11

Most times I see std::move posted on here, it's referencing the <utility> version.

The std::move in <algorithm> actually does what its name suggests, move, whereas the std::move in <utility> casts its argument to an xvalue, which is basically just a preprocessing step for eventually moving the xvalue into an lvalue. So isn't it kind of confusing for both of these to be named move when the functionality for each is different?

10
  • 1
    Possibly related question: Why was std::swap moved from <algorithm> to <utility>? Commented Mar 18, 2020 at 20:08
  • 3
    Yes, move should have been called make_rvalue or something along those lines. It's frustrating to explain time after time that the single parameter std::move doesn't actually move anything. Commented Mar 18, 2020 at 20:09
  • The one in <algorithm> is simply the one in the <utility> applied to a whole range.
    – ph3rin
    Commented Mar 18, 2020 at 20:09
  • 1
    @KaenbyouRin Yes, but the one in <algorithm> actually does perform the move (assuming that there is a move assignment operator defined for the type we're moving).
    – 24n8
    Commented Mar 18, 2020 at 20:11
  • 1
    Hot take: they should have made std::move an operator instead of a library function. Any better name than std::move would have been longer, which sucks.
    – Brian Bi
    Commented Mar 18, 2020 at 20:16

1 Answer 1

9

So isn't it kind of confusing for both of these to be named move?

It can be confusing, especially those who are not used to languages that support overloading. It is true that programming guidelines typically discourage overloads with separate meanings.

But it is also not very difficult to learn that there are two functions by the same name, although this is subjective. The different argument lists provide sufficient context to easily recognise one from the other.

Why is there a std::move in both and

Because the designers of the language chose to use the same name for both functions.

std::move is a very concise way to express both functions. The one in <algorithm> is complementary to std::copy from the same header.

whereas the std::move in casts its argument to an xvalue, which is basically just a preprocessing step for eventually moving

Describing what the function does is not the only thing that the name of the function can express. In this case, the name expresses the intention of the programmer who used the function: The programmer intends to move from the argument lvalue - if possible.

This is something that programmers may potentially need to write quite often; thus there is a need for very short name.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.