4

I am trying (and failing) to understand the purpose of the Generic Repository Pattern in the specific instance where it is wrapped around Entity Framework or EF Core.

what is the benefit of writing this:

public void Update(T obj)
{
    DbContext.Set<T>().Attach(obj);
    DbContext.Entry(obj).State = EntityState.Modified;
    DbContext.SaveChanges();
}

When you get the same and more by simply writing it as

public void Update(Movie obj)
{
    DbContext.Set<Movie>().Attach(obj);
    DbContext.Entry(obj).State = EntityState.Modified;
    DbContext.SaveChanges();
}

or

public void Update(Movie obj)
{
    var movie = DbContext.Movies.FirsOrDefault(x => x.MovieId == obj.MovieId);
    DbContext.Entry(movie).CurrentValues.SetValues(obj);
    DbContext.SaveChanges();
}

I guess my real question is why do we wrap a generic repo around what is basically already a generic repository (with more features and optimisations)?

15
  • 2
    None - it's an antipattern for all ORMs, not just EF Core. For example that Update can perform 3 deletions and 5 insertsion along with 15 updates on unrelated objects too. Mar 6, 2020 at 13:25
  • 2
    You do that when you want to abstract things or when the implementation might change (e.g. using something other than EF), especially in a DDD context. Although I'll have to agree that it almost serves no purpose...
    – Haytam
    Mar 6, 2020 at 13:26
  • 3
    I keep posting links to Gunnar Peipman's No need for repositories and unit of work with Entity Framework Core so I don't have to write the same stuff every time. Mar 6, 2020 at 13:26
  • 1
    @Haytam that's what DbSet and DbContext are about. The Generic Repository comes from a time before ORNs Mar 6, 2020 at 13:26
  • 1
    @Haytam with ORMs, there's no need for a generic repository. All those methods are already available by the ORM itself. Abstracting things requires specialized repositories, that could abstract the multiple ORM operations that may be needed to serve a business operation Mar 6, 2020 at 13:28

1 Answer 1

2

Without being too presumptuous, I would like to answer my own question based off of the comment thread.

The generic repository pattern is a hold-over from the days before the era of Object-Relational Mappers (ORM's) like Entity Framework, xHibernate, Dapper, PetaPoco and a million others.

With the advent of the ORM, all the features found in the Repository Pattern are encapsulated within the ORM itself.

For instance, Entity Framework by default uses a Transaction/UnitOfWork each time you call .SaveChanges() on the DbContext.

It also automatically tracks changes made to entities returned by a query unless you explicitly tell it not to with UseQueryTrackingBehavior(QueryTrackingBehavior.NoTracking).

As far as Generic Repositories are concerned, what do you think the following code is:

MyDbContext.Set<WeatherForecast>().Add(forecast);

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