8

I am trying to learn to get a better understanding with assembler

Could someone explain what .data, .word and .text means does in the following code??

I don't get what this is for and what it does in this case

   .data
    array:
    .word 0x12121212, 0x23232323, 0x34343434, 0x4, 0x5
    .text
    add_array:
    li x1, 0x10000000
    add x3, x0, x0
    lw x2, 0(x1)
    add x3, x3, x2
    lw x2, 4(x1)
    add x3, x3, x2
    lw x2, 8(x1)
    add x3, x3, x2
    lw x2, 12(x1)
    add x3, x3, x2
    lw x2, 16(x1)
    add x3, x3, x2
2
  • .data signals the start of the data section. .word is 32 bit of memory, in the code 5 of them make up the array named array. Actual code are put into.text section. These are assembler directives.
    – Eraklon
    Feb 25, 2020 at 22:10
  • It should be noted that you can switch between text and data as much as you want. Feb 25, 2020 at 22:11

2 Answers 2

6

.word is essentially creating some space in memory to hold data. Each item following it is 4 bytes long. It's similar to creating an array:

Assembly

array:
.word 0x12121212, 0x23232323, 0x34343434, 0x4, 0x5

C

int array[] = {0x12121212, 0x23232323, 0x34343434, 0x4, 0x5};

.text tells the assembler to switch to the text segment (where code goes), and .data tells the assembler to switch to the data segment (where data goes).

4
  • 2
    More specifically, .data is where non-zero, read-write data goes. Other section names include .rodata (or .rdata on Windows) for read-only data, and .bss for zeroed data. Feb 25, 2020 at 22:24
  • so .word alone is able to hold 4 bytes? And the bytes are now 0x12.... and so on. But why do we need to do this? And how do I know proceed to use this array? Or is this just ok here are 4 bytes for further use? Ah well ok, this .word is named with array how could I use this now in assembly? It's RISC-V btw
    – Rapiz
    Feb 25, 2020 at 22:32
  • I don't see any use of the array in the further code.
    – Rapiz
    Feb 25, 2020 at 22:35
  • What about .global? Jan 4, 2023 at 9:20
2
.data

The .data directive starts series of variable declarations. This is sometimes called a “data segment”.

array:
.word 0x12121212, 0x23232323, 0x34343434, 0x4, 0x5

Here a variable named array is being declared with five elements, each sized to the target CPU's word. A word typically denotes 16 bits (2 bytes) or 32 bits (4 bytes) of memory, depending of the specific CPU's convention. In other words, the .word directive allocates memory.

.text
add_array:

The .text directive starts the actual program code, sometimes called a “text segment” or “code segment”.

Please note different flavors of assembly terminology exist, depending on the CPU family you are working with.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.