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In the GTK library, one can find the following definition:

/**
 * GCallback:
 * 
 * The type used for callback functions in structure definitions and function 
 * signatures. This doesn't mean that all callback functions must take no 
 * parameters and return void. The required signature of a callback function 
 * is determined by the context in which is used (e.g. the signal to which it 
 * is connected). Use G_CALLBACK() to cast the callback function to a #GCallback. 
 */
typedef void  (*GCallback)              (void);

This is presumably a typedef for function pointers that take no parameters and return void.

However - in the Hello World example in the GTK site, the following code is exhibited:

g_signal_connect (app, "activate", G_CALLBACK (activate), NULL);

Where activate is a function that returns void but takes two parameters. (G_CALLBACK is a macro that simply casts to GCallback).

And indeed - the comment above the GCallback typedef suggests that:

This doesn't mean that all callback functions must take no parameters and return void

This code indeed compiles and runs. So how is this possible?

  • 1
    Any function pointer can be converted to any function pointer type. Only when you call, it needs to be correct type. This is like void * for pointers. – KamilCuk Mar 14 at 17:51
  • This implies that any platform GTK works on, such conversion is possible. – Lorinczy Zsigmond Mar 14 at 19:59
2

The C11 standard §6.3 Conversions, and more precisely §6.3.2.3 Pointers ¶8 says:

A pointer to a function of one type may be converted to a pointer to a function of another type and back again; the result shall compare equal to the original pointer. If a converted pointer is used to call a function whose type is not compatible with the referenced type, the behavior is undefined.

The GTK code places the onus on the programmer to pass the appropriate type of function pointer to the function taking a callback.

g_signal_connect (app, "activate", G_CALLBACK (activate), NULL);

Where activate is a function that returns void but takes two parameters. (G_CALLBACK is a macro that simply casts to GCallback).

Let's assume the two parameters are int; their type is coincidental to the discussion.

extern void activate(int, int);

The code in g_signal_connect() gets 4 pointers. The third is the callback; it is formally of type void (*callback)(void).

The code inside g_signal_connect() expects to call the callback with 2 integers (arg1 and arg2), so it is required to use:

((void (*)(int, int)callback)(arg1, arg2);

to force the 'generic' type of the callback to the correct function pointer type — otherwise, it cannot avoid invoking undefined behaviour. You're required to know that g_signal_connect() requires such a pointer as the callback parameter, cast to the generic type, and you must pass it such a pointer suitably cast.

Remember, too, that one way of exhibiting 'undefined behaviour' is to 'behave as expected, even though the expectations are not guaranteed by the standard'. Other ways of exhibiting undefined behaviour include crashing or corrupting memory.


Side note.

C11 §6.2.5 Types ¶28 says:

A pointer to void shall have the same representation and alignment requirements as a pointer to a character type.48) Similarly, pointers to qualified or unqualified versions of compatible types shall have the same representation and alignment requirements. All pointers to structure types shall have the same representation and alignment requirements as each other. All pointers to union types shall have the same representation and alignment requirements as each other. Pointers to other types need not have the same representation or alignment requirements.

48) The same representation and alignment requirements are meant to imply interchangeability as arguments to functions, return values from functions, and members of unions.

The requirements of §6.3.2.3¶8 seem to imply that all pointers to different function types must have the same representation and alignment requirements as each other; otherwise, it becomes hard to guarantee the round-trip conversion requirement of §6.3.2.3¶8.

Another consequence of §6.2.5¶28 is that you cannot reliably convert between a pointer to function type and a pointer to object type such as void *. This has consequences for functions such as dlsym(); it is hard to use them cleanly — the compiler is likely to complain if you have stringent warning levels enabled.

Compiling some code which converts between function pointer and object pointer (and vice versa), GCC 9.3.0 with gcc -std=c99 -O3 -Wall -pedantic -Wdeclaration-after-statement -Wold-style-definition -Wold-style-declaration -Wnested-externs -Wmissing-prototypes -Werror … gives:

…: error: ISO C forbids conversion of function pointer to object pointer type [-Werror=pedantic]
…: error: ISO C forbids conversion of object pointer to function pointer type [-Werror=pedantic]

It's a warning if you don't have -Werror or -pedantic-errors in effect, and it's ignored if you don't have -pedantic or -pedantic-errors in effect.

Beware the differences between -pedantic (aka -Wpedantic) and -pedantic-errors, as documented by GCC under Options to Request or Suppress Warnings.

| improve this answer | |
  • I see. So what happens if by programmer error, the function passed into g_signal_connect does not take (int, int), but for example (double). Is that undefined behavior? If so, does the UB occur when g_signal_connect tries to cast to void (*)(int, int), or does it happen when it calls the function pointer? – Aviv Cohn Mar 14 at 20:06
  • Yes—that would be undefined behaviour. – Jonathan Leffler Mar 14 at 20:07
  • 1
    Note however, that the POSIX standard mandates that you CAN convert a function pointer to a void * and back again to get the same original pointer. So most (all?) C compilers allow it as an extension. This capability is used in many POSIX APIs – Chris Dodd Mar 14 at 20:10

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