15

In the C++20 standard, it is said that array types are implicit lifetime type.

Does it mean that an array to a non implicit lifetime type can be implicitly created? The implicit creation of such an array would not cause creation of the array's elements?

Consider this case:

//implicit creation of an array of std::string 
//but not the std::string elements:
void * ptr = operator new(sizeof (std::string) * 10);
//use launder to get a "pointer to object" (which object?)
std::string * sptr = std::launder(static_cast<std::string*>(ptr));
//pointer arithmetic on not created array elements well defined?
new (sptr+1) std::string("second element");

Is this code not UB any more since C++20?


Maybe this way is better?

//implicit creation of an array of std::string 
//but not the std::string elements:
void * ptr = operator new(sizeof (std::string) * 10);
//use launder to get a "pointer to object" (actually not necessary)
std::string (* sptr)[10] = std::launder(static_cast<std::string(*)[10]>(ptr));
//pointer arithmetic on an array is well defined
new (*sptr+1) std::string("second element");

TC Answer + Comments conclusion:

  1. Array elements are not created but the array is created
  2. The use of launder in the first example cause UB, and is not necessary in the second example.

The right code is:

    //implicit creation of an array of std::string 
    //but not the std::string elements:
    void * ptr = operator new(sizeof (std::string) * 10);
    //the pointer already points to the implicitly created object
    //so casting is enough 
    std::string (* sptr)[10] = static_cast<std::string(*)[10]>(ptr);
    //pointer arithmetic on an array is well defined
    new (*sptr+1) std::string("second element");
19
  • 1
    I've just done a search through the (draft) C++20 standard, and found nothing that describes arrays as an "implicit lifetime type" (and, yes, I searched for variations). Please provide a more detailed description of your claim (e.g. section and clause in the standard). Bit hard to answer your question without being able to find the source, let alone any relevant context.
    – Peter
    Mar 11, 2020 at 8:27
  • 1
    @Peter: eel.is/c++draft/basic.types#9, last sentence
    – geza
    Mar 11, 2020 at 9:14
  • I was looking at the PDF open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2020/n4849.pdf (ostensibly the latest working draft) and it doesn't even have that sentence. Looks like you'll need to find the meaning of "implicit-lifetime" too. I suspect your link may have picked up some "edits in progress" that haven't even made it into released working drafts.
    – Peter
    Mar 11, 2020 at 9:58
  • 2
    @Peter The changes are the result of P0593 being merged into the standard from the recent Prague meeting. They haven't yet released the resulting draft yet, but you can see the merged wording in this commit.
    – walnut
    Mar 11, 2020 at 10:45
  • @Oliv where's the quote says that "void * ptr = operator new(sizeof (std::string) * 10);" will create an array of type std::string? [expr.new] does not say that.
    – xmh0511
    Jun 30, 2020 at 4:54

1 Answer 1

5

Does it means that an array to a non implicit lifetime type can be implicitly created?

Yes.

The implicit creation of such an array would not cause creation of the array's elements?

Yes.

This is what makes std::vector implementable in ordinary C++.

6
  • Could you confirm also that std::launder(static_cast<std::string*>(ptr)) does not return a pointer to the first element of the array because it is not within its lifetime, but that std::launder(static_cast<std::string(*)[10]>(ptr)) return a pointer to the array, because the array is within its lifetime?
    – Oliv
    Mar 11, 2020 at 16:31
  • @Oliv And I suppose the std::launder isn't actually needed, because eel.is/c++draft/intro.object#11 guarantees that ptr will already point to the array?
    – walnut
    Mar 11, 2020 at 16:37
  • @walnut, I missed that. So a static_cast to std::string (*) [10] should be sufficient! tx.
    – Oliv
    Mar 11, 2020 at 17:07
  • @Oliv But I guess the question then becomes whether your first example without the std::launder will be well-defined. There is no std::string object to point to, but ptr could point to the array, so that the static cast will leave the value unchanged and sptr will point to the array as well. With std::launder it is UB simply because of std::launder's requirements.
    – walnut
    Mar 11, 2020 at 17:14
  • @walnut Indeed, the necessity of this circumvolution was std::launder. Cool that makes the code much more readable.
    – Oliv
    Mar 11, 2020 at 17:21

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