112

I want to achieve something like this:

def foo():
   try:
       raise IOError('Stuff ')
   except:
       raise

def bar(arg1):
    try:
       foo()
    except Exception as e:
       e.message = e.message + 'happens at %s' % arg1
       raise

bar('arg1')
Traceback...
  IOError('Stuff Happens at arg1')

But what I get is:

Traceback..
  IOError('Stuff')

Any clues as to how to achieve this? How to do it both in Python 2 and 3?

102

I'd do it like this so changing its type in foo() won't require also changing it in bar().

def foo():
    try:
        raise IOError('Stuff')
    except:
        raise

def bar(arg1):
    try:
        foo()
    except Exception as e:
        raise type(e)(e.message + ' happens at %s' % arg1)

bar('arg1')

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 13, in <module>
    bar('arg1')
  File "test.py", line 11, in bar
    raise type(e)(e.message + ' happens at %s' % arg1)
IOError: Stuff happens at arg1

Update 1

Here's a slight modification that preserves the original traceback:

...
def bar(arg1):
    try:
        foo()
    except Exception as e:
        import sys
        raise type(e), type(e)(e.message +
                               ' happens at %s' % arg1), sys.exc_info()[2]

bar('arg1')

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 16, in <module>
    bar('arg1')
  File "test.py", line 11, in bar
    foo()
  File "test.py", line 5, in foo
    raise IOError('Stuff')
IOError: Stuff happens at arg1

Update 2

For Python 3.x, the code in my first update is syntactically incorrect plus the idea of having a message attribute on BaseException was retracted in a change to PEP 352 on 2012-05-16 (my first update was posted on 2012-03-12). So currently, in Python 3.5.2 anyway, you'd need to do something along these lines to preserve the traceback and not hardcode the type of exception in function bar(). Also note that there will be the line:

During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred:

in the traceback messages displayed.

# for Python 3.x
...
def bar(arg1):
    try:
        foo()
    except Exception as e:
        import sys
        raise type(e)(str(e) +
                      ' happens at %s' % arg1).with_traceback(sys.exc_info()[2])

bar('arg1')

Update 3

A commenter asked if there was a way that would work in both Python 2 and 3. Although the answer might seem to be "No" due to the syntax differences, there is a way around that by using a helper function like reraise() in the six add-on module. So, if you'd rather not use the library for some reason, below is a simplified standalone version.

Note too, that since the exception is reraised within the reraise() function, that will appear in whatever traceback is raised, but the final result is what you want.

import sys

if sys.version_info.major < 3:  # Python 2?
    # Using exec avoids a SyntaxError in Python 3.
    exec("""def reraise(exc_type, exc_value, exc_traceback=None):
                raise exc_type, exc_value, exc_traceback""")
else:
    def reraise(exc_type, exc_value, exc_traceback=None):
        if exc_value is None:
            exc_value = exc_type()
        if exc_value.__traceback__ is not exc_traceback:
            raise exc_value.with_traceback(exc_traceback)
        raise exc_value

def foo():
    try:
        raise IOError('Stuff')
    except:
        raise

def bar(arg1):
    try:
       foo()
    except Exception as e:
        reraise(type(e), type(e)(str(e) +
                                 ' happens at %s' % arg1), sys.exc_info()[2])

bar('arg1')
  • 3
    That loses the backtrace, kind of defeating the point of adding information to an existing exception. Also, it doesn't work exceptions with ctor that takes >1 arguments (the type is something you cannot control from the place where you catch the exception). – Václav Slavík Mar 12 '12 at 16:09
  • 1
    @Václav: It's fairly easy to prevent losing the backtrace -- as shown in the update I added. While this still doesn't handle every conceivable exception, it does work for cases similar to what was shown in the OP's question. – martineau Mar 12 '12 at 21:11
  • 1
    This isn't quite right. If type(e) overrides __str__, you may get undesirable results. Also note that the second argument is passed to the constructor given by the first argument, which yields a somewhat nonsensical type(e)(type(e)(e.message). Thirdly, e.message is deprecated in favor of e.args[0]. – bukzor Dec 11 '13 at 23:18
  • 1
    so, there isn't a portable way that works in both Python 2 and 3? – Elias Dorneles Aug 1 '14 at 17:09
  • 1
    @joshsvoss: Just to make it lazily imported (delayed until actually needed) -- ideally exceptions are cases not conforming to the general rule -- however moving it to the top of the function or module would be fine, too. – martineau Aug 12 '14 at 0:04
72

In case you came here searching for a solution for Python 3 the manual says:

When raising a new exception (rather than using a bare raise to re-raise the exception currently being handled), the implicit exception context can be supplemented with an explicit cause by using from with raise:

raise new_exc from original_exc

Example:

try:
    return [permission() for permission in self.permission_classes]
except TypeError as e:
    raise TypeError("Make sure your view's 'permission_classes' are iterable. "
                    "If you use '()' to generate a set with a single element "
                    "make sure that there is a comma behind the one (element,).") from e

Which looks like this in the end:

2017-09-06 16:50:14,797 [ERROR] django.request: Internal Server Error: /v1/sendEmail/
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "venv/lib/python3.4/site-packages/rest_framework/views.py", line 275, in get_permissions
    return [permission() for permission in self.permission_classes]
TypeError: 'type' object is not iterable 

The above exception was the direct cause of the following exception:

Traceback (most recent call last):
    # Traceback removed...
TypeError: Make sure your view's Permission_classes are iterable. If 
     you use parens () to generate a set with a single element make 
     sure that there is a (comma,) behind the one element.

Turning a totally nondescript TypeError into a nice message with hints towards a solution without messing up the original Exception.

  • 8
    This is the best solution, since the resulting exception points back to the original cause, supply more detail. – J.T Aug 6 '18 at 21:28
21

Assuming you don't want to or can't modify foo(), you can do this:

try:
    raise IOError('stuff')
except Exception as e:
    if len(e.args) >= 1:
        e.args = (e.args[0] + ' happens',) + e.args[1:]
    raise

This is indeed the only solution here that solves the problem in Python 3 without an ugly and confusing "During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred" message.

In case the re-raising line should be added to the stack trace, writing raise e instead of raise will do the trick.

  • but in this case if the exception changes in foo, I have to change bar as well right.? – anijhaw May 19 '11 at 17:56
  • 1
    If you catch Exception (edited above), you can catch any standard library exception (as well as those that inherit from Exception and call Exception.__init__). – Steve Howard May 19 '11 at 18:01
  • 5
    to be more complete/cooperative, include the other parts of the original tuple: e.args = ('mynewstr' + e.args[0],) + e.args[1:] – Dubslow Jan 31 '18 at 12:06
  • 1
    @nmz787 This is the best solution for Python 3 in fact. What exactly is your error? – Christian Nov 5 '18 at 20:27
  • 1
    @Dubslow and martineau I incorporated your suggestions into an edit. – Christian Nov 5 '18 at 20:28
3

One handy approach that I used is to use class attribute as storage for details, as class attribute is accessible both from class object and class instance:

class CustomError(Exception):
    details = None

Then in your code:

exc = CustomError('Some message')
exc.details('Details -- add whatever you want')
raise exc

And when catching an error:

except CustomError, e:
    # Do whatever you want with the exception instance
    print e
    print e.details
  • Not really useful since the OP is requesting that the details be printed as part of the stack trace when the original exception is thrown and not caught. – cowbert Jul 31 '17 at 14:24
  • I think the solution is good. But the description is not true. Class attributes are copied to instances when you instantiate them. So when you modify the attribute "details", of the instance, the class attribute still will be None. Anyway we want this behavior here. – Adam Wallner Sep 12 at 21:20
2

Unlike previous answers, this works in the face of exceptions with really bad __str__. It does modify the type however, in order to factor out unhelpful __str__ implementations.

I'd still like to find an additional improvement that doesn't modify the type.

from contextlib import contextmanager
@contextmanager
def helpful_info():
    try:
        yield
    except Exception as e:
        class CloneException(Exception): pass
        CloneException.__name__ = type(e).__name__
        CloneException.__module___ = type(e).__module__
        helpful_message = '%s\n\nhelpful info!' % e
        import sys
        raise CloneException, helpful_message, sys.exc_traceback


class BadException(Exception):
    def __str__(self):
        return 'wat.'

with helpful_info():
    raise BadException('fooooo')

The original traceback and type (name) are preserved.

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "re_raise.py", line 20, in <module>
    raise BadException('fooooo')
  File "/usr/lib64/python2.6/contextlib.py", line 34, in __exit__
    self.gen.throw(type, value, traceback)
  File "re_raise.py", line 5, in helpful_info
    yield
  File "re_raise.py", line 20, in <module>
    raise BadException('fooooo')
__main__.BadException: wat.

helpful info!
2

I will provide a snippet of code that I use often whenever I want to add extra info to an exception. I works both in Python 2.7 and 3.6.

import sys
import traceback

try:
    a = 1
    b = 1j

    # The line below raises an exception because
    # we cannot compare int to complex.
    m = max(a, b)  

except Exception as ex:
    # I create my  informational message for debugging:
    msg = "a=%r, b=%r" % (a, b)

    # Gather the information from the original exception:
    exc_type, exc_value, exc_traceback = sys.exc_info()

    # Format the original exception for a nice printout:
    traceback_string = ''.join(traceback.format_exception(
        exc_type, exc_value, exc_traceback))

    # Re-raise a new exception of the same class as the original one, 
    # using my custom message and the original traceback:
    raise type(ex)("%s\n\nORIGINAL TRACEBACK:\n\n%s\n" % (msg, traceback_string))

The code above results in the following output:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
TypeError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-6-09b74752c60d> in <module>()
     14     raise type(ex)(
     15         "%s\n\nORIGINAL TRACEBACK:\n\n%s\n" %
---> 16         (msg, traceback_string))

TypeError: a=1, b=1j

ORIGINAL TRACEBACK:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<ipython-input-6-09b74752c60d>", line 7, in <module>
    m = max(a, b)  # Cannot compare int to complex
TypeError: no ordering relation is defined for complex numbers


I know this deviates a little from the example provided in the question, but nevertheless I hope someone finds it useful.

2

I don't like all the given answers so far. They are still too verbose imho. In either code and message output.

All i want to have is the stacktrace pointing to the source exception, no exception stuff in between, so no creation of new exceptions, just re-raising the original with all the relevant stack frame states in it, that led there.

Steve Howard gave a nice answer which i want to extend, no, reduce ... to python 3 only.

except Exception as e:
    e.args = ("Some failure state", *e.args)
    raise

The only new thing is the parameter expansion/unpacking which makes it small and easy enough for me to use.

Try it:

foo = None

try:
    try:
        state = "bar"
        foo.append(state)

    except Exception as e:
        e.args = ("Appending '"+state+"' failed", *e.args)
        raise

    print(foo[0]) # would raise too

except Exception as e:
    e.args = ("print(foo) failed: " + str(foo), *e.args)
    raise

This will give you:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 6, in <module>
    foo.append(state)
AttributeError: ('print(foo) failed: None', "Appending 'bar' failed", "'NoneType' object has no attribute 'append'")

A simple pretty-print could be something like

print("\n".join( "-"*i+" "+j for i,j in enumerate(e.args)))
1

You can define your own exception that inherits from another and create it's own constructor to set value.

For example:

class MyError(Exception):
   def __init__(self, value):
     self.value = value
     Exception.__init__(self)

   def __str__(self):
     return repr(self.value)
  • 2
    Doesn't address need to change/append something to the message of the original exception (but could be fixed, I think). – martineau May 19 '11 at 18:33
-6

Maybe

except Exception as e:
    raise IOError(e.message + 'happens at %s'%arg1)

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