6

How one could get an instance of the current (per-request) IServiceScope in a controller? In a service?

The plan is to use it to resolve services that belongs to the same scope.

1
  • ctor(IServiceProvider scope) instead
    – andrew.fox
    Commented May 26, 2021 at 13:28

2 Answers 2

8

get an instance ... in a controller:

  1. There're no need to use IHttpContextAccessor within a Controller. There's already a HttpContext property for you. If you want to access HttpContext, just

    // no need to use IHttpContextAccessor.HttpContext
    var svc = HttpContext.RequestServices.GetService<MyService>();
    
  2. Or as an alternative, inject the IServiceProvider directly:

    public class MyController : Controller
    {
        private IServiceProvider _sp;
        public MyController(IServiceProvider sp)
        {
            this._sp = sp;
        }
    }
    

    and when you want a small scope, you can create it as below:

    public IActionResult MyActoin()
    {
        // create a more small scope
        using (var scope = this._sp.CreateScope())
        {
            var sp = scope.ServiceProvider;
            // now you get the services from this small scope
            var svc1 = sp.GetRequiredService<MyService1>();
            var svc2 = sp.GetRequiredService<MyService2>();
            //...
        }
        return new JsonResult("it works");
    }
    
  3. In particular, if the required service's scope is exactly the Request Scope, just inject them all:

    public class MyController : Controller
    {
        private IServiceProvider _sp;
        private readonly MyService1 _service1;
        private readonly MyService2 _service2;
    
        public MyController(IServiceProvider sp, MyService1 service1, MyService2 service2,...)
        {
            this._sp = sp;
            this._service1 = service1;
            this._service2 = service2;
        }
    
2
  • why do you need to create a more small scope ?.. why not sp.GetRequiredService directly ? Commented Jul 24, 2021 at 14:39
  • You are correct with your answer. My bad oversimplifying the question: originally I intended to mention a deeper dependency tree: a service that is resolved for another service in a controller. So, controller here is mentioned cause I was aware of Asp.NET controllers aren't registered in (root) service provider by default.
    – dbardakov
    Commented Dec 21, 2022 at 18:32
1

One solution is to ask for IHttpContextAccessor contextAccessor in controller's constructor and then resolve the desired services from it:

var svc = contextAccessor.HttpContext.RequestServices.GetService<MyService>();

1
  • is there more elegant way? I'd like to decouple myself from IHttpContextAccessor
    – dbardakov
    Commented Feb 27, 2020 at 12:23

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