2

I'm working on a project for myself and I've been having an issue with passing a hash to a subroutine. There's several subroutines actually but I tried to strip it down to the bare minimum. I realize that the %mdc is a global hash so I don't have to pass it around to all of the subroutines I have but I'd prefer it that way out of habit. While the below snippet does work it feels like it could be cleaner.

Anyway, the part that's got my thinking that there must be a better way are the lines:

%mdc_def = mysub(\%mdc);
%mdc = %$mdc_def;

It feels... klunky to me but I'm not finding a way to make those two lines be just one... something like (even though it's bad syntax):

%mdc = %mysub(\%mdc);

Then if I should have a mysub2 that would also need that hash I'd have to do the same two line shuffle in that subroutine as well. It just feels messy.

Here's the snippet that I'm working on:

use strict;
use warnings;

my %mdc = ();
my $mdc_def;

$mdc{abc} = 123;
$mdc{cde} = 234;

foreach (sort keys (%mdc)) { print "before $_ = $mdc{$_}\n"; }
$mdc_def = mysub(\%mdc);
%mdc = %$mdc_def;
foreach (sort keys (%mdc)) { print " after $_ = $mdc{$_}\n"; }

sub mysub {
  my ($mdc_def) = @_;
  my %m = %$mdc_def;

  $m{def} = 345;
  $m{efg} = 456; 

  return \%m;
}

Thanks in advance.

5

You could use the following:

sub mysub {
   my ($mdc_def) = @_;
   my %m = %$mdc_def;

   $m{def} = 345;
   $m{efg} = 456; 

   return \%m;
}

my %mdc = ( a=>1, b=>2 );

%mdc = %{ mysub(\%mdc) };

But that makes not one by two copies of hashes and all the scalars within. There's no reason for the global var to be a hash instead of scalar, which would avoid one of the instances of copying.

sub mysub {
   my ($mdc_def) = @_;
   my %m = %$mdc_def;

   $m{def} = 345;
   $m{efg} = 456; 

   return \%m;
}

my $mdc = { a=>1, b=>2 };

$mdc = mysub(\%mdc);

That leaves one instance of copying. That instance is needed if you don't want mysub to modify the hash in-place, so the above code is fine.

The following a version that modidies the hash in-place, avoiding the second instance of copying (and allowing us to leave the global var as a hash).

sub mysub_inplace {
   my ($mdc_def) = @_;
   $mdc_def->{def} = 345;
   $mdc_def->{efg} = 456; 
}

my %mdc = ( a=>1, b=>2 );

mysub_inplace(\%mdc);
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1

Try

%mdc = %{mysub(\%mdc)};
  • \%mdc will pass reference to %mdc hash as parameter to mysub suroutine
  • %{ mysub(…)} will treat return value of mysub call as hash reference and convert it to hash

You may use subroutine prototype sub mysub (\%) to call mysub with mysub(%mdc)


Simple working example/script:

#!/usr/bin/perl
# Original version constained prototypes for sub mysub - 
# see ikegami comments below the answear
use strict;
use warnings;

sub mysub {
  my( $hRef ) = (@_);
  $hRef->{a} = 0;
  $hRef->{c} = 3;
  return $hRef;
}

my %mdc = ( a=>1, b=>2);

%mdc = %{mysub(\%mdc)};
print %mdc;
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  • 2
    Please avoid prototypes. They cause more problems than anything. – ikegami Mar 2 at 1:41
  • @ikegami Could you be more specific? [links!] I hardly use them in my small scripts but they seem like a good idea in bigger scripts. – AnFi Mar 2 at 2:25
  • 3
    Most people use them to validate, but they actually change the parsing rules. You used one to make the sub magical for no reason. Needless magic is bad by definition. Code shouldn't look like it's doing one thing when it does another, especially for no reason. e.g. If you want a specific example, %foo is normally safe from being changed in f(%foo) because that normally passes the keys and values. But the prototype you used changes that. Suddenly, f is able to change %foo. – ikegami Mar 2 at 2:29
  • 2
    In short, surprises are bad, and prototypes cause surprise. (& being an exception.) They are widely shunned. – ikegami Mar 2 at 2:32
  • 3
    Oh, that's assuming they even work. Most of the time, they don't even work. They don't work for method calls, and they don't work when a sub is called via a reference. They also don't work if you put code in the wrong order. You could have two identical calls to a sub and only of them works. It's a real mess. – ikegami Mar 2 at 2:34
0

Do you possess an understanding what is $hash_ref = \%hash and how to use it?

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature 'say';

my %mdc = ();

$mdc{abc} = 123;
$mdc{cde} = 234;

say '- Before ------------';

while( my($k,$v) = each %mdc ) {
    say "$k => $v";
}

mysub(\%mdc);

say '- After -------------';

while( my($k,$v) = each %mdc ) {
    say "$k => $v";
}

sub mysub {
  my $mdc_ref = shift;

  $mdc_ref->{def} = 345;
  $mdc_ref->{efg} = 456; 
}

Output

- Before ------------
cde => 234
abc => 123
- After -------------
def => 345
cde => 234
abc => 123
efg => 456
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