14

Say I have a vector of integers:

std::vector<int> indices;
for (int i=0; i<15; i++) indices.push_back(i);

Then I sort it in descending order:

sort(indices.begin(), indices.end(), [](int first, int second) -> bool{return indices[first] > indices[second];})
for (int i=0; i<15; i++) printf("%i\n", indices[i]);

This produces the following:

14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0

Now I want to have the numbers 3, 4, 5, and 6 to be moved to the end, and keep the descending order for them (preferably without having to use sort for the second time). I.e., here is what I want:

14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
2
1
0
6
5
4
3

How should I modify the comparison function of the std::sort to achieve that?

  • 4
    return indices[first] > indices[second] Don't you mean return first < second;? – acraig5075 Feb 28 at 13:16
  • 2
    For a simple descending sort, std::greater from <functional> can be used in place of your lambda. As to your question, writing a more verbose comparator that ensures your values compare the way you want might be the easiest way to do it. – sweenish Feb 28 at 13:20
  • 4
    @acraig5075, in descending order it should be return first > second. – ks1322 Feb 28 at 13:21
  • 1
    @acraig5075 I feel like I'm missing something, or do people not know the difference between ascending and descending? – sweenish Feb 28 at 13:22
  • 3
    Maybe you are looking for std::rotate? – super Feb 28 at 13:24
8

Your comparison function is wrong since the values you get as first and second are the elements of the std::vector. Therefore, there is no need to use them as indices. So, you need to change

return indices[first] > indices[second];

to

return first > second;

Now, regarding the problem you try to solve...

You can leave 3, 4, 5 and 6 out of comparison with other elements and still compare it with each other:

std::sort(
    indices.begin(), indices.end(),
    [](int first, int second) -> bool {
        bool first_special = first >= 3 && first <= 6;
        bool second_special = second >= 3 && second <= 6;
        if (first_special != second_special)
            return second_special;
        else
            return first > second;
    }
);

Demo

  • @NutCracker Yes, I agree it's nicer to have the top criterion first. – Heap Overflow Feb 28 at 13:58
5

Functions from the standard algorithms library like iota, sort, find, rotate and copy would make your life easier. Your example comes down to:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <numeric>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>


int main()
{
  std::vector<int> indices(15);
  std::iota(indices.begin(), indices.end(), 0);
  std::sort(indices.begin(), indices.end(), std::greater<>());

  auto a = std::find(indices.begin(), indices.end(), 6);
  auto b = std::find(indices.begin(), indices.end(), 3);
  std::rotate(a, b + 1, indices.end());

  std::copy(indices.begin(), indices.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, "\n"));
  return 0;
}

Output:

14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
2
1
0
6
5
4
3


@TedLyngmo in the comments makes the good point that it could/should be improved with:

auto a = std::lower_bound(indices.begin(), indices.end(), 6, std::greater<int>{});
auto b = a + 4;
  • auto b = a + 4; is wrong (if you want to keep consistency with the previous snippet). It should be auto b = a + 3; because in the std::rotate you use b + 1 – Biagio Festa Feb 28 at 15:08
3

Solution 1

Straightforward approach with a non-linear comparator.

inline constexpr bool SpecialNumber(const int n) noexcept {
  return n < 7 && 2 < n;
}

void StrangeSortSol1(std::vector<int>* v) {
  std::sort(v->begin(), v->end(), [](const int a, const int b) noexcept {
    const bool aSpecial = SpecialNumber(a);
    const bool bSpecial = SpecialNumber(b);

    if (aSpecial && bSpecial) return b < a;
    if (aSpecial) return false;
    if (bSpecial) return true;
    return b < a;
  });
}

Solution 2

Using std::algorithms (partition)!

inline constexpr bool SpecialNumber(const int n) noexcept {
  return n < 7 && 2 < n;
}

void StrangeSortSol2(std::vector<int>* v) {
  auto pivot = std::partition(v->begin(), v->end(), std::not_fn(SpecialNumber));
  std::sort(v->begin(), pivot, std::greater{});
  std::sort(pivot, v->end(), std::greater{});
}

Performance Considerations

It may look like the second solution is slower because of the overhead of partition. Probably it's not, because of cache and miss-branch prediction in modern processors.

Benchmark

  • Any good compiler should transform n <= 6 && 3 <= n to whatever works best for the target CPU so you gain nothing by introducing the numbers 2 and 7 but potential confusion - and why take a pointer to the vector instead of a reference? – Ted Lyngmo Feb 28 at 14:17
  • Don't use ` const int number` as argument function – Antoine Morrier Feb 28 at 14:36
  • 1
    @AntoineMorrier Why? – Heap Overflow Feb 28 at 14:44
  • @HeapOverflow Because it is the same without using const :). – Antoine Morrier Feb 28 at 17:00
  • @AntoineMorrier I don't think it's the same. Doesn't the const tell the reader that the function doesn't change the value? In this particular case of a one-liner it might be clear, but in general it isn't. – Heap Overflow Feb 28 at 17:06

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