2

I know the typical use case for $ and $$. But, I took a Dataweave course and it was used for something else and I think for this use case it was required for it to be enclosed in parens, i.e. ($). It flattend out the entire object (or something like that). I can't find documentation on it. An example would be much appreciated.

What I thought existed was something like this.

Input:

[
    {
        "message1": "Hello world!"
    },
    {
        "message2": "Hello world!"
    },
    {
        "message3": "Hello world!"
    }
]

DW:

payload map $

Will produce this output:

[
  {
    "message1": "Hello world!"
  },
  {
    "message2": "Hello world!"
  },
  {
    "message3": "Hello world!"
  }
]

However, I thought there was a simple use of $ that could give me this output (I can't remember if it was inside of an array or not but probably):

[{
    "message1": "Hello world!",
    "message2": "Hello world!",
    "message3": "Hello world!"
}]
7
  • Are you referring to something like this Dale {($)}?
    – user3078986
    Commented Mar 9, 2020 at 19:53
  • @George, I edited the question. Does this ring a bell?
    – Dale
    Commented Mar 9, 2020 at 20:53
  • Yes it does @Dale. @machaval does a pretty good job explaining it below. Remove the array from the output above and you should have what () does when it appears an an l-value inside {}.
    – user3078986
    Commented Mar 9, 2020 at 23:57
  • The simple use of ($) in class was within the context of iterating an array of objects, what I was showing is how can you get to collapse the current object you iterate (i.e. $) over into a new object. Something like this, assuming payload is an array of objects: payload map { newfield: "newvalue", ($) }. Makes sense?
    – user3078986
    Commented Mar 10, 2020 at 0:00
  • @George That is exactly what I was looking for. And collapse is the word I was looking for. Thank you.
    – Dale
    Commented Mar 10, 2020 at 3:35

2 Answers 2

7

Let me explain $ $$ $$$ just to be on the same page. When you see that they are variable references to an implicit lambda parameter. Let me give you an example

[3,7,11] map ((item,index) -> {a: item, b: index})

This is how one would write a map function with a explicit lambda

((item,index) -> {a: item, b: index})

Now there is a way to avoid some of the bolierplate code and is by using the implicit lambda feature

[3,7,11] map  {a: $, b: $$}

What is happening under the hood is that the DW compiler inserts a lambda declaration

[3,7,11] map  (($, $$) -> {a: $, b: $$})

So every time you see a dollar sign is just a reference to a parameter of an implicit lambda. Now $ is a reference of the first param $$ is a reference to the second $$$ to the third and following.

Now the second feature you are facing is the dynamic object feature. What this feature does is it flattens all the key value pairs that are present on the enclosed expression into the contained object. For example this code

{
  a: "Literal KVP",
  ([1,2,3] map {($$): $}), //Dynamic kev value pairs
  (c: "Conditional KVP") if(random() > 0.2)
}

Will return something like

{
  "a": "Literal KVP",
  "0": 1,
  "1": 2,
  "2": 3,
  "c": "Conditional KVP"
}

If you break the expression you will see that

([1,2,3] map {($$): $})

Returns

[
  {
    "0": 1
  },
  {
    "1": 2
  },
  {
    "2": 3
  }
]

And then all the key value pairs of each object are flatten in the container parent.

This feature is very useful when going from Json that represents Collections with an Array to Xml that represents collections with repeated elements.

3

$ or $$ or even $$$ is just short hand for the input parameters of a lambda function. For instance, an example of the longform of the map function is payload map (item, index) -> {(index): item} and this can be re-written using the shorthand as payload map {($$): $}.

It could be also that they were setting a dynamic key in an object, which would need to be enclosed in parens. That's the only use case I can think of off the top of my head that would require it to be enclosed.

For every function, the $ may have a different meaning, but it always corresponds to the input parameter of the same position in the lambda function. It is typically best practice to still use the long form so that your code is easily readable, and also allows for nested functions to be easier to keep separate

I hope this helps! Good luck

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