-3
string = input("Enter any characters you want: ")

characters = input("What characters would you like to make disappear: ")
string = string.replace(str(characters), "")

print(string)
  1. When I enter The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog into the string variable
  2. And then I enter aeiou
  3. I want it to return Th qck brwn fx jmps vr th lzy dg

However when I enter The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog it returns as is.

No loops or functions are allowed to be used. Only the replace() or strip() functions can be used.

10
  • 4
    I don't think this can be done with the restrictions you specify. strip() only works at the ends of the string, it won't replace in the middle. And replace() only replaces whole matches, not individual characters. – Barmar Mar 11 '20 at 23:04
  • 6
    Why the restrictions? – Peter Wood Mar 11 '20 at 23:08
  • 1
    Why these restrictions? And also regex cant be used? – Shadab Hussain Mar 11 '20 at 23:12
  • 1
    Sounds like you've been asked to do this geeksforgeeks.org/program-remove-vowels-string – OneCricketeer Mar 11 '20 at 23:12
  • 1
    This is an assignment, isn’t it? You need to try harder to work this out for yourself. – barny Mar 11 '20 at 23:12
1

Try this recursive function call:

def remove_chars(original_string, characters_to_remove):
    if len(original_string) == 1:
        return "" if original_string in characters_to_remove else original_string
    return remove_chars(original_string[0:int(len(original_string)/2)], characters_to_remove) +  strip(original_string[int(len(original_string)/2):len(original_string)], characters_to_remove)
remove_chars(original_string, characters_to_remove)

Try this code if you can use for loop:

string = input("Enter any characters you want: ")
characters = input("What characters would you like to make disappear: ")
for i in characters:
    string = string.replace(i,"")
print(string)

Or using regex:

import re
original_string = "The quick brown fox jumps over"
characters_to_remove = "aeiou"

pattern = "[" + characters_to_remove + "]"
new_string = re.sub(pattern, "", original_string)

print(new_string)
5
  • 1
    No loops or functions are allowed to be used. Only the replace() or strip() functions can be used. – megargayu Mar 11 '20 at 23:07
  • 1
    You can't use external functions or loops. – megargayu Mar 11 '20 at 23:28
  • I have updated the code with a recursive function, no other functions are getting called @AyushGarg – Shadab Hussain Mar 11 '20 at 23:42
  • The recursive function could lead to an error RecursionError, but this is probably the best solution. Nice! – megargayu Mar 11 '20 at 23:44
  • Recursion is still a form of looping, IMO – OneCricketeer Mar 12 '20 at 3:34
0

With a comprehension:

string = ''.join(char for char in string if char not in characters)

I can only think of a couple of ways without any for statement.

You could unroll the loop:

if 'a' in characters:
    string = string.replace('a', '')
if 'b' in characters:
    string = string.replace('b', '')
# etc

Or define your own function:

def remove(characters, string):
    string = string.strip(characters)
    if len(string) < 2:
        return string
    else:
        return string[0] + remove(characters, string[1:-2]) + string[-1]

edit: I fixed the comprehension above to use str.join

Regarding comments below saying a comprehension is a loop. The syntax looks like a loop but this is a generator expression, which creates a generator object.

>>> s = 'The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog'
>>> e = 'aeiou'
>>> (c for c in s if c not in e)
<generator object <genexpr> at 0x038A9198>

So no looping has occurred. It's only when the generator object is consumed by some process, for example a loop, that any looping will happen.

In my example I use str.join which contains a loop someone else has written, not me:

>>> ''.join(_)
'Th qck brwn fx jmps vr th lzy dg'
9
  • Why do you need the if statements on the un-rolled version? – OneCricketeer Mar 11 '20 at 23:14
  • 2
    @cricket_007 how would you know if they need to be replaced? – Tomerikoo Mar 11 '20 at 23:15
  • I was just thinking string.replace('a', '').replace('b',''), but that isn't right... – OneCricketeer Mar 11 '20 at 23:16
  • @cricket_007 I agree that in general it is not necessary to check with replace because if the char is not found nothing will happen. Problem here is that you want to make sure it is even asked to be replaced – Tomerikoo Mar 11 '20 at 23:18
  • @Tomerikoo Yeah, I see that now – OneCricketeer Mar 11 '20 at 23:19

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.