25

I'm trying to subclass/extend the native Date object, without modifying the native object itself.

I've tried this:

    var util = require('util');

    function MyDate() {
        Date.call(this);
    }
    util.inherits(MyDate, Date);

    MyDate.prototype.doSomething = function() {
        console.log('Doing something...');
    };        

    var date = new MyDate();
    date.doSomething();

    console.log(date);
    console.log(date.getHours());

and this:

function MyDate() {

    }

    MyDate.prototype = new Date();

    MyDate.prototype.doSomething = function() {
        console.log("DO");
    }

    var date = new MyDate();
    date.doSomething();
    console.log(date);

In both cases, the date.doSomething() works, but when I call any of the native methods such as date.getHours() or even console.log(date), I get 'TypeError: this is not a Date object.'

Any ideas? Or am I stuck to extending the top-level Date object?

0

12 Answers 12

19

Looking at the v8 code, in date.js:

function DateGetHours() {
  var t = DATE_VALUE(this);
  if (NUMBER_IS_NAN(t)) return t;
  return HOUR_FROM_TIME(LocalTimeNoCheck(t));
}

And looks like DATE_VALUE is a macro that does this:

DATE_VALUE(arg) = (%_ClassOf(arg) === 'Date' ? %_ValueOf(arg) : ThrowDateTypeError());

So, seems like v8 won't let you subclass Date.

2
  • There is actually a workaround to subclass Date despite this %_ClassOf requirement in v8. See my answer here.
    – sstur
    Jun 17, 2015 at 4:42
  • @sstur Interesting, but __proto__ is deprecated Jun 18, 2017 at 23:52
10

This can be done in ES5. It requires modifying the prototype chain directly. This is done using __proto__ or Object.setPrototypeOf(). I'm using __proto__ in the sample code since that's most widely supported (although the standard is Object.setPrototypeOf).

function XDate(a, b, c, d, e, f, g) {
  var x;
  switch (arguments.length) {
    case 0:
      x = new Date();
      break;
    case 1:
      x = new Date(a);
      break;
    case 2:
      x = new Date(a, b);
      break;
    case 3:
      x = new Date(a, b, c);
      break;
    case 4:
      x = new Date(a, b, c, d);
      break;
    case 5:
      x = new Date(a, b, c, d, e);
      break;
    case 6:
      x = new Date(a, b, c, d, e, f);
      break;
    default:
      x = new Date(a, b, c, d, e, f, g);
  }
  x.__proto__ = XDate.prototype;
  return x;
}

XDate.prototype.__proto__ = Date.prototype;

XDate.prototype.foo = function() {
  return 'bar';
};

The trick is that we actually instantiate a Date object (with the correct number of arguments) which gives us an object with it's internal [[Class]] set correctly. Then we modify it's prototype chain to make it an instance of XDate.

So, we can verify all this by doing:

var date = new XDate(2015, 5, 18)
console.log(date instanceof Date) //true
console.log(date instanceof XDate) //true
console.log(Object.prototype.toString.call(date)) //[object Date]
console.log(date.foo()) //bar
console.log('' + date) //Thu Jun 18 2015 00:00:00 GMT-0700 (PDT)

This is the only way I know of to subclass date because the Date() constructor does some magic to set the internal [[Class]] and most date methods require that to be set. This will work in Node, IE 9+ and almost all other JS engines.

Similar approach can be used for subclassing Array.

6
  • 2
    Really interesting approach. You can eliminate the switch statement using Date.bind(). eg: var x = new (Function.prototype.bind.apply(Date, [Date].concat(Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments))))
    – bucabay
    Apr 28, 2016 at 9:55
  • 1
    @bucabay, however, it seems about 10x slower, than switch in Chrome 47 on Windows 8.1 Jun 13, 2016 at 14:10
  • @Kanstantsin Probably because prototype.bind() is slow in chrome. stackoverflow.com/questions/18895305/… 10x slower doesn't make an real world optimization difference since the function executes in O(n) where n <= 7. Using switch for something that can be done dynamically in O(n) would be premature optimization imo.
    – bucabay
    Jun 14, 2016 at 23:39
  • @bucabay That's a great suggestion: bind.apply(Date, [Date].concat(slice.call(arguments))) I think the 10x slower is reasonable given the opportunity to generalize this functionality so awesomely. I suspect we might even be able to make further optimizations to mitigate the perf hit. Such as consolidate concat + slice, pre-bind some stuff, etc
    – sstur
    Jul 16, 2016 at 5:55
  • @bucabay: Side note: Turns out any value can be provided as the first array element: [Date].concat(...) can be [null].concat(...) (although I'm not sure it matters)
    – sstur
    Jul 16, 2016 at 6:15
8

Check out the MDC docs on Date specifically:

Note: Note that Date objects can only be instantiated by calling Date or using it as a constructor; unlike other JavaScript object types, Date objects have no literal syntax.

It seems like the Date object isn't really a JS object at all. When I was writing an extension library, I ended up doing the following:

function MyDate() {
   var _d=new Date();
   function init(that) {
      var i;
      var which=['getDate','getDay','getFullYear','getHours',/*...*/,'toString'];
      for (i=0;i<which.length;i++) {
         that[which[i]]=_d[which[i]]; 
      }
   }
   init(this);
   this.doSomething=function() {
    console.log("DO");
   }
}

At least I did that first. The limitations of the JS Date object in the end got the better of me and I switched to my own data storage approach (eg. why does getDate=day of year?)

0
3

In ES6, it will be possible to subclass built-in constructors (Array, Date, and Error) - reference

Problem is there is no way to do this with current ES5 engines, as Babel indicates and will require a browser with native ES6 support.

The current ES6 browser support for subclassing is pretty weak / non-existant as of today (2015-04-15).

2

Section 15.9.5 of the EcmaScript spec says:

In following descriptions of functions that are properties of the Date prototype object, the phrase 'this Date object' refers to the object that is the this value for the invocation of the function. Unless explicitly noted otherwise, none of these functions are generic; a TypeError exception is thrown if the this value is not an object for which the value of the [[Class]] internal property is "Date". Also, the phrase 'this time value' refers to the Number value for the time represented by this Date object, that is, the value of the [[PrimitiveValue]] internal property of this Date object.

Note specifically the bit that says "none of these functions are generic" which, unlike for String or Array, means that the methods cannot be applied to non-Dates.

Whether something is a Date depends on whether its [[Class]] is "Date". For your subclass the [[Class]] is "Object".

1

I believe Date is actually a static function, not a true object, and as such cannot be inherited from using prototypes, so you'll need to create a façade class to wrap any Date functionality you need.

I'd try constructing your new date object as:

function MyDate(value) {
  this.value=new Date(value);

  // add operations that operate on this.value
  this.prototype.addDays=function(num){
     ...
  };
  this.prototype.toString=function() {
    return value.toString();
  };
}
// add static methods from Date
MyDate.now=Date.now;
MyDate.getTime=Date.getTime;
...

(I'm not near a system I can test this on, but I hope you get the idea.)

1

I've tried to do this some days ago and thought I could use mixins.

So you could do something like:

var asSomethingDoable = (function () {
  function doSomething () {
    console.log('Doing something...');
  }
  return function () {
    this.doSomething = doSomething;
    return this;
  }
})();

var date = new Date();
asSomethingDoable.call(date);

This is the variation with cache added, so it's a little bit more complicated. But the idea is to add the methods dinamically.

1

You can also use github.com/loganfsmyth/babel-plugin-transform-builtin-extend

Example:

import 'babel-polyfill'

export default class MyDate extends Date {
    constructor () {
        super(...arguments)
    }
}
1

Based on answer by @sstur

We can use Function.prototype.bind() to construct the Date object dynamically with the passed in arguments.

See: Mozilla Developer Network: bind() method

function XDate() {
  var x = new (Function.prototype.bind.apply(Date, [Date].concat(Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments))))
  x.__proto__ = XDate.prototype;
  return x;
}

XDate.prototype.__proto__ = Date.prototype;

XDate.prototype.foo = function() {
  return 'bar';
};

Verification:

var date = new XDate(2015, 5, 18)
console.log(date instanceof Date) //true
console.log(date instanceof XDate) //true
console.log(Object.prototype.toString.call(date)) //[object Date]
console.log(date.foo()) //bar
console.log('' + date) // Thu Jun 18 2015 00:00:00 GMT-0500 (CDT)
1
var SubDate = function() { 
    var dateInst = new Date(...arguments); // spread arguments object
    /* Object.getPrototypeOf(dateInst) === Date.prototype */
    Object.setPrototypeOf(dateInst, SubDate.prototype);   // redirectionA
    return dateInst; // now instanceof SubDate
};

Object.setPrototypeOf(SubDate.prototype, Date.prototype); // redirectionB

// do something useful
Object.defineProperty(SubDate.prototype, 'year', {
    get: function() {return this.getFullYear();},
    set: function(y) {this.setFullYear(y);}
});

var subDate = new SubDate(); 
subDate.year;                                 // now
subDate.year = 2050; subDate.getFullYear();   // 2050

The problem with the Date constructor function is already explained in the other answers. You can read about the Date.call(this, ...arguments) problem on Date | MDN (first Note).

This solution is a compact workaround which works as intended in all supporting browsers.

0

I know this is a bit late, but for others who may encounter this issue, I manged to effectively subclass Date for a polyfill I needed for PhantomJS. The technique seems to work in other browser as well. There were a few additional issues to work out but essentially I followed the same approach as Rudu.

The full commented code is at https://github.com/kbaltrinic/PhantomJS-DatePolyfill.

0

Based on the answers by @sstur and its improvement by @bucabay:

Note that __proto__ is being used in those answers, which is deprecated and its use is strongly discouraged, at least according to the MDN docs.

Fortunately, it is possible to do what is desired without using __proto__ by setting each individual function from Date.prototype in our class, which is simplified by making use of Object.getOwnPropertyNames().

function XDate() {
    var x = new (Function.prototype.bind.apply(Date, [Date].concat(Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments))));

    Object.getOwnPropertyNames(Date.prototype).forEach(function(func) {
        this[func] = function() {
            return x[func].apply(x, Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments));
        };
    }.bind(this));

    this.foo = function() {
        return 'bar';
    };
}

A minor disadvantage of this method is that XDate isn't actually a subclass of Date. The check xdateobj instanceof Date is false. But this shouldn't be a worry as you can anyway use the methods of the Date class.

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