9

I'm trying to write generic algorithms in C# that can work with geometric entities of different dimension.

In the following contrived example I have Point2 and Point3, both implementing a simple IPoint interface.

Now I have a function GenericAlgorithm that calls a function GetDim. There are multiple definitions of this function based on the type. There is also a fall-back function that is defined for anything that implements IPoint.

I initially expected the output of the following program to be 2, 3. However, it is 0, 0.

interface IPoint {
    public int NumDims { get; } 
}

public struct Point2 : IPoint {
    public int NumDims => 2;
}

public struct Point3 : IPoint {
    public int NumDims => 3;
}

class Program
{
    static int GetDim<T>(T point) where T: IPoint => 0;
    static int GetDim(Point2 point) => point.NumDims;
    static int GetDim(Point3 point) => point.NumDims;

    static int GenericAlgorithm<T>(T point) where T : IPoint => GetDim(point);

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Point2 p2;
        Point3 p3;
        int d1 = GenericAlgorithm(p2);
        int d2 = GenericAlgorithm(p3);
        Console.WriteLine("{0:d}", d1);        // returns 0 !!
        Console.WriteLine("{0:d}", d2);        // returns 0 !!
    }
}

OK, so for some reason the concrete type information is lost in GenericAlgorithm. I don't fully understand why this happens, but fine. If I can't do it this way, what other alternatives do I have?

5
  • 2
    "There is also a fall-back function " What is the purpose of this, exactly? The whole point of implementing an interface is to guarantee that the NumDims property is available. Why are you ignoring it in some cases?
    – John Wu
    Commented Feb 26, 2020 at 7:59
  • So it compiles, basically. Initially, I thought the fall back function is required if at run-time the JIT compiler can't find a specialized implementation for GetDim (i.e. I pass a Point4 but GetDim<Point4> doesn't exist). However, it doesn't seem the compiler bothers to look for a specialized implementation. Commented Feb 26, 2020 at 8:07
  • 1
    @woggy: You say "it doesn't seem the compiler bothers to look for a specialized implementation" as if this were a matter of laziness on the part of designers and implementers. It's not. It's a matter of how generics are represented in .NET. It's just not the same kind of specialization as templating in C++. A generic method isn't compiled separately for each type argument - it's compiled once. There are pros and cons of this, certainly, but it's not a matter of "bothering".
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Feb 26, 2020 at 8:15
  • @jonskeet Apologies if my language choice was poor, I'm sure there are complexities here that I have not considered. My understanding was the compiler does not compile separate functions for reference types, but it does for value types/structs, is that correct? Commented Feb 26, 2020 at 8:18
  • @woggy: That's the JIT-compiler, which is an entirely separate matter from the C# compiler - and it's the C# compiler that performs overload resolution. The IL for the generic method is only generated once - not once per specialization.
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Feb 26, 2020 at 8:26

4 Answers 4

10

This method:

static int GenericAlgorithm<T>(T point) where T : IPoint => GetDim(point);

... will always call GetDim<T>(T point). The overload resolution is performed at compile-time, and at that stage there's no other applicable method.

If you want overload resolution to be called at execution time, you'd need to use dynamic typing, e.g.

static int GenericAlgorithm<T>(T point) where T : IPoint => GetDim((dynamic) point);

But it's generally a better idea to use inheritance for this - in your example, obviously you could just have the single method and return point.NumDims. I assume in your real code there's some reason the equivalent is trickier to do, but without more context we can't advise on how to use inheritance to perform the specialization. Those are your options though:

  • Inheritance (preferred) for specialization based on the execution-time type of the target
  • Dynamic typing for execution-time overload resolution
3
  • The real situation is I have an AxisAlignedBoundingBox2 and AxisAlignedBoundingBox3. I have a Containsstatic method that is used to determine if a collection of boxes contains a Line2 or Line3 (which one depends on the type of the boxes). The algorithm logic between the two types is exactly the same, except the number of dimensions is different. There are also calls to Intersect internally that need to be specialized to the correct type. I want to avoid virtual function calls/dynamic, which is why I am using generics ...of course, I can just copy/paste the code and move on. Commented Feb 26, 2020 at 8:00
  • 1
    @woggy: It's quite hard to visualize that from just a description. If you want help trying to do this using inheritance, I suggest you create a new question with a minimal but complete example.
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Feb 26, 2020 at 8:13
  • OK, will do, I'll accept this answer for now as it seems I haven't provided a good example. Commented Feb 26, 2020 at 8:15
6

As of C# 8.0 you should be able to provide a default implementation for your interface, rather than requiring the generic method.

interface IPoint {
    int NumDims { get => 0; }
}

Implementing a generic method and overloads per IPoint implementation also violates the Liskov Substitution Principle (the L in SOLID). You would be better to push the algorithm into each IPoint implementation, which means you should only need a single method call:

static int GetDim(IPoint point) => point.NumDims;
3

Visitor Pattern

as an alternative to dynamic usage, you may want to use a Visitor pattern as below:

interface IPoint
{
    public int NumDims { get; }
    public int Accept(IVisitor visitor);
}

public struct Point2 : IPoint
{
    public int NumDims => 2;

    public int Accept(IVisitor visitor)
    {
        return visitor.Visit(this);
    }
}

public struct Point3 : IPoint
{
    public int NumDims => 3;

    public int Accept(IVisitor visitor)
    {
        return visitor.Visit(this);
    }
}

public class Visitor : IVisitor
{
    public int Visit(Point2 toVisit)
    {
        return toVisit.NumDims;
    }

    public int Visit(Point3 toVisit)
    {
        return toVisit.NumDims;
    }
}

public interface IVisitor<T>
{
    int Visit(T toVisit);
}

public interface IVisitor : IVisitor<Point2>, IVisitor<Point3> { }

class Program
{
    static int GetDim<T>(T point) where T : IPoint => 0;
    static int GetDim(Point2 point) => point.NumDims;
    static int GetDim(Point3 point) => point.NumDims;

    static int GenericAlgorithm<T>(T point) where T : IPoint => point.Accept(new Visitor());

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Point2 p2;
        Point3 p3;
        int d1 = GenericAlgorithm(p2);
        int d2 = GenericAlgorithm(p3);
        Console.WriteLine("{0:d}", d1);        // returns 2
        Console.WriteLine("{0:d}", d2);        // returns 3
    }
}
1

Why don't you define GetDim function in class and interface? Actually, you do not need to define GetDim function, just use the property NumDims.

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