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I used Perf to extract call graphs in an evince benchmark. The command used is as follows:

sudo perf record -d --call-graph dwarf -c 10000 -e mem_load_uops_retired.l3_miss:uppp /opt/evince-3.28.4/bin/evince

I extracted the backtraces using Perf script and found out that there are many corrupted backtrace instances. Some contained repeated redundant function calls, such as this:

EvJobScheduler 10021  8653.926478:        100 mem_load_uops_retired.l3_miss:uppp:     7fffd1062a00         5080022 N/A|SNP N/A|TLB N/A|LCK N/A
   7ffff4b07207 tcache_get+0x197 (inlined)
   7ffff4b07207 __GI___libc_malloc+0x197 (inlined)
   7fffd9872fb9 gmalloc+0x59 (inlined)
   7fffd9872fb9 gmallocn+0x59 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libpoppler.so.73.0.0)
   7fffd9872fb9 gmallocn+0x59 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libpoppler.so.73.0.0)
   7fffd9951e6f _ZN8TextLine8coalesceEP10UnicodeMap+0xff (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libpoppler.so.73.0.0)
   7fffd9952f82 _ZN9TextBlock8coalesceEP10UnicodeMapd+0x752 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libpoppler.so.73.0.0)
   7fffd995bc37 _ZN8TextPage8coalesceEbdb+0x1507 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libpoppler.so.73.0.0)
   7fffd995cb71 _ZN13TextOutputDev7endPageEv+0x31 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libpoppler.so.73.0.0)
   7fffe803c6d2 _ZL26poppler_page_get_text_pageP12_PopplerPage+0x92 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libpoppler-glib.so.8.9.0)
   7fffe803deb3 poppler_page_get_selection_region+0x63 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libpoppler-glib.so.8.9.0)
   7fffe82ab650 [unknown] (/opt/evince-3.28.4/lib/evince/4/backends/libpdfdocument.so)
   7ffff795f165 ev_job_page_data_run+0x2f5 (/opt/evince-3.28.4/lib/libevview3.so.3.0.0)
   7ffff7961309 ev_job_thread+0xe9 (inlined)
   7ffff7961309 ev_job_thread_proxy+0xe9 (/opt/evince-3.28.4/lib/libevview3.so.3.0.0)
   7ffff5492194 g_thread_proxy+0x54 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libglib-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff4e686da start_thread+0xda (/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libpthread-2.27.so)
   7ffff4b9188e __GI___clone+0x3e (inlined)

There are two consecutive gmallocs() which is not correct. Some were function calls were callers and callees did not match, such as this:

evince 10015  8640.962182:        100 mem_load_uops_retired.l3_miss:uppp:     7fffdc005030         5080022 N/A|SNP N/A|TLB N/A|LCK N/A
   7ffff5a3275f g_action_get_enabled+0x3f (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgio-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff5a2ffcc g_simple_action_group_query_action+0x3c (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgio-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff7130d8c gtk_action_muxer_query_action+0xac (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgtk-3.so.0.2200.30)
   7ffff7130d4c gtk_action_muxer_query_action+0x6c (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgtk-3.so.0.2200.30)
   7ffff7130d4c gtk_action_muxer_query_action+0x6c (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgtk-3.so.0.2200.30)
   7ffff7130d4c gtk_action_muxer_query_action+0x6c (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgtk-3.so.0.2200.30)
   7ffff7130d4c gtk_action_muxer_query_action+0x6c (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgtk-3.so.0.2200.30)
   7ffff7130994 gtk_action_muxer_action_added+0x64 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgtk-3.so.0.2200.30)
   7ffff574510c g_closure_invoke+0x19c (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff575805d signal_emit_unlocked_R+0xf4d (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff5760714 g_signal_emit_valist+0xa74 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff576112e g_signal_emit+0x8e (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff71309e2 gtk_action_muxer_action_added+0xb2 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgtk-3.so.0.2200.30)
   7ffff574510c g_closure_invoke+0x19c (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff575805d signal_emit_unlocked_R+0xf4d (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff5760714 g_signal_emit_valist+0xa74 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff576112e g_signal_emit+0x8e (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff71309e2 gtk_action_muxer_action_added+0xb2 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgtk-3.so.0.2200.30)
   7ffff574510c g_closure_invoke+0x19c (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff575805d signal_emit_unlocked_R+0xf4d (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff5760714 g_signal_emit_valist+0xa74 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff576112e g_signal_emit+0x8e (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff71309e2 gtk_action_muxer_action_added+0xb2 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgtk-3.so.0.2200.30)
   7ffff574510c g_closure_invoke+0x19c (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff575805d signal_emit_unlocked_R+0xf4d (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff5760714 g_signal_emit_valist+0xa74 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff576112e g_signal_emit+0x8e (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff71309e2 gtk_action_muxer_action_added+0xb2 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgtk-3.so.0.2200.30)
   7ffff7131482 gtk_action_muxer_set_parent+0x1d2 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgtk-3.so.0.2200.30)
   7ffff73c46f8 gtk_widget_set_parent+0x198 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgtk-3.so.0.2200.30)
   7ffff73d0228 gtk_window_set_titlebar+0xb8 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgtk-3.so.0.2200.30)
   55555558d391 ev_window_init+0x2e1 (/opt/evince-3.28.4/bin/evince)
   7ffff57699c4 g_type_create_instance+0x1e4 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff574a747 g_object_new_internal+0x2e7 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff574c5bf g_object_new_valist+0x3cf (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   7ffff574c938 g_object_new+0x98 (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgobject-2.0.so.0.5600.4)
   55555558f192 ev_window_new+0x42 (/opt/evince-3.28.4/bin/evince)
   5555555778f4 ev_application_open_recent_view+0x14 (/opt/evince-3.28.4/bin/evince)
   555555573733 load_files+0x473 (inlined)
   555555573733 main+0x473 (/opt/evince-3.28.4/bin/evince)
   7ffff4a91b96 __libc_start_main+0xe6 (/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc-2.27.so)
   555555573899 _start+0x29 (/opt/evince-3.28.4/bin/evince)

This is wrong because:

1) gtk_action_muxer_action_added() calls ‍‍‍g_action_group_query_action() at offset 0x64 (i.e., 100 in decimal):

0x00000000000f898f <+95>:   push   %rax
0x00000000000f8990 <+96>:   callq  0x84e20 <g_action_group_query_action@plt>
0x00000000000f8995 <+101>:  test   %eax,%eax

2) gtk_action_muxer_query_action() calls g_action_group_query_action() at offset 0x6c (i.e., 108 in decimal):

0x00000000000f8d45 <+101>:  mov    %rbp,%rsi
0x00000000000f8d48 <+104>:  callq  0x84e20 <g_action_group_query_action@plt>
0x00000000000f8d4d <+109>:  pop    %rdx

3) gtk_action_muxer_query_action() calls g_action_group_query_action() at offset 0xac (i.e., 172 in decimal):

0x00000000000f8d85 <+165>:  mov    %r12,%rdx
0x00000000000f8d88 <+168>:  callq  0x84e20 <g_action_group_query_action@plt>
0x00000000000f8d8d <+173>:  pop    %rsi

As it can be seen, none of these match the reported backtrace. Does the problem occur when Perf tries to match function names to addresses, or the addresses are wrong, by themselves? How can I revise the problem?

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    relative call is a 5-byte instruction. <+96>: callq 0x84e20 <g_action_group_query_action@plt> has a return address of +101 or +0x65, not +100. i.e. the start of the test instruction in the disassembly. I don't have an answer for your actual question, and that matches the backtrace even less, but it looks like a mis-statement of that detail in the question unless I'm forgetting something about how backtraces normally match up with call addresses. – Peter Cordes Mar 19 '20 at 23:13
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    The mappings are correct. They match exactly with those of ordinary execution. Addresses match symbols (i.e., each single row is correct), but as shown above, some callers and callees do not match. Perhaps some functions in the middle are missed by Perf. Strangely, in all runs, the problem occurs at the same place. – TheAhmad Mar 22 '20 at 18:57
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    Optimizations like inlining are made at compile time; that would result in the runtime-visible part of the callchain definitely skipping some calls that appear in the source. It's not surprising that you get the same thing every execution, but it maybe does rule out some kinds of weirdness. Sorry IDK any more. – Peter Cordes Mar 22 '20 at 23:39
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    Optimized tailcalls can also affect the backtrace. jmp func@plt instead of call func@plt; ret makes the target look like it was called directly by your parent function. – Peter Cordes Mar 23 '20 at 2:19
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    re: gcc -fno-plt style code-gen that inlines the indirect call instead of calling a PLT stub: see How can I call printf normally in assembly without @PLT but just call printf with -l option in gcc with standard library, / 32-bit absolute addresses no longer allowed in x86-64 Linux? / web.archive.org/web/20171111043629/http://www.macieira.org/blog/…. This is orthogonal to backtraces or tailcall optimization. – Peter Cordes Mar 24 '20 at 1:54
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Inlining and optimized tail calls are 2 separate ways for calls in the C source to not appear in the runtime stack backtrace.

An inlined function will result in the calls to its children happening directly from the parent it inlined into, with this function not appearing at all ever.

Multiple levels of inlining are of course possible, and common with small functions.


A function that ends with an optimized jmp tailcall makes it look like the callee was called directly from its parent. Instead of creating a new stack frame below its own, it tears down its own stack frame and jumps to the target function, with the return address still there. So that new function's stack frame will use the same memory that was previously used by the function that made the tailcall.

To put it another way, any call func; ret sequence can be replaced by jmp func. This works even if the jmp target is a (plt stub for) a library function, or an indirect call/jmp *printf@GOTPCREL(%rip) target for gcc -fno-plt style codegen.

See also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tail_call

e.g.

void leaf();  // some other function
void foo() { stuff; ...;   leaf(); }    // ends with a tailcall
void bar() { stuff; foo(); stuff; }

An event that fires while foo is doing "stuff" will have a backtrace of bar->foo.

With no optimization, an event that fires in "leaf" would have a backtrace like bar->foo->leaf.

With an optimized tailcall, it would be bar->leaf, no foo because foo just jumped to leaf, forwarding its return address to leaf so when leaf eventually returns it will be directly to bar.

This works with args and return values, especially register args. Not always with stack args, for example it's impossible if leaf had more stack args than foo.

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    Indeed, the gmallocn()s were inlines, but, unfortunately, Perf did not express it, directly (which is not consistent with Perf normal behavior). The second case (repeated gtk_action_muxer_query_action()s) was tail call elimination. In other words, the the last operation in the callee at gtk_action_muxer_query_action+0x6c is a jump to the beginning of gtk_action_muxer_query_action(). – TheAhmad Apr 10 '20 at 18:58
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    @TheAhmad: I already knew about tailcalls and inlining when looking at your original question and commenting. IIRC there seemed to be calls that apparently came from somewhere that isn't a call instruction, so you wouldn't expect a return address to be pointing there. Yeah, my very first comment was about an off-by-one in a return address. – Peter Cordes Apr 10 '20 at 19:31
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    @TheAhmad: call pushes the address of the next instruction as the return address. felixcloutier.com/x86/call. (RIP during execution of an instruction is the address of the next one, aka one-past-the-end of the call instruction itself.) ret is just a pop into RIP; it's an indirect jump to that address (normally one pushed by a call). Off-by-one is not normal. It should be exactly the next instruction because that's what should execute after a call returns. – Peter Cordes Apr 10 '20 at 19:48
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    I checked the off-by-1 error in a newly installed Ubuntu 18.04` machine` (similar to my real machine) and the error is there, too. I checked this issue in a 16.04 guest OS with a mainline linux kernel 4.x.x. The output format is different and there is no off-by-1 error. Perhaps, there is a bug in newer versions of Perf. – TheAhmad Apr 11 '20 at 21:13
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    @PeterCordes - FYI, perf can report inline functions in some modes, like DWARF unwinding, since the DWARF info can indicate something like "this IP corresponds to function a() inlined into b()", in which case perf can emit a() and b() in the stack, i.e., expand one physical stack frame into multiple displayed ones. – BeeOnRope Apr 19 '20 at 3:48

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