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When I create a deployment in Kubernetes (specifically Amazon EKS), it spins up N pods:

worker-node-dddf68987-67fsq      192.168.149.142
worker-node-dddf68987-f77ks      192.168.155.15
worker-node-dddf68987-zndn4      192.168.232.226

And those pods can be resolved in DNS as (e.g.) 192-168-232-226.my-namespace.pod.cluster.local.

But they're not resolvable as (e.g.) worker-node-dddf68987-zndn4.my-namespace.pod.cluster.local. Why not?

Every answer I've seen says something like "well actually, you really want to look up the service". I don't.

My motivation is this: when connecting Erlang nodes into a cluster, the node name must match exactly on both ends, and I'd prefer my node name to be worker-node@worker-node-dddf68987-zndn4, rather than worker-node@192.168.232.226.

I can set the "server" node name by using hostname -f, but if that name's not discoverable in DNS, the "client" node can't connect to it.

I'm aware that by using a StatefulSet, I can permanently associate a name with a pod. That's not what I want. My nodes don't have any state. I don't mind that the name changes -- I'm using libcluster, which will automatically deal with Erlang cluster membership. I just want the names to be readable.


Aside: the dashed IP lookup is basically a hack:

# ping 1-1-1-1.default.pod.cluster.local
PING 1-1-1-1.default.pod.cluster.local (1.1.1.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from one.one.one.one (1.1.1.1): icmp_seq=1 ttl=52 time=1.97 ms
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Because kubernetes service creates an abstraction layer in front of pods in deployments and works as a load balancer for them. Pod names are volatile and will change once you recreate the deployment or modify it.

What you're trying to achieve can be done by creating a headless service to disable load balancing:

If there exists a headless service in the same namespace as the pod and with the same name as the subdomain, the cluster’s DNS Server also returns an A or AAAA record for the Pod’s fully qualified hostname.

Or just use StatefulSet for which a headless service is required

Each Pod in a StatefulSet derives its hostname from the name of the StatefulSet and the ordinal of the Pod.

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  • "Pod names are volatile and will change once you recreate the deployment or modify it." -- Yep. I'm cool with that. Erlang will move them in and out of the cluster when that happens. "designed exactly to have a stable network identifiers" -- I don't want stable network identifiers; I want human-readable names. Mar 18, 2020 at 16:55
  • human readble and non-volatile pod names are also a part of StatefulSets concept. Just get familiar with concepts of Deployments and StatefulSets.It seems like you're trying to use kubernetes abstractions in the way they weren't designed for. Mar 19, 2020 at 17:23
  • But I'm not asking for them to be non-volatile. My question is why does K8s conflate human readable with non-volatile? Why are they designed that way? What does it hurt to also register the pod name in DNS? Mar 19, 2020 at 20:15
  • In this case you need to switch off load balancing by creating a "headless service" kubernetes.io/docs/concepts/services-networking/dns-pod-service "If there exists a headless service in the same namespace as the pod and with the same name as the subdomain, the cluster’s DNS Server also returns an A or AAAA record for the Pod’s fully qualified hostname." kubernetes.io/docs/concepts/services-networking/service/… Mar 20, 2020 at 8:38

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