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Can somebody help me to understand how could I use RAW IR data in an project using ESP8266-HTTP-IR-Blaster library ?

I've created a NodeMCU board with an IR sender and receiver according to https://github.com/mdhiggins/ESP8266-HTTP-IR-Blaster

Everything is working fine as long as I'm using the captured codes for ex.: http://NodeMCU-IP/msg?code=E0E040BF:SAMSUNG:32 This is the Code for the Power button (E0E040BF)

As I'm using it in a home automation system, it would very beneficial for me if I had a dedicated ON and OFF sequence, which I found here: http://www.remotecentral.com/cgi-bin/mboard/rc-discrete/thread.cgi?5780 , but unable to translate, modify, or send it via RAW data.

Using Node-red, tried many ways, also implemented a MQTT client to the original project, but did not accept these codes anyhow I try. Does not sends it.

Also tried as a JSON, didn't help.

[
    {
    "type":"raw",
    "data":"[0000, 006D, 0000, 0022, 00AC, 00AC, 0015, 0040, 0015, 0040, 0015, 0040, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0040, 0015, 0040, 0015, 0040, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0040, 0015, 0040, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0040, 0015, 0040, 0015, 0040, 0015, 0040, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0040, 0015, 0040, 0015, 0015, 0015, 0689]",
    "khz":38
    }
]

Any idea what could I try next?

3
  • Samsung IR uses E0E040BF for both ON and OFF, it is a toggle. You can run a simple sketch to decode the IR code of every buttons on your remote using IRremote library. Here is what I did for my project e-tinkers.com/2019/11/build-an-esp32-web-server-and-ir-remote
    – hcheung
    Commented Mar 19, 2020 at 9:53
  • I know it's a toggle right now, but wanted to use dedicated ON and OFF functions, due to the home automation system I use, for ex.: if I leave house turn TV off automatically. Currently I'm using a logic in NodeRed to determinate what was issued last time and change the status in nodered, but it's not the reliable, and would be much effective to use the above provided RAW IR codes, which are for dedicated ON and OFF, sadly I wasn't able to translate it to a code that is accepted by the library. Commented Mar 20, 2020 at 18:41
  • The remotecentral link that you share is not raw ir code, it is Pronto code, so you can't send it as raw IR. On the Arduino IRremote library, there is c++ code irPronto.cpp that you might want to take a look, it is not even an Arduino code, but in c++, I guess it came into the Arduino library from the previous source code, no document on how to use it, but it shows how the Pronto can be sent or decode into Linux Iirc format. Good luck.
    – hcheung
    Commented Mar 23, 2020 at 9:02

1 Answer 1

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A good introduction to the 'Pronto format' that you show above is at Remote Central

For the specific example above, for a Samsung OFF code given at your remote central link, the full code is given as a sequence of 16-bit numbers represented in hexadecimal with spaces in between:

0000 006D 0000 0022 00AC 00AC 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0015 0015 0689

You can break that down as:

  • The preamble (broken out here for interest, but not needed if you already have a working Samsung code):
    • 0x0000 - This is raw code format data
    • 0x006D - Frequency 109 decimal = 38.028kHz (see above link for calculation)
    • 0x0000 - No burst pairs in first sequence
    • 0x0022 - 34 decimal - 34 burst pairs of signal follow
    • 00AC 00AC - First burst of signal - on for 0xAC (172 decimal) cycles at 38kHz, off for the same amount
  • The data:
    • 32 pairs of data "burst pairs" (This data is likely the only part you need if you already have other codes for the same device. See below for how to interpret these manually):
  • The final "burst pair" to terminate the tranmission:
    • 0015 0689 - Final burst of signal - on for 0x15 (21 decimal) cycles, off for 0x689 (1673 decimal) cycles, guaranteeing 44ms without any IR before the next code can be transmitted

To interpret the data manually, copy it out (e.g. into a text editor) in groups of 8 numbers:

0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0015 
0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 
0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0015 
0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 
0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0040 
0015 0040 0015 0015 0015 0015 0015 0040 
0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0015
0015 0015 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0015 

Then:

  • Ignore the columns where all the numbers are the same (columns 1, 3, 5 and 7 above, which represent the on time - 0x15 = 21 decimal cycles of IR at 38kHz )
  • For the remaining columns (which represent the off-time), replace the big numbers (0x40 in this case) with '1' and the small (0x15) with '0'.

For the first line

0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0040 0015 0015 

ignoring the 1st, 3rd, 5th and 7th columns leaves:

0040 0040 0040 0015 

replacing those with 1's and 0's

1    1    1    0

and if you convert that into hexadecimal, it's 'E'

Next line is '0', then 'E' then '0' (already it's comforting to see it starting with the same E0E0 that starts your other Samsung code above...), and the remaining lines make it E0E019E6

Doing the same with the ON code gives you E0E09966

And as I've needed to solve the same problem just recently for the same codes, I can confirm that my Samsung TV responds to those codes as OFF and ON.

Not surprisingly, there are a variety of software tools to convert between formats, and a huge range of formats to describe the same signal (explained very well by xkcd). For example, irdb on GitHUB will decode the above string to "Protocol NECx2, device 7, subdevice 7, OBC 152". It's up to you to know that you have to

  • bit-reverse the device number '07' to get 'E0'
  • bit-reverse the subdevice number (also '07') to get 'E0'
  • convert 152 to hexadecimal and reverse the bits to get '19'
  • calculate the last two digits as ( 0xFF - the bit-reversed OBC ), 0xFF - 0x19 = 0xE6, giving the final 8 bits 'E6'
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