2

I am looking for the most time-efficient way to calculate the number of non-unique items in a large list (around 100,000 items) for Python.

The method I have so far:

original_list = [1, 4, 6, 2, 2, 1, 5, 3, 2]

duplicates_list = []
for item in original_list:
    if original_list.count(item) > 1:
        duplicates_list.append(item)

duplicates_count = len(duplicates_list)

print(duplicates_count)

# Should give the following answer:
5

Currently, a large list of around 70-80K items takes 1-2 mins to perform the calculation. I am wondering if we can reduce the time needed for the calculation as low as possible (maybe to 3-10 seconds).

I really appreciate all the help!

12
  • 3
    len(original_list) - len(set(original_list)) @TimeAndPlaces
    – Todd
    Mar 17, 2020 at 23:12
  • @Todd I need to count all copies of items that have duplicates. I believe your solution will also remove 1 copy of each item that has a duplicate. Mar 17, 2020 at 23:14
  • @Todd this doesn't work. It counts the amount of excess, not the population of that set.
    – Prune
    Mar 17, 2020 at 23:15
  • That's true, it will only count the number of duplicates without including the original item in the count.
    – Todd
    Mar 17, 2020 at 23:15
  • @Todd Couldn't you do + 1?
    – Filip
    Mar 17, 2020 at 23:16

2 Answers 2

5

A Counter object should be faster as, in your version, you're calling count() on every item in the list, so 100,000 times per your question. This will perform the Count() once on the whole list, then iterating over the Counter object will only be once per unique value.

original_list = [1, 4, 6, 2, 2, 1, 5, 3, 2]

from collections import Counter
count = Counter(original_list)

dupes = sum(v for k, v in count.items() if v > 1)
0
2

This takes advantage of support for arithmetic operators in the Counter class - both set and Counter support several useful operations:

>>> li = [1, 4, 6, 2, 2, 1, 5, 3, 2]
>>> s  = set(li)
>>>
>>> len(li) - len(s) + len(Counter(li) - Counter(s))
5
>>> 

len(li) - len(set(li)) gives the number of duplicates, or the number of list items left after we take out the set items.

To get a list of set items that are related to an item in the leftover list:

>>> list((Counter(li) - Counter(set(li))))
[1, 2]

And to get the list of duplicates left over in the list after the set items are all removed:

>>> list((Counter(li) - Counter(set(li))).elements())
[1, 2, 2]

If there were a subtract operation for lists, that's what we'd get after subtracting the set from the list.

Suggested optimization

If possible, the application that uses this list of 70-80K items should incrementally build up the Counter from the start as it populates the list. It could have its list, Counter, or other needed structures on hand when needed, so metrics or other types of processing can be shortcut in later steps.

Benchmarks

In no particular order, here's how long it took each algorithm to process a list of 80K random numbers.

>>> li     = [random.randint(0, 100) for _ in range(80 * 1000)]
>>> n_iter = 1000
>>>
>>> timeit.timeit("s = set(li); "
...               "len(li) - len(s) + len(Counter(li) - Counter(s))", 
...               globals=globals(), number=n_iter)
7.048838693
>>> 
>>> timeit.timeit("sum(v for k, v in Counter(li).items() if v > 1)", 
...               globals=globals(), number=n_iter)
5.787936814
>>>
>>> timeit.timeit(original_posters_script, globals=globals(), number=n_iter)
# Takes too much time to sit through. It's very slow. O(N^2)
>>> 

Not surprisingly, the fastest algorithm is the other Counter solution in the selected Answer.

3
  • Thanks for looking into it! How would I define the number of duplicates + items that have duplicates, then? Just looking for a word to lesser the confusion Mar 17, 2020 at 23:54
  • Okay, I got it. Maybe this works: "I want the number of unique non-duplicated items." There's a nuance of difference between "non-duplicated item" vs "non-duplicate item".
    – Todd
    Mar 18, 2020 at 0:06
  • Awesome @TimesAndPlaces
    – Todd
    Mar 18, 2020 at 0:15

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