1

There are many questions about passing smart pointers by reference. What I did not find is a definite answer on: Can we pass a nullptr to a method accepting a smart pointer by reference?

Example:

void myFunc(std::shared_ptr<std::string> &myStrRef) {
   // do something
}

void main() {
   myFunc(nullptr);
}
  • 3
    What does your compiler say? – JohnFilleau Mar 16 at 15:43
  • 2
    The fact that std::shared_ptr<std::string> &myStrRef is non-const leads me to believe that it's some sort of output parameters. While there are ways to fix the compilation error, whether or not they are correct depends on what the function actually wants to do. It doesn't seem like it was designed to work without begin given an actual shared_ptr to set. – François Andrieux Mar 16 at 15:46
  • Share_ptr is default itself to nullptr. – Build Succeeded Mar 16 at 16:22
  • Please don't use void main(). The return type of main must always be int in standard C++. void main() is a non-standard compiler extension. – walnut Mar 16 at 16:24
7

Can we pass a nullptr to a method accepting a smart pointer by reference?

Not with a non-const lvalue reference.

void myFunc(std::shared_ptr<std::string> &myStrRef) {
   // do something
}

void main() {
   myFunc(nullptr);
}

Will fail to compile because myStrRef can't be bound to a temporary object. If you instead had

void myFunc(const std::shared_ptr<std::string> &myStrRef) {
   // do something
}
// or
void myFunc(std::shared_ptr<std::string> &&myStrRef) {
   // do something
}

Then it would be legal because those references can bind to a temporary object.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Note however, that the first case does also not guard against passing an existing (non-temporary) shared_ptr that just happens to have a value of nullptr. – ComicSansMS Mar 16 at 16:19

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