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I was wondering if it is possible to access a local variable from another class in Java. I have tried to do it in the below code, however, it is giving an error. Please clarify whether this is possible, and how it may be done if it is.

class Human
{
    int age;
    int height;

    public static void main2()
    {
        String eye_colour="Blue";
    }

}
class Tobi_Brown 
{
    public static void main()
    {


Tobi_Brown a=new Tobi_Brown();

        System.out.println("The eye colour is " + Human.main2().eye_colour);//Accessing eye_colour
    }
}

Thanks is advance!

4
  • 3
    variable dies when the method ends Mar 7, 2020 at 7:55
  • 2
    local kind of means that it is only accessible in their block (or inner block), even not in the same class, nor in a different block in the same method. Further, as Goldy commented, the variables only exist - have memory position - while the block (also the whole method can be considered one) they are declared in is active
    – user85421
    Mar 7, 2020 at 7:56
  • needing such access is a sign that the whole design is not correct and should be changed (in questions example, eye color should be an attribute (field) of Human)
    – user85421
    Mar 7, 2020 at 8:04
  • Refer Java Language Specification §6.3 Scope of a Declaration. A quote: The scope of a local variable declaration in a block (§14.4) is the rest of the block in which the declaration appears By the way, are you familiar with this? How much research effort is expected of Stack Overflow users?
    – Abra
    Mar 7, 2020 at 8:04

2 Answers 2

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Local variables are accessible inside the block (if-else/for/while) where they are declared. If you want to use any variables that belong to other classes, you can use static variables.

class Human
{
    public static String eye_color = "Blue";
    int age;
    int height;

    public static void main()
    {
    }

}

And you can access it in other classes like:

class Tobi_Brown 
{
    public static void main()
    {


Tobi_Brown a=new Tobi_Brown();

        System.out.println("The eye colour is " + Human.eye_colour);//Accessing eye_colour
    }
}
2
  • 1
    They're not even accessible within the method, they're accessible within the same block (a local declared inside a loop body isn't accessible once you exit). Mar 7, 2020 at 7:59
  • 1
    I would not make the field static (Humans may have different eye colors, and better example using created instance)
    – user85421
    Mar 7, 2020 at 8:06
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main2() is a Method and can only return one value of a certain type or nothing. Everything else is lost after the method ends. Currently your return type is void thus returning nothing. If you change your return type from void to String and return the eye color you can use it.

public class Human {

    public static String main2() {
        String hairColor = "Red";
        String eye_colour = "Blue";
        return eye_colour;
        // hairColor is now lost.
    }

}

// In another class or the same.
public static void main(String[] args) {
    String eyeColor = Human.main2();
    System.out.println("The eye colour is " + eyeColor);
}

Does this make sense through? Id say no. We want every human to have his own eye color. So if you have a human called Tobi_Brown with brown eye color, how can this be expressed with java code?

public class Human {

    public String eyeColor;
    public int age;
    public int height;

}

// Again in another class or the same.
public static void main(String[] args) {
    Human tobiBrown = new Human();
    tobiBrown.eyeColor = "brown";
    Human sarahSora = new Human();
    sarahSora.eyeColor = "Sky blue";
    System.out.println("The eye colour is " + tobiBrown.eyeColor);
    System.out.println("The eye colour is " + sarahSora.eyeColor);
}

Notice how tobiBrown and sarahSora are both Human with just different eye_colour. Human humanName = new Human() creates a new object of type Human. Every human can have his own eye_colour, age and height.

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