2

So I have a IQueryable extension that does a little more than this block of code. Essentially I'm combining of bunch of strings and afterwards doing a Contains on them. The problem I'm running into is that Entity Framework Core doesn't support System.String.Concat, and executes that part of the query locally which is definitely not what I want.

Here's the little loop I was using to add these different strings together:

                List<Expression> stringExpressionsToConcat = new List<Expression>();
                foreach (var member in memberExpressions)
                {
                    stringExpressionsToConcat.Add(member);
                    stringExpressionsToConcat.Add(spaceConstant);
                }
                //call the concat to create the final term to search on
                NewArrayExpression arrayExpression = Expression.NewArrayInit(typeof(string), stringExpressionsToConcat);
                searchStringExpression = Expression.Call(concatMethod, arrayExpression);

This is working client side, but will not get compiled for Entity to SQL. I had the same problem on an Order By clause where I was doing something like this:

.ThenByDescending(e => string.Concat(e.FirstName, " ", e.LastName))

This obviously also did not translate to Entity to SQL, since it's exactly what I'm building in my expression tree. However, changing it to this....

.ThenByDescending(e => e.FirstName + " " + e.LastName)

Does translate to Entity to SQL. So I'm wondering how I can create the same expression represented in the code above that correctly gets sent to SQL. I've tried using Expression.Add but add is not supported on string types in the expression builder. Is this possible or is there some extra code in Entity Framework that makes this possible? I've tried to explore the source code on GitHub but it's a little bit overwhelming to find exactly where it is happening.

3

Aha! I have figured it out!! This expression tree exhibits the same behavior and sends the data to SQL!

Modified code below:

//more than one member has the property, we need to combine them with spaces in between
List<Expression> stringExpressionsToConcat = new List<Expression>();
foreach (var member in memberExpressions)
{
    stringExpressionsToConcat.Add(member);
    stringExpressionsToConcat.Add(spaceConstant);
}

searchStringExpression = stringExpressionsToConcat[0];
for (int i = 1; i < stringExpressionsToConcat.Count; i++)
{
    searchStringExpression = Expression.Add(searchStringExpression, 
    stringExpressionsToConcat[i], typeof(string).GetMethod("Concat", new[] { 
    typeof(string), typeof(string) }));
}

That change goes from Entity Framework throwing the warning in 2.2 (and the error in 3.1) to translating it into the below SQL code!

([e].[MemberExpression1] + N' ') + [e].[MemberExpression2]) + N' ') + [e].[MemberExpression3]) + N' ')

This is exactly how Entity Framework is generating the SQL clause I talked about in my answer with the Order By! I'm not sure what the reasoning is...yet, but if you're looking to create your own expression trees that add together strings that the Entity Framework Core tree visitor can translate into sql this is it!

Credit to this answer for pointing me in the correct direction: https://stackoverflow.com/a/3858421/5245385

-2

Basically: Wait for EfCore to support this at some point, or use Ef classic for now.

EfCore is very limited in what it supports from LINQ - feels a little like the people developing it did never use it and never read about all the stuff LINQ can. THere is no workaround.

In EfCore 2.2 it was doing client side evaluation - in 3.1 that is disabled and it tells you to go and program different.

If you feel like it, open an issue on the github page and then maybe someone picks it up for the November 5.0 release. Chance is no because this IS a little more arcane and they are overloaded with issues that are way more common.

3
  • So just to be clear there's absolutely no way to represent stringType + stringType in expression trees besides a Concat? I'm aware the Concat is not supported but something behind the scenes is happening that is allowing stringType + stringType to be translated to SQL properly, I just don't know how to write that expression tree. – Richard Cawthon Mar 11 '20 at 19:21
  • you do not because it is not about you writing it - it is about you writing it and the EfCore Tree visitor NOT throwing an exception because it finds an unsupported set of nodes. Simple like that. – TomTom Mar 11 '20 at 19:25
  • I figured it out and posted an answer. I'm not sure we were on the same page regarding my question. – Richard Cawthon Mar 11 '20 at 19:50

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