I'm trying to get simple encryption/decryption working with AesManaged, but I keep getting an exception when trying to close the decryption stream. The string here gets encrypted and decrypted correctly, and then I get the CryptographicException "Padding was invalid and cannot be removed" after Console.WriteLine prints the correct string.

Any ideas?

MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
byte[] rawPlaintext = Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes("This is annoying!");

using (Aes aes = new AesManaged())
{
  aes.Padding = PaddingMode.PKCS7;
  aes.Key = new byte[128/8];
  aes.IV = new byte[128/8];

  using (CryptoStream cs = new CryptoStream(ms, aes.CreateEncryptor(),
                                            CryptoStreamMode.Write))
  {
    cs.Write(rawPlaintext, 0, rawPlaintext.Length);
    cs.FlushFinalBlock();
  }

  ms = new MemoryStream(ms.GetBuffer());
  using (CryptoStream cs = new CryptoStream(ms, aes.CreateDecryptor(),
                                            CryptoStreamMode.Read))
  {
    byte[] rawData = new byte[rawPlaintext.Length];
    int len = cs.Read(rawData, 0, rawPlaintext.Length);
    string s = Encoding.Unicode.GetString(rawData);
    Console.WriteLine(s);
  }
}
up vote 48 down vote accepted

The trick is to use MemoryStream.ToArray(). I also changed your code so that it uses the CryptoStream to Write, in both encrypting and decrypting. And you don't need to call CryptoStream.FlushFinalBlock() explicitly, because you have it in a using() statement, and that flush will happen on Dispose(). The following works for me.

byte[] rawPlaintext = System.Text.Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes("This is all clear now!");

using (Aes aes = new AesManaged())
{
    aes.Padding = PaddingMode.PKCS7;
    aes.KeySize = 128;          // in bits
    aes.Key = new byte[128/8];  // 16 bytes for 128 bit encryption
    aes.IV = new byte[128/8];   // AES needs a 16-byte IV
    // Should set Key and IV here.  Good approach: derive them from 
    // a password via Cryptography.Rfc2898DeriveBytes 
    byte[] cipherText= null;
    byte[] plainText= null;

    using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
    {
        using (CryptoStream cs = new CryptoStream(ms, aes.CreateEncryptor(), CryptoStreamMode.Write))
        {
            cs.Write(rawPlaintext, 0, rawPlaintext.Length);
        }

        cipherText= ms.ToArray();
    }


    using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
    {
        using (CryptoStream cs = new CryptoStream(ms, aes.CreateDecryptor(), CryptoStreamMode.Write))
        {
            cs.Write(cipherText, 0, cipherText.Length);
        }

        plainText = ms.ToArray();
    }
    string s = System.Text.Encoding.Unicode.GetString(plainText);
    Console.WriteLine(s);
}

Also, I guess you know you will want to explicitly set the Mode of the AesManaged instance, and use System.Security.Cryptography.Rfc2898DeriveBytes to derive the Key and IV from a password and salt.

see also:
- AesManaged

  • 4
    I had the same problem, but using RijndaelManaged (also symmetric) and had no idea what was happening. Turns out that MemoryStream.GetBuffer() was getting an unflushed version of the data, and most of the final blocks of data were null, which was messing with my padding. MemoryStream.ToArray() gets the real array. Many thanks for this solution! – Codesleuth Dec 17 '09 at 15:23
  • This is the best/smallest implementation I have seen so far. – tmanthey May 25 '13 at 9:37
  • 2
    Good call on Dispose. I was calling ms.ToArray() before disposing CryptoStream. Moving that line outside of the using fixed it for me. – cadrell0 Jul 23 '15 at 3:38

This exception can be caused by a mismatch of any one of a number of encryption parameters.

I used the Security.Cryptography.Debug interface to trace all parameters used in the encrypt/decrypt methods.

Finally I found out that my problem was that I set the KeySize property after setting the Key causing the class to regenerate a random key and not using the key that I was initially set up.

  • 4
    My problem was also setting KeySize after setting the key, Thanks! – Neil White Aug 16 '11 at 12:59
  • 2
    +1 Thank you so much, I'd vote you up 100 times if I could. I have spent over a day trying to figure out why I couldn't decrypt properly and it turned out I was setting the key size after the key in the code. – LeopardSkinPillBoxHat Nov 14 '11 at 3:56
  • Thank you, this solved my issue – David Esteves Aug 27 '12 at 13:02
  • This was exactly my issue too! Thanks a lot!!! – Ranhiru Cooray Aug 23 '13 at 9:53
  • Is Security.Cryptography.Debug still up to date? It seems to have had no changes since 2010 – Carl Onager May 12 '15 at 11:14

byte[] rawData = new byte[rawPlaintext.Length];

You need to read the length of the buffer, that probably includes the necessary padding (IIRC, been a few years).

Nobody answered, that actually MemoryStream.GetBuffer returns the allocated buffer, not the real data in this buffer. In this case it returns 256-byte buffer, while it contains only 32 bytes of encrypted data.

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.