
      print 'Expection'
      hexdata = binascii.hexlify(data)
      print 'Data = %s' % hexdata

if __name__ == '__main__':
  main()
  • I tried this, it did not work. In Wireshark I can see the transmit, but I don't see any IGMP join stuff and I don't receive anything. – Gordon Wrigley Nov 25 '09 at 2:46
  • 1
    you need to bind to multicast group/port not local port on multicast address, sock.bind((MCAST_GRP, MCAST_PORT)) – stefanB Jan 21 '13 at 22:24
  • This example doesn't work for me, for an obscure reason. Using socket.gethostbyname(socket.gethostname()) to select the interface doesn't always elect the external interface - in fact, on debian systems, it tends to select the loopback address. Debian adds an entry of 127.0.1.1 in the host table for the hostname. Instead, it is more effective to use socket.INADDR_ANY , which the higher ranking answer uses through the 'pack' statement ( which is more correct than the '+' ). Also, the use of IP_MULTICAST_IF is not required, as the higher ranking answer correctly states. – Brian Bulkowski Jul 13 '16 at 5:50
  • 1
    @BrianBulkowski there are many programmers who use socket.INADDR_ANY, to the great woe and consternation of those of us with multiple interfaces, that need the multicast data to come on a particular interface. The solution is not socket.INADDR_ANY. It is to select the proper interface by IP address, however you think is best (a config file, asking the end user, however you choose for your application's needs). socket.INADDR_ANY will get you the multicast data, true, and is easiest if you a assume a single-homed host, but I think it's less correct. – Mike S Sep 2 '16 at 18:13
  • @MikeS while I agree with you in some principle, the idea of using IP addresses to select interfaces is terribly, terribly fraught. I know the problem well, but in a dynamic world, and IP address isn't the answer. So you need to write code that iterates everything and chooses by interface name, looks at the interface name, picks out the current IP address, and uses that. Hopefully, the IP address hasn't changed in the meantime. I wish that Linux/Unix had standardized on using interface names everywhere, and the programming languages had, that would make a config file more sensible. – Brian Bulkowski Nov 19 '16 at 0:49
11

Better use:

sock.bind((MCAST_GRP, MCAST_PORT))

instead of:

sock.bind(('', MCAST_PORT))

because, if you want to listen to multiple multicast groups on the same port, you'll get all messages on all listeners.

4

In order to Join multicast group Python uses native OS socket interface. Due to portability and stability of Python environment many of socket options are directly forwarded to native socket setsockopt call. Multicast mode of operation such as joining and dropping group membership can be accomplished by setsockopt only.

Basic program for receiving multicast IP packet can look like:

from socket import *

multicast_port  = 55555
multicast_group = "224.1.1.1"
interface_ip    = "10.11.1.43"

s = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM )
s.bind(("", multicast_port ))
mreq = inet_aton(multicast_group) + inet_aton(interface_ip)
s.setsockopt(IPPROTO_IP, IP_ADD_MEMBERSHIP, str(mreq))

while 1:
    print s.recv(1500)

Firstly it creates socket, binds it and triggers triggers multicast group joining by issuing setsockopt. At very end it receives packets forever.

Sending multicast IP frames is straight forward. If you have single NIC in your system sending such packets does not differ from usual UDP frames sending. All you need to take care of is just set correct destination IP address in sendto() method.

I noticed that lot of examples around Internet works by accident in fact. Even on official python documentation. Issue for all of them are using struct.pack incorrectly. Please be advised that typical example uses 4sl as format and it is not aligned with actual OS socket interface structure.

I will try to describe what happen underneath the hood when exercising setsockopt call for python socket object.

Python forwards setsockopt method call to native C socket interface. Linux socket documentation (see man 7 ip) introduces two forms of ip_mreqn structure for IP_ADD_MEMBERSHIP option. Shortest is form is 8 bytes long and longer is 12 bytes long. Above example generates 8 byte setsockopt call where fist for bytes defines multicast_group and second interface_ip.

2

Have a look at py-multicast. Network module can check if an interface supports multicast (on Linux at least).

import multicast
from multicast import network

receiver = multicast.MulticastUDPReceiver ("eth0", "238.0.0.1", 1234 )
data = receiver.read()
receiver.close()

config = network.ifconfig()
print config['eth0'].addresses
# ['10.0.0.1']
print config['eth0'].multicast
#True - eth0 supports multicast
print config['eth0'].up
#True - eth0 is up

Perhaps problems with not seeing IGMP, were caused by an interface not supporting multicast?

1

Just another answer to explain some subtle points in the code of the other answers:

  • socket.INADDR_ANY - this doesn't really bind to all interfaces but just choose one of the local interface
  • Joining a multicast group isn't the same as binding a socket to a local interface address

see What does it mean to bind a multicast (UDP) socket? for more on how multicast works

Multicast receiver:

import socket
import struct
import argparse


def run(groups, port, iface=None, bind_group=None):
    # generally speaking you want to bind to one of the groups you joined in
    # this script,
    # but it is also possible to bind to group which is added by some other
    # programs (like another python program instance of this)

    # assert bind_group in groups + [None], \
    #     'bind group not in groups to join'
    sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_DGRAM, socket.IPPROTO_UDP)

    # allow reuse of socket (to allow another instance of python running this
    # script binding to the same ip/port)
    sock.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_REUSEADDR, 1)

    sock.bind(('' if bind_group is None else bind_group, port))
    for group in groups:
        mreq = struct.pack(
            '4sl' if iface is None else '4s4s',
            socket.inet_aton(group),
            socket.INADDR_ANY if iface is None else socket.inet_aton(iface))

        sock.setsockopt(socket.IPPROTO_IP, socket.IP_ADD_MEMBERSHIP, mreq)

    while True:
        print(sock.recv(10240))


if __name__ == '__main__':
    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
    parser.add_argument('--port', type=int, default=19900)
    parser.add_argument('--join-mcast-groups', default=[], nargs='*',
                        help='multicast groups (ip addrs) to listen to join')
    parser.add_argument(
        '--iface', default=None,
        help='local interface to use for listening to multicast data; '
        'if unspecified, any interface would be chosen')
    parser.add_argument(
        '--bind-group', default=None,
        help='multicast groups (ip addrs) to bind to for the udp socket; '
        'should be one of the multicast groups joined globally '
        '(not necessarily joined in this python program) '
        'in the interface specified by --iface. '
        'If unspecified, bind to 0.0.0.0 '
        '(all addresses (all multicast addresses) of that interface)')
    args = parser.parse_args()
    run(args.join_mcast_groups, args.port, args.iface, args.bind_group)

sample usage: (run the below in two consoles and choose your own --iface (must be same as the interface that receives the multicast data))

python3 multicast_recv.py --iface='192.168.56.102' --join-mcast-groups '224.1.1.1' '224.1.1.2' '224.1.1.3' --bind-group '224.1.1.2'

python3 multicast_recv.py --iface='192.168.56.102' --join-mcast-groups '224.1.1.4'

Multicast sender:

import socket
import argparse


def run(group, port):
    MULTICAST_TTL = 20
    sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_DGRAM, socket.IPPROTO_UDP)
    sock.setsockopt(socket.IPPROTO_IP, socket.IP_MULTICAST_TTL, MULTICAST_TTL)
    sock.sendto(b'from multicast_send.py: ' +
                f'group: {group}, port: {port}'.encode(), (group, port))


if __name__ == '__main__':
    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
    parser.add_argument('--mcast-group', default='224.1.1.1')
    parser.add_argument('--port', default=19900)
    args = parser.parse_args()
    run(args.mcast_group, args.port)

sample usage: # assume the receiver binds to the below multicast group address and that some program requests to join that group. And to simplify the case, assume the receiver and the sender are under the same subnet

python3 multicast_send.py --mcast-group '224.1.1.2'

python3 multicast_send.py --mcast-group '224.1.1.4'

0

To make the client code (from tolomea) work on Solaris you need to pass the ttl value for the IP_MULTICAST_TTL socket option as an unsigned char. Otherwise you will get an error. This worked for me on Solaris 10 and 11:

import socket
import struct

MCAST_GRP = '224.1.1.1'
MCAST_PORT = 5007
ttl = struct.pack('B', 2)

sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_DGRAM, socket.IPPROTO_UDP)
sock.setsockopt(socket.IPPROTO_IP, socket.IP_MULTICAST_TTL, ttl)
sock.sendto("robot", (MCAST_GRP, MCAST_PORT))
-1

tolomea's answer worked for me. I hacked it into socketserver.UDPServer too:

class ThreadedMulticastServer(socketserver.ThreadingMixIn, socketserver.UDPServer):
    def __init__(self, *args):
        super().__init__(*args)
        self.socket = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_DGRAM, socket.IPPROTO_UDP)
        self.socket.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_REUSEADDR, 1)
        self.socket.bind((MCAST_GRP, MCAST_PORT))
        mreq = struct.pack('4sl', socket.inet_aton(MCAST_GRP), socket.INADDR_ANY)
        self.socket.setsockopt(socket.IPPROTO_IP, socket.IP_ADD_MEMBERSHIP, mreq)
-2

Multicast traffic is no different than regular UDP except for the IP address. Take a look at the standard socket library. You may be able to find something that builds on socket and is easier to use.

  • Right. But how about joining a group? I'd like to not roll my own group join management if possible. – NoName Mar 2 '09 at 20:36
  • 9
    Multicast traffic is quite different from regular (unicast) UDP traffic: You need to join the multicast group, all involved switches and routers need to deal with the implications, TTL matters, usually not routed through the WAN. – Johannes Overmann Nov 21 '13 at 11:26

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