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Having a file.py which has three versions in git with three unique commit hashes.

So how can I programmatically restore all of the versions into specific files, such as:

0_<git_hash>_file.py
1_<git_hash>_file.py
2_<git_hash>_file.py

Solution does not have to be Python, but looking into the Python git package currently.

  • When you pull the branch you pull all of its history with it. Doing what you want should be as simple as git checkout <git_hash> -- file1.py. However I don't think git was designed to work back and forth like this. Is there a reason you can't create 3 branches v1/v2/v3 and switch between them? Or use a master file.py to swtich between file1/2/3 on some condition? Are other files being changed around this one? – Michael Mar 1 at 22:27
2
0
n=0
git log --pretty= --diff-filter=d --raw -- $file | 
while read m1 m2 h1 h2 rest; do
        eval git show $h2 > $((n++))_${h2}.$file
done

or

n=0
git log --pretty=%h --diff-filter=d -- $file |
while read; do
        eval git show $REPLY:$file > $((n++))_$REPLY.$file
done

depending on whether you want the blob's or the commit's hash in the resulting file name.

| improve this answer | |
  • What are the evals for? – John Kugelman Mar 2 at 0:05
  • @JohnKugelman To get the redirection reevaluated each time, I tried it without that and all the number prefixes came up zero. – jthill Mar 2 at 0:06
  • This actually works, but it would be great to add some subfolder in the script. After execution: ls -lh | wc -l 767 ;) – gies0r Mar 2 at 10:15
  • 1
    Stick a mkdir -p content-dumps and prefix the redirects with content-dumps/. The eval imho shouldn't be necessary, it's a sledgehammer swatting what looks like a bug to me, split the bump in a separate stmt instead, redirto=content-dumps/$((n++))_$h2.$file; git show $h2 > $redirto. – jthill Mar 2 at 13:24
0
0

You can get a specified version of a file without checking out the corresponding commit using git show. For example:

git show git_hash:./file.py

will print the contents of file.py as of the specified commit to standard output. (Presumably the Git Python interface, which I haven't used, provides similar functionality.) The leading ./ avoids path resolution problems in some cases (I don't remember the details).

I've written a Perl script that does this kind of thing for several different version control systems (most of which I no longer use): https://github.com/Keith-S-Thompson/get-versions (no warranties).

As requested, here's an example of running get-versions on a copy of its own repo:

$ ls -l
total 56
-rw-r--r-- 1 kst kst 18092 Aug  9  2015 COPYING
-rw-r--r-- 1 kst kst  6234 Apr 16  2018 README.md
-rw-r--r-- 1 kst kst   940 Apr 25  2018 TODO.md
-rwxr-xr-x 1 kst kst 20977 Apr 16  2018 get-versions
$ get-versions -pad 3 -last 3 get-versions 
$ ls -l
total 128
-rw-r--r-- 1 kst kst 18092 Aug  9  2015 COPYING
-rw-r--r-- 1 kst kst  6234 Apr 16  2018 README.md
-rw-r--r-- 1 kst kst   940 Apr 25  2018 TODO.md
-rwxr-xr-x 1 kst kst 20977 Apr 16  2018 get-versions
-r--r--r-- 1 kst kst 20752 Mar  2 10:54 get-versions,012
-r--r--r-- 1 kst kst 20766 Mar  2 10:54 get-versions,013
-r--r--r-- 1 kst kst 20977 Mar  2 10:54 get-versions,014
$ 

get-versions -help prints an entirely too verbose usage message. (Adding a man page is on my TODO list, as is preserving execute permissions.)

| improve this answer | |
  • That collection looks promissing towards compability. Sadly, I am absolutly no friend of Perl, but would give it a try. Could you enrich your answer with an easy example on how to use it for the question stated here? – gies0r Mar 2 at 10:18
0
0

Use git rev-list to get the list of commits, and git show to output the file:

i=0; git rev-list --abbrev-commit HEAD | 
while read sha; do
    git show $sha:./file.py > $((i++))_${sha}_file.py
done

This version might avoid problems with i++ being executed in a subshell and not affecting the parent:

i=0; git rev-list --abbrev-commit HEAD |
while read sha; do
    git show $sha:./file.py > ${i}_${sha}_file.py
    ((i++))
done
| improve this answer | |
  • This is quiet close, but outputs 0_<git_hash>_file.py 0_<git_hash>_file.py 0_<git_hash>_file.py The files are filled but with some So it looks like the counter is not working. Furthermore, there are some fatals fatal: Path 'file.py' exists on disk, but not in 'c6xxxx. But that looks ok. – gies0r Mar 2 at 10:09
  • Increment works in bash 5.0.11. There are plenty of ways to implement a counter. git rev-list ... | while read s; do i=$(expr $i + 1); ... ; done should work even in the oldest. – William Pursell Mar 2 at 13:54
  • While playing with your command, I tried replacing git show ... with echo git show ... to get a better idea of what's going on, and ran into a bash bug. Your command (with the file name file.py changed to the name of a file that's in my repo) failed, treating i as 0 on each iteration. Changing git ... to echo git ... gave me correct file names. Then changing echo to /bin/echo gave me all 0s again. Apparently there's a bash bug involving builtin echo vs. external /bin/echo, probably affecting the scope of $i. Doing ((i++)) as a separate command works around the bug. – Keith Thompson Mar 2 at 19:39
  • Bug report and response. "It's not a bug. That expansion is performed as part of a redirection; redirections are performed in subshells when the simple command they affect is run in a subshell." -- Chet Ramey – Keith Thompson Mar 2 at 21:09
  • @WilliamPursell Does the code in your answer work for you? I'd expect it to fail because $((i++)) will refer to $i in a subshell. If you can't verify that it works, I suggest modifying the code to place ((i++)) as a separate statement. (BTW, I'm not convinced that bash's behavior is not a bug. It's at least unpleasant that builtin echo vs. external /bin/echo changes the behavior.) – Keith Thompson Mar 2 at 23:08

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