212

What is a good way to find the index of an element in a list in Python?
Note that the list may not be sorted.

Is there a way to specify what comparison operator to use?

2
  • 1
    Can unmark this one as duplicated, the questions and answers don't handle the case of class instances that match a criteria.
    – Caveman
    Jun 22, 2020 at 16:15
  • Also finding the index of an item in a list is not the same thing as finding the item in a list. Feb 5, 2021 at 14:28

10 Answers 10

302

From Dive Into Python:

>>> li
['a', 'b', 'new', 'mpilgrim', 'z', 'example', 'new', 'two', 'elements']
>>> li.index("example")
5
3
  • 18
    But this code gives error when element is not in the list.In current example context if I search for 'three' (i.e: li.index('three')) gives error. May 28, 2014 at 7:31
  • 12
    You can catch the error to detect when something isn't in the list. try: li.index("three") except ValueError: found = false
    – Peter G
    Nov 18, 2016 at 16:06
  • 2
    if you really want to find the index then, first check element in array if True then only do => li.index("example") Dec 4, 2019 at 12:37
172

If you just want to find out if an element is contained in the list or not:

>>> li
['a', 'b', 'new', 'mpilgrim', 'z', 'example', 'new', 'two', 'elements']
>>> 'example' in li
True
>>> 'damn' in li
False
0
69

The best way is probably to use the list method .index.

For the objects in the list, you can do something like:

def __eq__(self, other):
    return self.Value == other.Value

with any special processing you need.

You can also use a for/in statement with enumerate(arr)

Example of finding the index of an item that has value > 100.

for index, item in enumerate(arr):
    if item > 100:
        return index, item

Source

51

Here is another way using list comprehension (some people might find it debatable). It is very approachable for simple tests, e.g. comparisons on object attributes (which I need a lot):

el = [x for x in mylist if x.attr == "foo"][0]

Of course this assumes the existence (and, actually, uniqueness) of a suitable element in the list.

3
  • 10
    el = [x for x in mylist if x.attr == "foo"] if el: do something with el[0] solves the "existence" problem
    – berkus
    Jul 30, 2015 at 16:33
  • 7
    el = next((x for x in mylist if x.attr == "foo"), None) if you want to receive a value even when doesn't exist
    – thiagola92
    Feb 8, 2021 at 12:13
  • 1
    [*[label_set for label_set in prediction_label_sets if x == 3], None][0] If you want it to fallback to none, without using an iterator. Not sure if it's simpler or harder.
    – Sebastian
    Jan 26 at 9:47
19

assuming you want to find a value in a numpy array, I guess something like this might work:

Numpy.where(arr=="value")[0]
2
  • 1
    doesn't work for multidimensional arrays if you're looking for a specific row, e.g. arr = np.array([[0,0,1],[0,1,0],[1,0,0]]) if you do np.where(arr == [0,1,0]) it doesn't give the right result
    – ierdna
    Aug 21, 2018 at 22:11
  • @ierdna, don't you need to supply axis=0 or axis=1? Sep 28, 2019 at 8:17
8

There is the index method, i = array.index(value), but I don't think you can specify a custom comparison operator. It wouldn't be hard to write your own function to do so, though:

def custom_index(array, compare_function):
    for i, v in enumerate(array):
        if compare_function(v):
            return i
6

I use function for returning index for the matching element (Python 2.6):

def index(l, f):
     return next((i for i in xrange(len(l)) if f(l[i])), None)

Then use it via lambda function for retrieving needed element by any required equation e.g. by using element name.

element = mylist[index(mylist, lambda item: item["name"] == "my name")]

If i need to use it in several places in my code i just define specific find function e.g. for finding element by name:

def find_name(l, name):
     return l[index(l, lambda item: item["name"] == name)]

And then it is quite easy and readable:

element = find_name(mylist,"my name")
4

The index method of a list will do this for you. If you want to guarantee order, sort the list first using sorted(). Sorted accepts a cmp or key parameter to dictate how the sorting will happen:

a = [5, 4, 3]
print sorted(a).index(5)

Or:

a = ['one', 'aardvark', 'a']
print sorted(a, key=len).index('a')
2

how's this one?

def global_index(lst, test):
    return ( pair[0] for pair in zip(range(len(lst)), lst) if test(pair[1]) )

Usage:

>>> global_index([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6], lambda x: x>3)
<generator object <genexpr> at ...>
>>> list(_)
[3, 4, 5]
2
  • 3
    Get pythonic: def global_index(lst, test): return (idx for idx, val in enumerate(lst) if test(val) )
    – recursive
    Mar 3, 2009 at 4:01
  • 6
    filter(lambda x: x>3, [1,2,3,4,5,6])
    – John Fouhy
    Mar 3, 2009 at 21:15
2

I found this by adapting some tutos. Thanks to google, and to all of you ;)

def findall(L, test):
    i=0
    indices = []
    while(True):
        try:
            # next value in list passing the test
            nextvalue = filter(test, L[i:])[0]

            # add index of this value in the index list,
            # by searching the value in L[i:] 
            indices.append(L.index(nextvalue, i))

            # iterate i, that is the next index from where to search
            i=indices[-1]+1
        #when there is no further "good value", filter returns [],
        # hence there is an out of range exeption
        except IndexError:
            return indices

A very simple use:

a = [0,0,2,1]
ind = findall(a, lambda x:x>0))

[2, 3]

P.S. scuse my english

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