26

I wrote a simple daemon. This daemon should respond when I run any program. How to do this? In a big daemon loop:

while(1)
{
   /* function which catches new programm running */
}

What functions to call in linux, when i'm running a new program (create new process)?

  • 4
    I think we are going to need a little more information – Adam Batkin May 20 '11 at 16:40
  • 6
    @Adam Batkin - I disagree, the question is sufficiently stated, the poster wants to be informed upon process creation – Chris Stratton May 20 '11 at 16:42
  • Is this daemon launching firefox or is firefox being started externally by the user and you want to be notified? Your question could use a little clarification. – Justin Dearing May 20 '11 at 16:44
  • @Chris: That's certainly a valid interpretation. Feel free to edit the question to make that more clear – Adam Batkin May 20 '11 at 16:44
  • 2
    The audit daemon can log the programs that are run by tracing the execve syscall. Maybe you can inspire from it. – Cristian Ciupitu May 20 '11 at 21:30
1

I don't know if there exists a better way, but you could periodically scan the /proc filesystem.

For example, /proc/<pid>/exe is a symlink to the process's executable.

On my systems (Ubuntu/RedHat), /proc/loadavg contains the number of running processes (the number after the forward slash) as well as the pid of the most recently started process. If your daemon polls the file, any change to either of the two numbers will tell it when it needs to re-scan /proc looking for new processes.

This is by no means bullet-proof, but is the most suitable mechanism I can think of.

  • Thx! /proc/loadavg really good. But how the information add into /proc/loadavg? – nub May 20 '11 at 17:00
  • @nub: I am proposing /proc/loadavg as a notification mechanism (which has to be polled). It won't tell you anything beyond that something's changed. To figure out what's changed, you'll need to scan /proc/[0-9]*. – NPE May 20 '11 at 17:03
  • Yes, but how the information of new pid got? Because first this information gets(how?), and theen push into /proc/loadavg. – nub May 20 '11 at 17:10
  • 1
    /proc/loadavg is a sort of fake file exported by the kernel. When you try to read it, you get information directly from the kernel. – Chris Stratton May 20 '11 at 17:36
  • 3
    You could miss lanuch and termination of tens of processes between two scans and thing that nothing happened while processes have started and terminated. – LtWorf Dec 2 '12 at 22:56
65

For Linux, there appears to be an interface in the kernel. Whilst researching this problem I came across people using CONFIG_CONNECTOR and CONFIG_PROC_EVENTS kernel configuration to get events on process death.

Some more google and I found this:

http://netsplit.com/2011/02/09/the-proc-connector-and-socket-filters/

The Proc Connector and Socket Filters Posted on February 9, 2011 by scott

The proc connector is one of those interesting kernel features that most people rarely come across, and even more rarely find documentation on. Likewise the socket filter. This is a shame, because they’re both really quite useful interfaces that might serve a variety of purposes if they were better documented.

The proc connector allows you to receive notification of process events such fork and exec calls, as well as changes to a process’s uid, gid or sid (session id). These are provided through a socket-based interface by reading instances of struct proc_event defined in the kernel header....

The header of interest is:

#include <linux/cn_proc.h>

I found example code here:

http://bewareofgeek.livejournal.com/2945.html

/* This file is licensed under the GPL v2 (http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl2.txt) (some parts was originally borrowed from proc events example)

pmon.c

code highlighted with GNU source-highlight 3.1
*/

#define _XOPEN_SOURCE 700
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <linux/netlink.h>
#include <linux/connector.h>
#include <linux/cn_proc.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdbool.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

/*
* connect to netlink
* returns netlink socket, or -1 on error
*/
static int nl_connect()
{
int rc;
int nl_sock;
struct sockaddr_nl sa_nl;

nl_sock = socket(PF_NETLINK, SOCK_DGRAM, NETLINK_CONNECTOR);
if (nl_sock == -1) {
    perror("socket");
    return -1;
}

sa_nl.nl_family = AF_NETLINK;
sa_nl.nl_groups = CN_IDX_PROC;
sa_nl.nl_pid = getpid();

rc = bind(nl_sock, (struct sockaddr *)&sa_nl, sizeof(sa_nl));
if (rc == -1) {
    perror("bind");
    close(nl_sock);
    return -1;
}

return nl_sock;
}

/*
* subscribe on proc events (process notifications)
*/
static int set_proc_ev_listen(int nl_sock, bool enable)
{
int rc;
struct __attribute__ ((aligned(NLMSG_ALIGNTO))) {
    struct nlmsghdr nl_hdr;
    struct __attribute__ ((__packed__)) {
    struct cn_msg cn_msg;
    enum proc_cn_mcast_op cn_mcast;
    };
} nlcn_msg;

memset(&nlcn_msg, 0, sizeof(nlcn_msg));
nlcn_msg.nl_hdr.nlmsg_len = sizeof(nlcn_msg);
nlcn_msg.nl_hdr.nlmsg_pid = getpid();
nlcn_msg.nl_hdr.nlmsg_type = NLMSG_DONE;

nlcn_msg.cn_msg.id.idx = CN_IDX_PROC;
nlcn_msg.cn_msg.id.val = CN_VAL_PROC;
nlcn_msg.cn_msg.len = sizeof(enum proc_cn_mcast_op);

nlcn_msg.cn_mcast = enable ? PROC_CN_MCAST_LISTEN : PROC_CN_MCAST_IGNORE;

rc = send(nl_sock, &nlcn_msg, sizeof(nlcn_msg), 0);
if (rc == -1) {
    perror("netlink send");
    return -1;
}

return 0;
}

/*
* handle a single process event
*/
static volatile bool need_exit = false;
static int handle_proc_ev(int nl_sock)
{
int rc;
struct __attribute__ ((aligned(NLMSG_ALIGNTO))) {
    struct nlmsghdr nl_hdr;
    struct __attribute__ ((__packed__)) {
    struct cn_msg cn_msg;
    struct proc_event proc_ev;
    };
} nlcn_msg;

while (!need_exit) {
    rc = recv(nl_sock, &nlcn_msg, sizeof(nlcn_msg), 0);
    if (rc == 0) {
    /* shutdown? */
    return 0;
    } else if (rc == -1) {
    if (errno == EINTR) continue;
    perror("netlink recv");
    return -1;
    }
    switch (nlcn_msg.proc_ev.what) {
    case PROC_EVENT_NONE:
        printf("set mcast listen ok\n");
        break;
    case PROC_EVENT_FORK:
        printf("fork: parent tid=%d pid=%d -> child tid=%d pid=%d\n",
            nlcn_msg.proc_ev.event_data.fork.parent_pid,
            nlcn_msg.proc_ev.event_data.fork.parent_tgid,
            nlcn_msg.proc_ev.event_data.fork.child_pid,
            nlcn_msg.proc_ev.event_data.fork.child_tgid);
        break;
    case PROC_EVENT_EXEC:
        printf("exec: tid=%d pid=%d\n",
            nlcn_msg.proc_ev.event_data.exec.process_pid,
            nlcn_msg.proc_ev.event_data.exec.process_tgid);
        break;
    case PROC_EVENT_UID:
        printf("uid change: tid=%d pid=%d from %d to %d\n",
            nlcn_msg.proc_ev.event_data.id.process_pid,
            nlcn_msg.proc_ev.event_data.id.process_tgid,
            nlcn_msg.proc_ev.event_data.id.r.ruid,
            nlcn_msg.proc_ev.event_data.id.e.euid);
        break;
    case PROC_EVENT_GID:
        printf("gid change: tid=%d pid=%d from %d to %d\n",
            nlcn_msg.proc_ev.event_data.id.process_pid,
            nlcn_msg.proc_ev.event_data.id.process_tgid,
            nlcn_msg.proc_ev.event_data.id.r.rgid,
            nlcn_msg.proc_ev.event_data.id.e.egid);
        break;
    case PROC_EVENT_EXIT:
        printf("exit: tid=%d pid=%d exit_code=%d\n",
            nlcn_msg.proc_ev.event_data.exit.process_pid,
            nlcn_msg.proc_ev.event_data.exit.process_tgid,
            nlcn_msg.proc_ev.event_data.exit.exit_code);
        break;
    default:
        printf("unhandled proc event\n");
        break;
    }
}

return 0;
}

static void on_sigint(int unused)
{
need_exit = true;
}

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
int nl_sock;
int rc = EXIT_SUCCESS;

signal(SIGINT, &on_sigint);
siginterrupt(SIGINT, true);

nl_sock = nl_connect();
if (nl_sock == -1)
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);

rc = set_proc_ev_listen(nl_sock, true);
if (rc == -1) {
    rc = EXIT_FAILURE;
    goto out;
}

rc = handle_proc_ev(nl_sock);
if (rc == -1) {
    rc = EXIT_FAILURE;
    goto out;
}

    set_proc_ev_listen(nl_sock, false);

out:
close(nl_sock);
exit(rc);
}

I found that this code needs to run as root to get the notifications.

  • Splendid one - helps to create the solution for superuser.com/questions/354150/… ;-) – FrankH. Oct 17 '13 at 15:22
  • 1
    This is beautiful, was starting to think I was going to have to dive into the kernel code... – notbad.jpeg Jan 19 '16 at 17:20
  • Note that you can use the pid of spawned processes to read additional process information from the /proc/<pid> directory, if desired. I used this to extract command line information to also display the name of a process on creation. – CaitLAN Jenner Jun 20 '18 at 16:04
19

I was interested in trying to figure out how to do this without polling. inotify() does not seem to work on /proc, so that idea is out.

However, any program which is dynamically linked is going to access certain files on startup, such as the dynamic linker. This would be useless for security purposes since it won't trigger on a statically linked program, but might still be of interest:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/inotify.h>
#include <assert.h>
int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    char buf[256];
    struct inotify_event *event;
    int fd, wd;
    fd=inotify_init();
    assert(fd > -1);
    assert((wd=inotify_add_watch(fd, "/lib/ld-linux.so.2", IN_OPEN)) > 0);
    printf("Watching for events, wd is %x\n", wd);
    while (read(fd, buf, sizeof(buf))) {
      event = (void *) buf;
      printf("watch %d mask %x name(len %d)=\"%s\"\n",
         event->wd, event->mask, event->len, event->name);
    }
    inotify_rm_watch(fd, wd);
    return 0;
}

The events this prints out don't contain any interesting information - the pid of the triggering process doesn't seem to be provided by inotify. However it could be used to wake up and trigger a rescan of /proc

Also be aware that short-lived programs might vanish again before this thing wakes up and finishes scanning /proc - presumably you would learn that they had existed, but not be able to learn what they were. And of course anybody could just keep opening and closing an fd to the dyanmic linker to drown you in noise.

  • 2
    Cute solution. +1 – 0xC0000022L May 20 '11 at 17:54
10

Have a look at this little program by Sebastian Krahmer it does exactly what you are asking in a resource efficient way and pretty simple code.

It does require that your kernel has CONFIG_PROC_EVENTS enabled, which is not the case on the latest Amazon Linux Image (2012.09) for example.

UPDATE: Following a request to Amazon the Amazon Linux Image kernels now support PROC_EVENTS

9

Use forkstat, it's the most complete client for proc events:

sudo forkstat -e exec,comm,core

Packaged in Ubuntu, Debian and the AUR.


Before that, there was cn_proc:

 bzr branch lp:~kees/+junk/cn_proc

The Makefile needs a small change (LDLIBS instead of LDFLAGS).

cn_proc and exec-notify.c (which Arnaud posted) share a common ancestor; cn_proc handles a few more events and has cleaner output, but isn't resilient when processes exit quickly.


Ooh, found another fork of exec-notify, extrace. This one indents child processes below their parent (using a pid_depth heuristic).

3

The keyword for the search machine of your choice is "process event connector".

I found two tools that utilize them, exec-notify and cn_proc.

I like the later more, but both do their jobs very well.

0

You can either scan the operating system for programs that match your criterion or you can wait for a program to report itself to your daemon. Which technique you choose will depend heavily on how much control you have over your non-daemon programs.

Scanning can be accomplished by kernel system call, or by reading the user space advertised kernel details (as with the /proc file system). Note that scanning is not a guarantee that you will find any particular program, as if the program manages to launch and terminate between scan cycles, it will not be detected at all.

More complicated techniques of process detection are possible, but they also require more complicated implementations. It is important to know what is truly needed before you start reaching for solutions that are exotic (inserting kernel drivers, etc.), as everything you do is not independent of the system you are monitoring; you actually change the environment by watching it, and some methods of watching the environment might change it inappropriately.

0

CONFIG_FTRACE and CONFIG_KPROBES through brendangregg/perf-tools

git clone https://github.com/brendangregg/perf-tools.git
cd perf-tools
git checkout 98d42a2a1493d2d1c651a5c396e015d4f082eb20
sudo ./execsnoop

On another shell:

while true; do sleep 1; date; done

First shell shows data of format:

Tracing exec()s. Ctrl-C to end.                                                        
Instrumenting sys_execve                                                               
   PID   PPID ARGS 
 20109   4336 date                                                                                       
 20110   4336 sleep 1                                                                                    
 20111   4336 date                                                                                                                                                                                                 
 20112   4336 sleep 1                                                                                    
 20113   4336 date                                                                                       
 20114   4336 sleep 1                                                                                    
 20115   4336 date                                                                                       
 20116   4336 sleep 1

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