3

I have two things that I want to display with p5, one is a 2D background and the other is a 3D WebGL foreground, both generated by p5. What I noticed is that even if I draw the 2D background before the 3D stuff in the draw() function, the 3D stuff will still be partially covered by the background when rotateX() or rotateY() is called. It looks kind of like this:

enter image description here

I suspect what's happening is that the 2d and 3d stuff are both on the same z-plane, therefore when the foreground is rotated some of it gets covered by the background which now is in the front compared to the covered parts.

So my question is how can I keep the background completely in the back (i.e. not covering foreground regardless of the rotation)?

Below is my current implementation, the 2d background is generated in an offscreen canvas then put onto the main canvas with image() where the 3d stuff is generated, but I'll take any other approaches.

let bg;
p.setup = () => {
    p.createCanvas(width,height,p.WEBGL);
    bg = p.createGraphics(width,height);
}

p.draw = () => {
    ... // draw background bg
    p.image(bg,x,y); // draw background on canvas

    ... // draw foreground
    p.rotateX(degrees);//rotate
}
1

The best way to accomplish this is by clearing the WebGL depth buffer. This is buffer stores the depth for every pixel that has been draw so far so that as subsequent triangles are drawn they can be clipped if some or all of them is behind whatever was previously drawn at that location. This buffer is automatically cleared in between calls to draw() in p5.js but you can also call it yourself mid-frame:

let bg;
let zSlider;
let glContext;

function setup() {
  let c = createCanvas(200, 200, WEBGL);
  glContext = c.GL;

  bg = createGraphics(width, height);
  bg.background('red');
  for (let y = 0; y < height; y += 20) {
    for (let x = 0; x < width; x += 20) {
      if ((x / 20 + y / 20) % 2 === 0) {
        bg.fill('black');
      } else {
        bg.fill(
          map(x + y, 0, width + height, 0, 360),
          map(y, 0, height, 50, 100),
          map(x, 0, width, 50, 100)
        );
      }

      bg.square(x, y, 20)
    }
  }

  zSlider = createSlider(0, width * 2, width);
  zSlider.position(10, 10);
}

function draw() {
  image(bg, -width / 2, -height / 2, width, height);
  // Clear the z-buffer, subsequent drawing commands will not clip, even if they
  // intersect with or are behind previously drawn elements (like our background
  // image)
  glContext.clear(glContext.DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);

  push();
  translate(0, 0, (zSlider.value() - width) * 2);
  rotateX(millis() / 1000 * PI / 4);
  rotateY(millis() / 1000 * PI / 8);
  box(100);
  pop();
}
<script src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/npm/p5@1.3.1/lib/p5.js"></script>

There is also kludgy solution that doesn't rely on calling WebGL internals, but I have only been able to make it work for square canvases:

  1. Switch to an orthographic camera mode before drawing your background image.
  2. Translate in the negative Z direction as far as possible without going beyond the "far" clipping plane.
  3. Draw your background image.
  4. Pop the state back to the normal perspective camera.

This uses orthographic projection to allow you to draw the background image behind the rest of the scene without diminishing size due to perspective. However I haven't come up with a fool proof way to determine what the perfect translation value is, nor how to reliably setup the orthographic project to control where the "far" clipping plane is.

let bg;
let zSlider;

function setup() {
  createCanvas(200, 200, WEBGL);
  bg = createGraphics(width, height);
  bg.background('red');
  for (let y = 0; y < height; y += 20) {
    for (let x = 0; x < width; x += 20) {
      if ((x / 20 + y / 20) % 2 === 0) {
        bg.fill('black');
      } else {
        bg.fill(
          map(x + y, 0, width + height, 0, 360),
          map(y, 0, height, 50, 100),
          map(x, 0, width, 50, 100)
        );
      }

      bg.square(x, y, 20)
    }
  }

  zSlider = createSlider(0, width * 2, width);
  zSlider.position(10, 10);
}

function draw() {
  push();
  ortho();
  translate(0, 0, min(width, height) * -0.13);
  image(bg, -width / 2, -height / 2, width, height);
  pop();

  push();
  translate(0, 0, (zSlider.value() - width) * 2);
  rotateX(millis() / 1000 * PI / 4);
  rotateY(millis() / 1000 * PI / 8);
  box(100);
  pop();
}
<script src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/npm/p5@1.3.1/lib/p5.js"></script>

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