0

Given 2 numbers M and N Where M is square tiles of size 1x1 and N is Square tiles of size 2x2 return the length of the side of the largest square you can create. if no square can be created return 0

Example M=4, N=3 return 4

enter image description here

Example2 M=13, N=3 return 5

enter image description here

Example3 M=0, N=18 return 8, use 16 tiles 2x2 to create the square, Note that not all tiles are used.

I solved some cases using

return math.floor(math.sqrt(M+(4*N)))

but didn't work for other cases

  • This seems more like a geometry / math question than a coding question. Only once you know the math behind calculating this value can you then implement a decent code solution that will be generalised for any number of m and n values – Chris Doyle Mar 4 at 12:44
  • You still don't want to tell us what other cases didn't work? – Heap Overflow Mar 4 at 12:47
  • 1
    @HeapOverflow for example N = 2, M = 1 – Alex Mar 4 at 12:50
  • These are sometimes called Tiling problems. They can also also be solved using Mathematical Programming techniques. – Erwin Kalvelagen Mar 6 at 9:19
2

I am sure someone will be able to refactor and clean up this code but the problem interested me enough to try to solve it before I went out for a run. I am looking forward to some comments on how to clean it up but based on the 3 examples given and the expected answers this code seems to work.

The idea is you convert the small tiles into as many large tiles as possible. you then work out whats the biggest square you can make form the total large tiles(large and converted small). Once you know this you work out how many of the total large tiles you didn't use and where possible convert these back to small tile.

The key here is if you have more spare large tiles than you did from small tiles you give all the small tiles back as you didn't need them. If you have less spare tiles than you got from small tiles then you give back all the spares you didn't use as small tiles.

Now we have worked out the largest square we can make from n's we will use the remaining m's to extend the square. So to calculate how many m's we need we work out the longest length of the square and multiply it by 2 and add 1 for the corner piece.

we now just loop while we have more m's than we need to extend the square. each time we subtract those m's from the available m's increase the longest length and calculate how many we need to extend again.

UPDATE - Code refactored to make it more readable

import math
from typing import Tuple


def largest_square_num(number: int) -> int:
    while number > 1:
        sqrt = math.sqrt(number)
        if sqrt == int(sqrt):
            break
        else:
            number -= 1
    return number


def convert_m_to_n(m: int) -> Tuple[int, int]:
    n_from_m = m // 4
    m_after_n = m % 4
    return n_from_m, m_after_n


def convert_n_to_m_limit(n: int, limit: int) -> int:
    if n > limit:
        m = limit * 4
    else:
        m = n * 4
    return m


def calulate_largest_side_of_square(m, n):
    # build as many n's from m's and store the new n's and remaining m's
    n_from_m, m_after_n = convert_m_to_n(m)
    total_n = n + n_from_m

    # calculate the largest square that can be made from total n's
    largest_square_of_n = largest_square_num(total_n)
    longest_length = math.sqrt(largest_square_of_n) * 2

    # restore m's back from spare n's but not more than we took from m's
    restored_m = convert_n_to_m_limit(total_n - largest_square_of_n, n_from_m)
    total_m = restored_m + m_after_n

    # now we have the biggest n square extent it while we have enough m's
    while True:
        m_needed_to_extend = longest_length * 2 + 1
        if total_m < m_needed_to_extend:
            break
        total_m -= m_needed_to_extend
        longest_length += 1
    return int(longest_length)


tests = [(4, 3), (13, 3), (1, 2), (9, 1), (0, 0), (5, 1)]
for n, m in tests:
    print(f"{m=}, {n=}, longest_side={calulate_largest_side_of_square(n, m)}")

OUTPUT

m=3, n=4, longest_side=4
m=3, n=13, longest_side=5
m=2, n=1, longest_side=2
m=1, n=9, longest_side=3
m=0, n=0, longest_side=0
m=5, n=1, longest_side=3
|improve this answer|||||
1

N = 4 with M = 5 wont work even though the total area is 25. To make this work all numbers need to be square numbers (4,9,16,... (NOT 1)). You'll have to write something that can check if by transferring 4M to be N can make both into the afformentioned square numbers. I'll edit this when I've coded it.


import math

def squareSize(M,N):
    squares =[0,4,9,16,25,36,49,64,81,100]

    if M in squares:
        if N in squares:
            print(1)
            return math.sqrt(M+(4*N))
    if N in squares:
        if M not in squares:
            print(2)
            return(0)
    if M in squares:
        if N not in squares:
            print(3)
            while (M >= 5):
                M = M - 4
                N = N + 1
                if M in squares:
                    if N in squares:
                        return math.sqrt(M+(4*N))
                break
            if M == 1:
                print(1)
                return(0)
            if M == 2:
                print(2)
                return(0)
            if M == 3:
                print(3)
                return(0)    
            if M == 4:
                if N in squares:
                    return math.sqrt(M+(4*N))
                else:
                    M = 0
                    N = N + 1
                    if N in squares:
                        return math.sqrt(M+(4*N))
                    else:
                        return(0)

    if M not in squares:
        if N not in squares:
            print(4)
            while (M >= 5):
                M = M - 4
                N = N + 1
                if M in squares:
                    if N in squares:
                        return math.sqrt(M+(4*N))
                break
            if M == 1 or 2 or 3:
                return(0)
            if M == 4 or 0:
                if N in squares:
                    return math.sqrt(M+(4*N))

This will tell you whether or not you can create a square with all avalible pieces.

I've just realised you also want if a smaller one can be created not using all the pieces - just add a loop that goes through the program checking with smaller M&N combinations until you find one, hope this helps.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    It's not true that N, M must be square numbers. – Alex Mar 4 at 12:58
  • for M=4, N=5 the larges square you can make will be side length 4. since you can use all 4 of the N's making a 2x2 square of Ns where each n have side length 2 giving total length 4 – Chris Doyle Mar 4 at 12:59
  • Meant that the other way around my bad, M=5 N=4. Alex I've kind of poorly explained it there, but if you look at the first example he gave that worked, you'd have to code it to realise that M = 0 and N=4. I've tried a bunch of examples and all of them lead into a square number, Do you know of one that doesnt? – Alec Mar 4 at 13:10
  • squareSize(5, 1) prints 4 and return 0. Neither is the correct answer, which is 3. – Alex Mar 4 at 14:00
1

I think This should work. I tried it on some test cases and it returns the desired result

    import math
    def is_perfect_square(N):
        return math.sqrt(N)%1==0
    def get_side_for_perfect_square(N,M):
        '''
       if N is perfect square we can create exact square of side s=2*sqrt(N)
       using just N . the number of M s needed in oreder to get
       a square with s+i side is then qualculated as 2*(s+i)+1
       '''
       i=0
       side=0

       if N==0:
          if is_perfect_square(M):
              side=math.sqrt(M)
       elif M==0:
           side=math.sqrt(N*4)
       else:
           while M>0:
              M-=2*(math.sqrt(N*4)+i)+1
              if M==0:
                  side=math.sqrt(N*4)+i+1
                  break
              i+=1
       return side
    def size_of_square(N,M):
        perfect_square=is_perfect_square(N)
        side=0
        if not perfect_square:
            '''
            if N is not perfect square we have to find the next perfect square
            that can be created using just N and then the number of M needed to
            create that next perfect square is calculate by finding the
            difference between N and next perfect square. 
            after that if there is M remaining we should analyze it 
            with get_side_for_perfect_square(new_N,new_M) function where 
            new_N and new_M are the corresponding values after the above
            calculation
            '''
            tiles_in_N=4*N
            next_square=(int(math.sqrt(N))+1)**2
            tiles_next_square=next_square*4
            empty_space=tiles_next_square - tiles_in_N
            M-=empty_space
            if M==0:
                side=2*math.sqrt(next_square)
            elif M>0:
                side=get_side_for_perfect_square(next_square,M)
        else:
            side=get_side_for_perfect_square(N,M)
        return int(side)
|improve this answer|||||
1

This is sometimes called tiling. An alternative method to attack this is to formulate a mathematical optimization model and then use an off-the-shelf solver. Not sure if this is of interest to you, but I mention it for completeness.

Here is a more complex example. Consider the inventory of tiles:

----     29 PARAMETER input  inventory data

            count       width        area

tile1           6           1           1
tile2           5           2           4
tile3           4           3           9
tile4           3           4          16
tile5           2           5          25
tile6           1           6          36
total          21                     196

Somewhat surprisingly, for this example we can use all tiles (most of the time this is not the case):

enter image description here

I used a Mixed Integer Programming formulation and used standard off-the-shelf solvers to solve it. The model is a bit too long and complex to reproduce here. For a detailed description see link.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Thanks for this solution. Can not we solve it without extra libraries with Dynamic programming for example? – Ibrahim Selim Mar 11 at 9:30
  • Sorry, I don't know the answer to that question. DP algorithms are very different compared to MIP models, so the MIP strategies I showed do not tell you much at all about whether a DP algorithm is easy or even doable. – Erwin Kalvelagen Mar 11 at 12:10

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.