0

supposed I have these hashes:

my $hash1 = {
  firstname => 'john',
  lastname => 'doe',
};

my $hash2_nested = {
  name => {
    firstname => 'jean',
    lastname => 'doe',
  }
};

Note: hashes can be nested x times deeply.

I want to use Data::Dumper where I can print the copy of those hashes, but with hidden lastname. means, it should print out:

$VAR1 = {
           'firstname' => 'john'
           'lastname' => '***',
        };
and this:
$VAR1 = {
          'name' => {
                      'firstname' => 'john'
                      'lastname' => '***',
                    }
        };

is there any Perl library where it search for a hash key recursively and replace its value dynamically? something like:

replace_hash_value($hash1, 'lastname', '***');
3
  • Do you want to change the data structure, or do you want to only filter this in Data::Dumper output? – simbabque Mar 2 '20 at 16:31
  • 1
    If you are looking to change the hash, you could use Data::Walk – Grinnz Mar 2 '20 at 17:06
  • I don't recommend that substitution. Trying to figure out if a ' is data or structure is not trivial! – brian d foy Mar 2 '20 at 21:07
1

There are several things to consider here. Mostly, you don't want to reinvent what is already out there. Also remember that any Personal Identifying Information (PII) in your program has a way to leak out despite your best efforts, but that's not the programming question at hand.

First, you don't want to operate on the original data, and since you have nested structures, you can't simply make a copy because that only copies the top level and still shares references at the lower level:

 my %copy = %original;  # shallow copy!

But, the core module Storable can make a deep copy that is completely disconnected, new copy that shares no references:

 use Storable qw(dclone);
 my $deep_copy = dclone $hash1;

Now you can play with $deep_copy without changing $hash1. You want to find all the last_name keys and remove their value. Grinnz suggested the Data::Walk module (an example of the Visitor design pattern). It's like File::Find for data structures. It's going to handle all the business of finding the hashes for you. In your wanted subroutine, skip everything that's not interesting, then change the nodes that are interesting. You don't worry about how you find or are given the nodes:

use Data::Walk;

walk \&wanted, $deep_copy;

sub wanted {
    return unless ref $_ eq ref {};
    return unless exists $_->{last_name};

    $_->{last_name} = '****';
    }

Now, put that all together. Here's a mix of nested things, with some odd cases thrown in, including an object that uses a hash:

use v5.10;

use Hash::AsObject;
my $data = {
    first_name => 'Amelia',
    last_name => 'Camel',


    friends => [
        q(last_name => 'REDACTED BY POLICY'),
        {
        first_name => 'Camelia',
        last_name => 'Butterfly',
        },
        {
        first_name => 'Larry',
        last_name => 'Llama',
        associate => {
            first_name => 'Vicky',
            last_name => 'Vicuna',
            }
        },
        ],

    name => {
        first_name => 'Andy',
        last_name => 'Alpaca',
        },

    object => bless {
        first_name => 'Peter',
        last_name => 'Python',
        }, 'FooBar',
    };

use Storable qw(dclone);
my $deep_copy = dclone( $data );

use Data::Walk;

walk \&wanted, $deep_copy;

use Data::Dumper;
say Dumper( $deep_copy );

sub wanted {
    return unless ref $_ eq ref {};
    return unless exists $_->{last_name};

    $_->{last_name} = '****';
    }

And, here's the output from Data::Dumper (which you can prettify with some of its settings):

$VAR1 = {
          'object' => bless( {
                               'first_name' => 'Peter',
                               'last_name' => 'Python'
                             }, 'Hash::AsObject' ),
          'first_name' => 'Amelia',
          'last_name' => '****',
          'friends' => [
                         'last_name => \'REDACTED BY POLICY\'',
                         {
                           'last_name' => '****',
                           'first_name' => 'Camelia'
                         },
                         {
                           'last_name' => '****',
                           'first_name' => 'Larry',
                           'associate' => {
                                            'first_name' => 'Vicky',
                                            'last_name' => '****'
                                          }
                         }
                       ],
          'name' => {
                      'first_name' => 'Andy',
                      'last_name' => '****'
                    }
        };

Notice that it finds the hashes in the array reference, it doesn't touch the object, and it doesn't touch the literal data that has last_name => in it.

If you don't like those behaviors, then you can modify what you do in wanted to account for what you'd like to happen. Suppose you want to look at certain objects too, like that Hash::AsObject object. One (polymorphic) way to do that is look for objects that let you call a last_name method (although this assumes you can give it an argument to change the last name):

sub wanted {
    if( ref $_ eq ref {} and exists $_->{last_name} ) {
        $_->{last_name} = '****';
        }
    # merely one way to do this
    elsif( eval { $_->can('last_name') } ) {
        $_->last_name( '****' );
        }
    }

Now the last_name member in the object is also redacted:

$VAR1 = {
          'first_name' => 'Amelia',
          'friends' => [
                         'last_name => \'REDACTED BY POLICY\'',
                         {
                           'last_name' => '****',
                           'first_name' => 'Camelia'
                         },
                         {
                           'first_name' => 'Larry',
                           'associate' => {
                                            'first_name' => 'Vicky',
                                            'last_name' => '****'
                                          },
                           'last_name' => '****'
                         }
                       ],
          'last_name' => '****',
          'name' => {
                      'first_name' => 'Andy',
                      'last_name' => '****'
                    },
          'object' => bless( {
                               'first_name' => 'Peter',
                               'last_name' => '****'
                             }, 'Hash::AsObject' )
        };

That wanted is as flexible as you'd like it to be, and it's pretty simple.

-1

Why not to code such subroutine yourself?

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature 'say';

my $hash1 = {
    firstname => 'john',
    lastname => 'doe'
};

my $hash2_nested = {
    name => {
        firstname => 'jean',
        lastname => 'doe'
    }
};

my $mask = 'lastname';

hash_mask($hash1,$mask);
hash_mask($hash2_nested,$mask);

sub hash_mask {
    say "\$VAR = {";
    hash_mask_x(shift, shift, 1);
    say "};";
}

sub hash_mask_x {
    my $hash   = shift;
    my $mask_k = shift;
    my $depth  = shift;

    my $indent = ' ' x 8;
    my $space  = $indent x $depth;

    while( my($k,$v) = each %{$hash} ) {
        if (ref $v eq 'HASH') {
            say $space . "$k => {";
            hash_mask_x($v,$mask_k,$depth+1);
            say $space . "}";
        } elsif( $k eq $mask_k ) {
            say $space . "'$k' => '*****'";
        } else {
            say $space . "'$k' => '$v'";
        }
    }
}

Output

$VAR = {
        'lastname' => '*****'
        'firstname' => 'john'
};
$VAR = {
        name => {
                'lastname' => '*****'
                'firstname' => 'jean'
        }
};
7
  • Now handle all of the other cases, recursively! – brian d foy Mar 2 '20 at 19:20
  • @brain d foy -- same way as in this case with hash, all what is required to add is `if (ref $v eq 'ARRAY') { ... }'. It is much easier than it looks at first sight. I demonstrated how it can be done with provided sample of data. – Polar Bear Mar 2 '20 at 19:32
  • 1
    Having written a couple of these, it's not that easy. You now have to look through the array for hashes (and so on). And, what if ref returns a package name instead of a Perl variable type? And, and, and... Remember that people often show minimal cases that represent a fraction of their problem, so something that only works on the sample data is often not actually helpful. It needs to be flexible for the complexity they haven't show. – brian d foy Mar 2 '20 at 19:34
  • @brain d foy -- jhnc demonstrated other elegant way to modify Dumper output, although it is more expensive on CPU cycles (but who cares nowadays as most computers do not used to full CPU potential anyway). – Polar Bear Mar 2 '20 at 19:36
  • Well, running a substitution on the stringification of a serialization has it's own hazards since you can't distinguish structure and data. – brian d foy Mar 2 '20 at 19:37

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